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Publications (1)1.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To examine medical care use and costs, patterns of morbidity and co-morbidity, and other patient characteristics of high users of physician services in British Columbia. This population-based study uses physician claims, hospital discharge summaries and vital statistics data linked at the level of the individual to compare characteristics of high users, other users and non-users of physician services in the Province of British Columbia, Canada. The study included all enrolled adults in the universal health care plan during fiscal year 1996/97. High users were defined as the most costly 5% of users of fee-reimbursed services. Key variables included age, sex, an ecological socio-economic status indicator and a comprehensive set of morbidity indicators, derived from the diagnoses recorded on the utilization records. The top 5% of users consumed a disproportionate 30% of spending on physician services. High users were overwhelmingly characterized by a significant burden of morbidity. Over 80% had at least six different types of morbidity during the study year compared with fewer than 20% of other users. High users were also much more likely to have major diagnoses that were both acute and chronic in nature. Co-morbidity involving psychosocial and chronic medical conditions was also very common. High users of physician services are overwhelmingly characterized by multiple and complex health problems. Policy tools based on a philosophy of deterrence such as cost-sharing are unlikely to have much impact on their costs and will likely do considerable harm.
    Journal of Health Services Research & Policy 11/2003; 8(4):215-24. · 1.73 Impact Factor