Laia Blanco

Autonomous University of Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (7)11.81 Total impact

  • Pancreatology 06/2015; 15(3):S80-S81. DOI:10.1016/j.pan.2015.05.299 · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Aims The etiology of delayed gastric emptying (DGE) after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) is unclear. This study aimed to ascertain the incidence of DGE in a transmesocolic anastomosis (TA) versus an antecolic anastomosis (AA) group of patients. Methods Retrospective study including the last 40 consecutive patients with TA (2004-2006) and the first 40 consecutive patients with AA (2006-2010) performed at our centre. Preoperative, surgical and postoperative data were prospectively collected until patient discharge. Results No preoperative differences were found. Overall postoperative morbidity was higher in the TA group (75 vs 47 %; p = 0.012). No significant differences in DGE were found (TA: 35 % vs AA: 20 %; p = 0.1). Termino-terminal pancreatic anastomosis, gastrostomy, prophylactic somatostatin and the presence of intra-abdominal collections were associated with DGE. On multivariate analysis, only intra-abdominal collections (OR: 4.95 % CI: 1.36-11.8; p = 0.012) predicted DGE. Among patients without other surgical complications (n = 46), DGE rate was significantly higher in the TA group (TA: 38 % vs AA: 12 %, p = 0.04). Conclusions Overall, no significant differences in DGE were found between groups. AA could be a protective factor for DGE when no other surgical complications appear.
    European Surgery 06/2015; 47(3). DOI:10.1007/s10353-015-0311-2 · 0.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The benefit of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with superior mesenteric-portal vein resection (PVR) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDA) is still controversial in terms of morbidity, mortality and survival. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze outcomes of PD with PVR in a Spanish tertiary centre. Between 2002 and 2012, 10 patients underwent PVR (PVR+ group) and 68 standard PD (PVR- group). Morbidity, mortality, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were compared between PVR+ and PVR- group. Prognostic factors were identified by a Cox regression model. Postoperative mortality was 5% (4/78), all patients in PVR- group. Morbidity was higher in the PVR- group compared to PVR+ (63 vs. 30%, P=.004). OS at 3 and 5 years was 43 and 43% in PVR+ group, 35 and 29% in PVR- group (P=.07). DFS at 3 and 5 years DFS were 28 and 15% in PVR+ group, 25 and 20% in PVR- group (P=.84). Median survival was 23.1 months in PVR- group, and 22.8 months in PVR+ group (P=.73). Factors related with OS were absence of adjuvant treatment (OR 2.9, 95%IC: 1.39-6.14, P=.003), R1 resection (OR 2.3, 95%IC: 1.2-4.43, P=.006), preoperative CA 19.9 level ≥ 170 UI/mL (OR 2.3, 95%IC: 1.22-4.32, P=.01). DFS risk factors were R1 resection (OR 2.6, 95%IC: 1.41-4.95, P=.002); moderate or poor tumor differentiation grade (OR 2.7, 95%IC: 1.23-6.17, P=.01); N1 lymph node status (OR 1.8, 95%IC: 1.02-3.19, P=.04); CA 19.9 level ≥ 170 UI/mL (OR 2.4, 95%IC: 1.30-4.54, P=.005). PVR for PDA can be performed safely. Patients with PVR have a comparable survival to patients undergoing standard PD if disease-free margins can be obtained. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.
    Cirugía Española 04/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ciresp.2015.04.001 · 0.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Survival post-liver transplantation (LT) has improved; however, patients are considered at the, risk of malignancy due to prolonged immunosuppression. The long-term outcome of patients developing de novo neoplasm (DN) at our centre was evaluated. Between October 1988 and December 2007, 800 LT were performed in 742 patients. Patients were divided into two study periods according to the time of LT; first: October 1988-December 1995; second: January 1996-December 2007. After a mean follow-up of 5 ± 4.6 years, 71 DN (9.5%) were detected in 742 patients. The cumulative risk of DN development increased with the time from LT although no differences at 3, 5, and 10 years were found when first and second periods were compared (3, 7, 16% vs. 2, 4, 11%, respectively; p = 0.4). DN incidence was higher in the first compared with the second period (10.7 vs. 7.8%; p < 0.04); no significant differences were observed in mortality rate (50 vs. 27%; p = 0.052). Actuarial patient survival post-DN at 1, 3, and 5 years: 67, 48, 45% versus 82, 71, 65%, in the first versus second period, respectively, p < 0.04. DN incidence has decreased in recent years; however, as survival post-LT increases, so does the incidence of DN. Surveillance programmes are necessary to diagnose DN at early stages.
    Hepatology International 06/2011; 5(2):707-15. DOI:10.1007/s12072-010-9231-1 · 2.47 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation 07/2010; 90. DOI:10.1097/00007890-201007272-01361 · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our aim was to assess our experience with the use and management of everolimus after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Among the 759 patients who underwent transplantation from 1988 to 2008, 25 (3.2%) received immunosuppression with everolimus. Their mean age was 55.6 years. We analyzed indications for use, time between transplantation and introduction of everolimus, as well as its efficacy, side effects, and patient survival. The indications for everolimus treatment were: extended hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the explanted liver (n = 6; 24%); HCC recurrence during follow-up (n = 4; 16%); de novo tumor (n = 6; 24%); refractory rejection (n = 3; 12%); side effects of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI; n = 3; 12%); and other causes (n = 3; 12%). Mean time between OLT and everolimus treatment was 40 +/- 33 months (range, 10 days-178 months). Mean follow-up after conversion was 10 +/- 9 months (range, 1.5-25 months). More than half of the patients resolved the event for which the drug was indicated: 75% of patients with refractory rejection; 60% of those with renal insufficiency; and 100% of those converted for neurotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. Two patients with recurrent HCC and 1 with extended HCC died at a mean time of 10.5 months. The 6 cases of de novo tumors were operated and are healthy. Side effects were dyslipidemia in 8 and infection in 2. Five patients (20%) discontinued the drug. In the early posttransplantation period, everolimus is indicated for refractory rejection or as prophylaxis for recurrence of extended tumors. In any time but especially in the late period, everolimus is indicated for patients with serious side effects due to a CNI or to a de novo tumor.
    Transplantation Proceedings 07/2009; 41(6):2172-6. DOI:10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.06.087 · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To report a severe interaction between simvastatin and rapamycin resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a liver transplant patient. A 56-year-old man with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis (Child B) was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent liver transplantation in April 2007. He was immunosuppressed with tacrolimus (FK) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Postoperative complications were arterial hypertension and renal insufficiency. In June 2007, liver dysfunction was detected and acute rejection was diagnosed by biopsy. He received three 500-mg boluses of methylprednisolone and FK levels were maintained between 10 and 12 ng/mL. Laboratory values revealed persistent rejection and MMF was stopped with initiation of rapamicin. One month later, hyperlipidemia appeared as a consequence of rapamicin therapy; simvastatin was administered. In August 2007, the patient was readmitted due to severe muscule pain and the inability to ambulate. Laboratory values were: total bilirubin 16 mg/dL, serum creatinine 4.3 mg/dL, and total creatine kinase (CK) 42,124 U/L. With the suspicion of rhabdomyolysis, leading to worsening of his basal renal insufficiency, rapamycin and tacrolimus were stopped. Hemodialysis was initiated owing to renal failure and hyperkalemia. Some hours later, the patient developed ventricular fibrillation and respiratory failure and succumbed. Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI), corticosteroids, and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) inhibitors are associated with adverse dyslipidemic effects. To reduce the overall cardiovascular risk in these patients, lipid-lowering drugs, especially 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have been widely used. CNI and m-TOR inhibitors, as well as most statins, are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4; thus, pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs are possible. Previous reports have indicated an increased risk of rhabdomyolysis in the presence of concomitant drugs that inhibit simvastatin metabolism. Concomitant administration of statin therapy and drugs that inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis in a patient suffering liver and renal dysfunction.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2009; 41(3):1021-4. DOI:10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.02.019 · 0.95 Impact Factor