S Sreekala

University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

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Publications (3)4.39 Total impact

  • S Sreekala, M Indira
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of two different doses (1 microg and 50 microg Se/100 g body wt) of selenium on quinolinic acid toxicity was investigated in rat's brain. Male albino rats were maintained for 60 days as follows: (1) control group (normal diet), (2) Quinolinic acid group (55 microg/100 g body wt)/day, (3) high dose selenium (50 microg/100 g body wt)/day, (4) high dose selenium ((50 microg/100 g body wt) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body wt)/day (5) low dose selenium (1 microg/100 g body wt)/day and (6) low dose selenium (1 microg/100 g body wt) + Quinolinic acid (55 microg/100 g body wt)/day. Results revealed that quinolinic acid intake lead to an increase in the oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase and GR), increased amount of lipid peroxidation products (MDA,HP and CD) and free fatty acids compared to control group. Co administration of selenium at a dose of 1 microg/100 g body wt along with quinolinic acid had reduced the oxidative stress induced by quinolinic acid and it also led to a change in the brain architecture as evidenced by the decreased activity of acetyl cholinesterase and decreased concentration of neurotransmitters. Histopathological studies revealed that selenium at a dose of 1 microg was more effective in reducing the oxidative stress and higher dose of selenium was toxic.
    Brain research 06/2009; 1281:101-7. · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • S Sreekala, M Indira
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of two different doses of selenium [1 and 50 microg selenium/100 g body weight (wt)] on nicotine-induced oxidative damage in liver was investigated in experimental rats. Male albino rats were maintained for 60 days as follows: (1) control group (normal diet), (2) nicotine group (0.6 mg/kg body wt)/day, (3) high-dose selenium (50 microg/100 g body wt)/day, (4) high-dose selenium (50 microg/100 g body wt) + nicotine (0.6 mg/kg body wt)/day, (5) low-dose selenium (1 microg/100 g body wt)/day, and (6) low-dose selenium (1 microg/100 g body wt) + nicotine (0.6 mg/kg body wt)/day. Nicotine administration caused a decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, an increase in the concentration of lipid peroxidation products and protein carbonyls and an increase in the activity of nitric oxide synthase compared to the control group. Coadministration of nicotine and selenium reduced the concentration of lipid peroxidation products and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes compared to the nicotine group. Selenium also enhanced the metabolism of nicotine. The antioxidant effect was more significant in the group administered a low dose of selenium.
    Biological trace element research 03/2009; 130(1):62-71. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    S Sreekala, M Indira
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of two different doses (1 microg Se/Kg and 50 microg Se/Kg Body wt) of selenium on nicotine induced hyperlipidemia was investigated in rats. Results revealed that nicotine intake caused an increase in concentration of cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids and low density lipoprotein compared to control group. Coadministration of selenium along with nicotine reduced the levels of lipids compared to nicotine group. This reduction was due to reduction in the biosynthesis of lipids as evidenced by the reduced activity of HMGCoA reductase and lipogenic enzymes. Nicotine intake also reduced the absorption of selenium in the intestine. Histopathological studies revealed that selenium at a dose of 1 microg was more effective in reducing lipid levels and higher dose of selenium was toxic.
    Indian journal of physiology and pharmacology 52(2):132-40.

Publication Stats

11 Citations
4.39 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • University of Kerala
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India