Alceu Afonso Jordão

University of São Paulo, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (79)140.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Liver transplant recipients are at an increased oxidative stress risk due to pre-existing hepatic impairment, ischemia-reperfusion injury, immunosuppression, and functional graft rejection. This study compared the oxidative status of healthy control subjects, patients with liver cirrhosis on the list for transplantation, and subjects already transplanted for at least 12 months.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2014; · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the effects of taurine supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver injury in rats fed a choline-deficient diet. Thirty rats were divided into three groups (n=10), to receive one of the following diets for 4weeks: control diet (C), choline-deficient diet (CDD), or choline-deficient diet supplemented with taurine (CDDT). The CDD and the CDDT consisted of AIN-93 without the recommended choline content of 2.5%, and the CDDT was supplemented by the addition of 2.5% taurine. Four weeks of ingesting a CDD resulted in a significant increase in plasma Hcy (50%) as well as a decrease in liver S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentration and S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio. No changes were found in plasma methionine and cysteine plasma levels compared to control group. Four weeks of ingesting a CDD also caused a significant (P<0.05) increase in hepatic total fat, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. In addition, reduced hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) were found in rats fed a CDD compared to controls. Taurine supplementation of the CDD normalized genes involved in the remethylation pathway, BHMT and CHDH, which were impaired by CDD alone. However, taurine supplementation failed to prevent CDD-induced Hcy metabolism disturbances and hepatic injury. Also, taurine added to CDD caused decreased expression of PEMT, CHKa, and CHKb, key genes involved in phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis and liver fat accumulation. Taurine supplementation failed to ameliorate impaired Hcy metabolism and liver injury caused by CDD intake.
    Life sciences 04/2014; · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess oxidative stress and the profile of fatty acids incorporated into the hepatic tissue of animals refed with high-fat (HF) diets after acute food restriction. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups and fasting for 48 hours. One group was sacrificed without refeeding (NR), a control group (C) was refed with the standard AIN-93 diet and the remaining groups with HF diets respectively consisting of hydrogenated vegetable oil (PHVO), trans-free (TF) margarine and trans-free margarine enriched with ω-3 and ω-6 (O). After this period the animals were sacrificed for malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase and hepatic fatty acid determination. The groups refed with HF diets showed elevation of MDA levels compared to the C group (p<0.001 for GVH and p<0.01 for TF and O). Hepatic catalase activity was higher in the TF and O groups compared to group C (p<0.05 for both). The amount of saturated fatty acids was lower in the PHVO and O groups compared to the remaining ones (p<0.001). The consumption of high-fat diets after prolonged fasting favors oxidative imbalance in hepatic tissue.
    Acta cirurgica brasileira / Sociedade Brasileira para Desenvolvimento Pesquisa em Cirurgia 03/2014; 29(3):178-185. · 0.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) plasma levels after acute exercise in humans. Twenty-three young (under-20) soccer players were divided into 2 groups: creatine (Cr)- and placebo (Pla)-supplemented groups. The supplementation was performed in double-blind controlled manner using creatine or placebo tablets with 0.3 g/kg during 7 days. Before and after 7 days of supplementation, the athletes performed an acute high-intensity sprint exercise (two consecutive running-based anaerobic sprint test protocol consisted in 6 × 35 m sprint with 10 s between them). Blood samples were collected before and after 7 days of supplementation as well as 0 and 1 h after exercise protocol. Homocysteine concentration significant increased (P < 0.05) 1 h after acute exercise (18 %). Acute exercise also decreased red blood cell S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) 30 % with no changes in SAM/SAH ratio. Seven days of creatine supplementation were able to increase (P < 0.05) plasma creatine concentration (Pla 130.1 ± 21.7 vs Cr 1,557.2 ± 220.3 μmol/L) as well as decrease (P < 0.05) plasma guanidinoacetic acid (33 %). Controversially, creatine supplementation did not change Hcy plasma level after 7-day supplementation (Pla 6.9 ± 0.2 vs Cr 7.2 ± 0.2 μmol/L) or after acute exercise (Pla 8.2 ± 0.3 vs Cr 8.4 ± 0.3 μmol/L). No changes in plasma vitamin B12 and folate as well as cysteine and methionine were found. Seven days of creatine supplementation does not avoid increased plasma Hcy induced by acute sprint exercise in humans.
    European Journal of Nutrition 12/2013; · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin C offered through a dietary supplement and an ascorbic acid (AA)-rich diet on exercise-induced oxidative stress. METHODS: The sample consisted of 13 elite swimmers (6 men and 7 women) aged 18 to 26 years. The same athletes were submitted to an acute exercise session in 3 phases, with different treatments: control (C), AA-rich diet (D) and AA supplement (S), where blood samples were collected before, immediately after and 24 hours after exercise. A mixed effects linear regression model was used to compare phases and stages. RESULTS: The habitual consumption of antioxidants did not differ between phases, except that AA intake was higher during the D and S phases than during the C phase. The use of an AA-rich diet provided lower lipid peroxidation due to lower lipid hydroperoxide (FOX) values, a reduction of peroxidation after exercise due to reduction of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and an increase in vitamin C levels after exercise. The use of an AA supplement also restricted lipid peroxidation after exercise and increased the antioxidant power due to higher levels of reduced glutathione (GSH). Without the addition of AA , the swimmers had greater hepatic damage as shown by higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lower antioxidant levels (vitamin C and GSH) and increased uric acid. CONCLUSION: Thus, the changes observed after the addition of AA to the diet of swimmers suggest an important role of this micronutrient in the defense against exercise-induced oxidative stress.
    Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte 12/2013; 19(6):394-398. · 0.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This controlled, prospective, nonrandomized clinical investigation has as its chief strength the fact that it was done in humans with active disease and apparently on fairly modest therapeutic regimens. The aim was to present the results of oxidative-stress biomarkers in humans suffering from pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Inflammation and oxidative stress are essential in PAH with increased lipid peroxidation and reduced antioxidant defenses. Twenty-four adult patients of both sexes, with a mean age of 21 years, were subdivided into 2 groups: a control group of 12 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers and a PAH group (PAHG) of 12 volunteers with PAH receiving outpatient treatment. Oxidative stress was evaluated by plasma activity of reduced glutathione (GSH); lipid peroxidation was expressed by malondialdehyde (MDA) and lipid hydroperoxide (ferrous oxidation of xylenol orange [FOX] assay); vitamin E was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical analyses showed significant differences for (1) the TNF-α measure, with highest values in PAHG patients; (2) the plasma GSH, with lowest values in PAHG patients; (3) vitamin E, with the lowest concentrations in PAHG patients; (4) MDA measure, with highest values in PAHG patients; and (5) the lipid hydroperoxide FOX measure, with highest values in PAHG patients. In conclusion, inflammation and oxidative stress are present in patients with PAH, as confirmed by increased lipid peroxidation, reduced GSH, and low concentrations of vitamin E.
    Pulmonary circulation. 12/2013; 3(4):856-61.
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    ABSTRACT: Some researchers found decreased levels of plasma taurine in obese subjects and animals, and reduced expression of an important enzyme of taurine synthesis. These evidences, coupled with the metabolic imbalance of obesity and the possible anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of taurine, highlighted the use of taurine as a supplement in obesity treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether taurine supplementation, associated with nutritional counseling, modulates oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and glucose homeostasis in obese women. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted with 16 women with obesity diagnosis and 8 women in the normal weight range. The obese volunteers were matched by age and body mass index and randomly assigned to either the placebo (3 g/day starch flour) or taurine (3 g/day taurine) group. The study lasted 8 weeks, and the experimental protocol included nutritional assessment and determination of plasma sulfur amino acids, insulin, and adiponectin, serum glycemia, and markers of inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Plasma taurine levels were significantly decreased (41 %) in the obese volunteers. Both the placebo and taurine groups showed significant reduction in weight (3 %), with no differences between groups. Different from placebo, taurine-supplemented group showed significant increase in plasma taurine (97 %) and adiponectin (12 %) and significant reduction in the inflammatory marker hs-C-reactive protein (29 %) and in the lipid peroxidation marker thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (20 %). Eight weeks of taurine supplementation associated with nutritional counseling is able to increase adiponectin levels and to decrease markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) in obese women.
    European Journal of Nutrition 09/2013; · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lipodystrophy syndrome is an unexpected clinical manifestation in patients infected with HIV and might be a clinical marker of increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Because hyperhomocysteinemia has been associated with CVD, the goal of the present study was to investigate homocysteine (Hcy) levels and their association with the factors of lipodystrophy syndrome in men with HIV. Hcy metabolism-related molecules were determined in 13 men infected with HIV with lipodystrophy (HIV+LIP), 10 men with HIV without lipodystrophy (HIV), and 10 healthy controls (C). Significant (P < 0.05) increased Hcy plasma levels were found in HIV (20.5%) and in HIV+LIP (35.2%) compared with the control group. Plasma levels of vitamin B12 (HIV, 26.5%; HIV+LIP, 28.8%) and folate (HIV, 39.1% and HIV+LIP, 49.4%) were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the two groups of HIV patients compared with control. HIV+LIP men presented raised plasma total sulfur-containing amino acids (20.1%) and lower total plasma thiol (11.3%) than controls. The same was not observed in the HIV group. Spearman's correlation test revealed significant (P < 0.05) association between plasma Hcy and duration of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and plasma insulin, as well as plasma adiponectin levels. Our results demonstrated that HIV+LIP men were more susceptible to disturbances in Hcy metabolism compared with men infected with HIV without lipodystrophy characteristics. Duration of HAART treatment, elevated plasma insulin, and low levels of adiponectin seem to be relevant for the appearance of these Hcy metabolic disorders.
    Nutrition 09/2013; · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation on oxidative stress and inflammation markers after acute repeated-sprint exercise in humans. Twenty-five players under age 20 y were randomly assigned to two groups: Cr supplemented and placebo. Double-blind controlled supplementation was performed using Cr (0.3 g/kg) or placebo tablets for 7 d. Before and after 7 d of supplementation, the athletes performed two consecutive Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Tests (RAST). RAST consisted of six 35-m sprint runs at maximum speed with 10 sec rest between them. Blood samples were collected just prior to start of test (pre), just after the completion (0 h), and 1 h after completion. Average, maximum, and minimum power values were greater in the Cr-supplemented group compared with placebo (P < 0.05). There were significant increases (P < 0.05) in plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) up to 1 h after acute sprint exercise in the placebo-supplemented group. Malondialdehyde, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), catalase, and superoxide dismutase enzymes also were increased after exercise in both groups. Red blood cell glutathione was lower after exercise in both groups. Cr supplementation reversed the increase in TNF-α and CRP as well as LDH induced by acute exercise. Controversially, Cr supplementation did not inhibit the rise in oxidative stress markers. Also, antioxidant enzyme activity was not different between placebo and Cr-supplemented groups. Cr supplementation inhibited the increase of inflammation markers TNF-α and CRP, but not oxidative stress markers, due to acute exercise.
    Nutrition 06/2013; · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a multifactorial disease associated with vascular dysfunction, low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, and oxidative stress. However, it is not known whether low NO bioavailability and oxidative stress affect the responsiveness of ED patients to sildenafil. We tested this hypothesis by studying 28 healthy subjects (control group), 26 patients with ED without comorbidities (ED group), and 18 patients with ED and diabetes mellitus (ED/DM group). The International Index for Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire was used to assess the erectile function of all participants, and their responsiveness to sildenafil was assessed as the percentage of change in the five-item version of IIEF score before and after sildenafil treatment. Levels of whole blood nitrite, antioxidants markers (ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and reduced glutathione), and oxidative stress markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and protein carbonyl) were determined. We found a negative correlation between whole blood nitrite levels and the responses to sildenafil in both ED groups (P < 0.05). FRAP correlated negatively with the responses to sildenafil in the ED/DM group (P < 0.05). No other significant associations were found. Our findings show evidence that low NO bioavailability is associated with better responses to sildenafil in patients with ED (with or without DM).
    Archiv für Experimentelle Pathologie und Pharmakologie 05/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Understanding the consequences of cancer for energy metabolism is required in order to define strategies that both prevent and treat malnutrition. Carnitine is essential for lipid energy metabolism. The objective of this study was to assess presurgical plasma carnitine levels in cancer patients and their association with dietary intake, anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, indirect calorimetry, plasma amino acid levels, and urinary carnitine and nitrogen values. METHODS: This was a prospective study in which two groups were randomly selected: one consisting of esophageal and gastric cancer patients (n = 24) and the other of healthy volunteers (control group, n = 12). RESULTS: Average plasma and urinary carnitine values ranged from 60 to 80 μM and 78 to 124 μM, respectively, in both groups, with no significant difference between them. Moreover, methionine and lysine levels, as well as resting energy expenditure, did not differ between cancer patients and controls. Plasma free carnitine levels, however, were significantly lower in cancer patients, 80 % (p < 0.05) of whom had deficient urinary carnitine excretion, insufficient dietary protein intake, and low body fat reserves. CONCLUSION: Although cancer patients had carnitine deficiency and lower carnitine stores, these did not affect resting energy expenditure, total food intake, or plasma lysine and methionine levels.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer 04/2013;
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    Revista de Nutrição 04/2013; 26(2):225-232. · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    Brazilian Journal of Nutrition. 03/2013; 26(2):225.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the vitamin's status and the inflammatory, and oxidative stress markers in adult patients up to 3 days after thermal injury. This prospective study was conducted with 11 patients 24 to 72 hours after thermal injury (Burn Group), total surface area ranging from 10 to 41%, 34.3 ± 9.3 years, 82% of males, body mass index of 22.3 ± 2.9 kg/m. We included 11 healthy adults (Control Group), 36.5 ± 7.6 years, 73% of males, and body mass index of 23.8 ± 2.5 kg/m. Laboratory data were measured (plasma total protein, albumin, transferrin, lymphocyte counts, zinc, and iron), as well as serum vitamins (folic acid, vitamin B12, and vitamins A, C, and E), inflammatory stress markers (C-reactive protein, ferritin, and acid α1-glycoprotein) and oxidative stress markers such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The inflammatory stress was characterized by lower levels of total protein (median difference 1.2 g/dL, 95% CI: 0.4-2.1) and albumin (median difference 0.9 g/dL, 95% CI: 0.5-1.5), and higher levels of C-reactive protein (median difference -8.12 mg/dL, 95% CI: -11.62 to 4.61) and α-1 glycoprotein acid (median difference -28.56 mg/dL, 95% CI: -51.57 to -5.07) in burn patients. Decreased serum levels of vitamin A (median difference 1.10 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.42-1.66) and vitamin C (median difference 0.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: 0.50-1.04) were also detected. There was no statistical evidence of difference in the serum levels of glutathione peroxidase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances between burn patients and controls, respectively. Even though there is an inflammatory stress, the obtained data showed that oxidative stress markers are normal 24 to 72 hours after burn injury. The decrease in negative acute phase protein may account for the diminished serum levels of vitamin A, which seems to be related to inflammatory stress. The marked decrease in the serum levels of vitamin C can be justified by augmented cutaneous loss and consumption in the regeneration of vitamin E.
    Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association 01/2013; · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thiamine and benfotiamine are vitamin B1 and pro-vitamin B1 substances, respectively. Vitamin B1 plays an essential role in energy metabolism, and its deficiency leads to neurologic and cardiovascular pathologies, as seen in alcoholics. This study presents new data about the effects of thiamine hydrochloride or benfotiamine treatment given to rats with acute alcohol intoxication, on the distribution of thiamine and its phosphate esters in liver, plasma and erythrocytes. The treatments were effective in increasing thiamine levels in plasma, erythrocytes and liver cells. The benfotiamine-treated group had its total plasma thiamine increased by 100%. In erythrocytes, thiamine levels were 4- and 25-fold higher in the groups treated with thiamine and benfotiamine, respectively, compared with the untreated groups. Liver thiamine was increased by 60% in the treated groups compared with the untreated groups. Thus, we verified the high bioavailability especially of benfotiamine within six hours of ethanol administration.
    European journal of pharmaceutical sciences: official journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences 01/2013; · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) frequently leads to body weight gain, which appears to be a potential cause of the chronic inflammation frequently present in these patients. The consequences of this inflammation are impaired nutritional status, accelerated atherosclerosis, and increased mortality. To assess the association between inflammation and body fat in female patients treated with PD. Nineteen female patients on PD for at least 6 months with no infectious complications or malignant or acute inflammatory diseases. Nutritional status was determined by measuring weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist (WC), and mid-arm circumferences (MAC), mid-arm muscle area, and tricipital fold (TCF). Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) was used to determine body composition. Biochemical evaluation included the determination of serum albumin, urea, creatinine, and C-reactive protein (CRP). The glucose absorbed from the dialysis solution was quantitated. According to BMI, two patients were classified as malnourished and ten as overweight/obese. Sixteen individuals had high WC measurements and 12 had excess body fat (BF) as measured by BIA. High CRP levels were observed in 12 patients, who had higher WC, MAC, BMI, TCF, and BF measurements compared to non-inflamed patients. Positive associations were detected between CRP and BMI, MAC, WC, and TCF. Associations between BF and CRP suggest that adiposity may be a potent exacerbating factor of inflammation in this population, especially visceral fat. Thus, obesity may be considered to be one more factor responsible for the early atherosclerosis and high cardiovascular mortality observed in these patients.
    Inflammation 01/2013; · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The systemic oxidative status in hypertensives disorders of pregnancy (HDP) and its association with endothelial dysfunction is controversial. In the present study, we evaluated systemic plasma levels of oxidative stress markers (TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) and carbonyl) and total antioxidant status (FRAP (ferric reducing ability of plasma (ferric reducing/antioxidant power) and reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide))), as well as assessed the impact these markers have on nitric oxide (NO) status in healthy pregnant (HP, n=38), gestational hypertensive (GH, n=33) and preeclamptic pregnant women (PE, n=28). We found similar values of TBARS among all groups, and reduced carbonyl levels in HDP between the PE and GH. Conversely, significant increases in plasma activity of antioxidant status were observed in the GH and PE groups compared to the HP group (using both MTT or FRAP method). Importantly, HDP present significantly lower nitrite levels compared to HP women. In Conclusion, our findings show a compensatory antioxidant mechanism against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HDP, which is not associated with nitrite levels restoration.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 10 January 2013; doi:10.1038/jhh.2012.58.
    Journal of human hypertension 01/2013; · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the impedance of Wistar rats treated with high-fat and high-sucrose diets and correlate their biochemical and anthropometric parameters with chemical analysis of the carcass. Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats were fed a standard (AIN-93), high-fat (50% fat) or high-sucrose (59% of sucrose) diet for 4 weeks. Abdominal and thoracic circumference and body length were measured. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to determine resistance and reactance. Final body composition was determined by chemical analysis.
    Revista de Nutrição 10/2012; · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As shown in numerous studies, natural compounds may exert adverse effects, mainly when associated with some drugs. The hydroalcoholic extract of Mikania glomerata is the pharmaceutical form present in commercially available syrup used for the treatment of respiratory diseases in popular Brazilian medicine. The objective of the present investigation was (1) to evaluate the preventive effects of standardized hydroalcoholic extract of M. glomerata (MEx) against antitumoral drug doxorubicin (DXR)-induced micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) in a subchronic assay in mice, and (2) to determine the liver content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the antioxidants glutathione (GSH) and vitamin E (VE). Male Swiss mice were treated for 30 d with MEx added to drinking water, combined or not with DXR (90 mg/kg body weight) injected intraperitoneally (ip) 24 h before analysis. The results demonstrated that MEx produced no genotoxic damage, but significantly increased the frequency of MNPCE induced by DXR, indicating a drug-drug interaction. This rise was not accompanied by lipid peroxidation or antioxidants level reduction, as measured by MDA, GSH, and VE. Despite the presence of coumarin (a known antioxidant), MEx may exert adverse effects probably in association with mutagenic compounds, although this effect on DNA damage did not involve oxidative stress.
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Part A 08/2012; 75(16-17):1102-9. · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome compromises body composition and produces metabolic alterations, such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. This study aims to determine whether energy expenditure and substrate oxidation are altered due to human HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome. We compared energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in 10 HIV-infected men with lipodystrophy syndrome (HIV+LIPO+), 22 HIV-infected men without lipodystrophy syndrome (HIV+LIPO-), and 12 healthy controls. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were assessed by indirect calorimetry, and body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The substrate oxidation assessments were performed during fasting and 30 min after eucaloric breakfast consumption (300 kcal). The resting energy expenditure adjusted for lean body mass was significantly higher in the HIV+LIPO+ group than in the healthy controls (P = 0.02). HIV-infected patients had increased carbohydrate oxidation and lower lipid oxidation when compared to the control group (P < 0.05) during fasting conditions. After the consumption of a eucaloric breakfast, there was a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation only in the HIV+LIPO- and control groups (P < 0.05), but there was no increase in the HIV+LIPO+ group. Hypermetabolism and alteration in substrate oxidation were observed in the HIV+LIPO+ group.
    Nutrition 04/2012; 28(9):912-6. · 2.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

303 Citations
140.20 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2014
    • University of São Paulo
      • • Faculty of Medicine (FM)
      • • Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto (FMRP)
      • • Departamento de Patologia (FM) (São Paulo)
      • • Department of Clinical Medicine (VCM)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2012
    • Escola De Educação Física E Esporte - USP
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2002–2011
    • Universidade de Ribeirão Preto
      Entre Rios, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2006
    • Universidade do Vale do Itajaí (Univali)
      Itajahy, Santa Catarina, Brazil