Stéphanie Finet

French National Centre for Scientific Research, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Stéphanie Finet?

Claim your profile

Publications (46)192.14 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The ubiquitous small heat shock proteins are essential elements in cellular protection, through a molecular chaperone activity. Among them, human small heat shock protein HspB1, HspB4 and HspB5 are involved in oncogenesis, anti-apoptotic activity and lens transparency. Therefore, these proteins are potential therapeutic targets in many diseases. Their general chaperone activity is related to their dynamic and multiple oligomeric structures, which are still poorly understood. The tissue selective distribution of HspB1 and HspB4, two cellular partners of HspB5, suggests that these two proteins might have evolved to play distinct physiological functions. Moreover, hetero-complex formation seems to be favoured in vivo, yet the functional specificity of the HspB1-HspB5 and HspB4-HspB5 hetero-complexes compared to the homo-oligomers remains unclear in the stress response pathway. A powerful approach combining biochemistry, biophysics and bioinformatics, allowed us to compare the different assemblies, with a special emphasis on the structural data, subunit exchange properties, activity and sequence evolution. We showed that they all exhibit different properties, from structural organization in physiological versus stress conditions, to chaperone-like activity, whatever the level of sequence conservation. Subunit exchange kinetics leading to HspB1-HspB5 or HspB4-HspB5 hetero-complex formation is also different between these two complexes: HspB5 exchanges more rapidly subunits with HspB1 than with HspB4. The relative sequence conservation in the sHSP superfamily does hide important structural heterogeneity and flexibility, which confer an enlarged range of different surface necessary to efficiently form complexes with various stress-induced cellular targets. Our data suggest that the formation of hetero-complexes could be an original evolutionary strategy to gain new cellular functions.
    Biochimie 12/2011; 94(4):975-84. · 3.14 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: t is well known that the formation of G-quadruplex by guanosine derivatives strongly depends on counter-ions. To investigate quadruplex stability in the presence of different counter-ions and in the absence of a covalent axial backbone, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on lyotropic phases of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) in the form of sodium and ammonium salts. As a result, concentration-pressure phase diagrams were obtained in a pressure range from 1 bar to about 2 kbar, and the structural properties of the different phases derived. Interestingly, cholesteric (Ch) and hexagonal (H) columnar phases were found in both GMP salts, but during compression a reverse behavior was detected: in GMP sodium salt, pressure induces a H-Ch phase transition, while in GMP ammonium salt the induced transition is Ch-H. Different counter-ion stabilization, which control quadruplex length and the consequence of lateral interactions, probably explain such observation.
    Internationl Review of Biophysical Chemistry I.Re.Bi.C. 01/2011; 2.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Structure-function relationships in the tetrameric enzyme urate oxidase were investigated using pressure perturbation. As the active sites are located at the interfaces between monomers, enzyme activity is directly related to the integrity of the tetramer. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the enzyme was investigated by x-ray crystallography, small-angle x-ray scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Enzymatic activity was also measured under pressure and after decompression. A global model, consistent with all measurements, discloses structural and functional details of the pressure-induced dissociation of the tetramer. Before dissociating, the pressurized protein adopts a conformational substate characterized by an expansion of its substrate binding pocket at the expense of a large neighboring hydrophobic cavity. This substate should be adopted by the enzyme during its catalytic mechanism, where the active site has to accommodate larger intermediates and product. The approach, combining several high-pressure techniques, offers a new (to our knowledge) means of exploring structural and functional properties of transient states relevant to protein mechanisms.
    Biophysical Journal 05/2010; 98(10):2365-73. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aging of the lens is accompanied by extensive deamidation of the lens specific proteins, the crystallins. Deamidated crystallins are increased in the insoluble proteins and may contribute to cataracts. Deamidation has been shown in vitro to alter the structure and decrease the stability of human lens betaB1, betaB2 and betaA3-crystallin. Of particular interest, betaB2 mutants were constructed to mimic the effect of in vivo deamidations at the interacting interface between domains, at Q70 in the N terminal domain and at Q162, its C-terminal homologue. The double mutant was also constructed. We previously reported that deamidation at the critical interface sites decreased stability, while preserving the dimeric 3D structure. In the present study, dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and small angle X-ray scattering were used to investigate the effect of deamidation on stability, thermal unfolding and aggregation. The bovine betaLb fraction was used for comparative analysis. The chaperone requirements of the various samples were determined using bovine alpha-crystallins as the chaperone. Deamidation at both interface Gln residues or at Q70, but not Q162, significantly lowered the temperature for unfolding and aggregation, which was rapidly followed by precipitation. This deamidation-induced aggregation and precipitation was not completely prevented by alpha-crystallin chaperone. A potential mechanism for cataract formation in vivo involving accumulation of deamidated beta-crystallin aggregates is discussed.
    Experimental Eye Research 02/2010; 90(6):688-98. · 3.03 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report on small-angle x-ray scattering measurements on liquid water aimed at characterizing the pressure evolution of its large-scale structure. Diffraction profiles have been fitted assuming a Lorentzian dependence on the exchanged momentum. As a result, we observe an anomalous behavior of the diffracted intensity that tends to disappear, increasing either the pressure or the temperature. This effect is discussed in detail and imputed to the ability of hydrostatic pressure to weaken hydrogen bonds.
    The Journal of Chemical Physics 11/2009; 131(19):194502. · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mutation of the Arg120 residue in the human alphaB-crystallin sequence has been shown to be associated with a significant ability to aggregate in cultured cells and have an increased oligomeric size coupled to a partial loss of the chaperone-like activity in vitro. In the present study, static and dynamic light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and size exclusion chromatography were used to follow the temperature and pressure induced structural transitions of human alphaB-crystallin and its R120G, R120D, and R120K mutants. The wild type alphaB-crystallin was known to progressively increase in size with increasing temperature, from 43 to 60 degrees C, before aggregating after 60 degrees C. The capacity to increase in size with temperature or pressure, while remaining soluble, had disappeared with the R120G mutant and was found to be reduced for the R120K and R120D mutants. The R120K mutant, which preserves the particle charge, was the less impaired. The deficit of quaternary structure plasticity was well correlated with the decrease in chaperone-like activity previously observed. However, the mutant ability to exchange subunits, measured with a novel anion exchange chromatography assay, was found to be increased, suggesting subtle relationships between structural dynamics and function. From molecular dynamic simulations, the R120 position appeared critical to conserve proper intra- and intersubunit interactions. In silico mutagenesis followed by simulated annealing of the known small heat shock protein 3D structures suggested a destabilization of the dimeric substructure by the R120 mutations. The whole of the results demonstrated the importance of the R120 residue for structural integrity, both static and dynamic, in relation with function.
    Biochemistry 02/2009; 48(2):442-53. · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A long-range ordered organic/inorganic material is synthesized from a bis-silane, (EtO)(3)Si-(CH(2))(3)-NHCONH-C(6)H(4)-NHCONH-(CH(2))(3)-Si(OEt)(3). This crosslinked sol-gel solid exhibits a supramolecular organization via intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between urea groups (-NHCONH-) and covalent siloxane bonding, triple bond Si-O-Si triple bond. Time-resolved in situ X-ray measurements (coupling small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques) are performed to follow the different steps involved in the synthetic process. A new mechanism based on the crystallization of the hydrolyzed species followed by their polycondensation in solid state is proposed.
    Small 02/2009; 5(4):503-10. · 7.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Myelin is a multi-lamellar membrane surrounding neuronal axons and increasing their conduction velocity. When investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), the lamellar quasi-periodical arrangement of the myelin sheath gives rise to distinct peaks, which allow the determination of its molecular organization and the dimensions of its substructures. In this study we report on the myelin sheath structural determination carried out on a set of human brain tissue samples coming from surgical biopsies of two patients: a man around 60 and a woman nearly 90 years old. The samples were extracted either from white or grey cerebral matter and did not undergo any manipulation or chemical-physical treatment, which could possibly have altered their structure, except dipping them into a formalin solution for their conservation. Analysis of the scattered intensity from white matter of intact human cerebral tissue allowed the evaluation not only of the myelin sheath periodicity but also of its electronic charge density profile. In particular, the thicknesses of the cytoplasm and extracellular regions were established, as well as those of the hydrophilic polar heads and hydrophobic tails of the lipid bilayer. SAXS patterns were measured at several locations on each sample in order to establish the statistical variations of the structural parameters within a single sample and among different samples. This work demonstrates that a detailed structural analysis of the myelin sheath can also be carried out in randomly oriented samples of intact human white matter, which is of importance for studying the aetiology and evolution of the central nervous system pathologies inducing myelin degeneration.
    Physics in Medicine and Biology 10/2008; 53(20):5675-88. · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In colloidal systems, the interplay between the short range attraction and long-range repulsion can lead to a low density associated state consisting of clusters of individual particles. Recently, such an equilibrium cluster phase was also reported for concentrated solutions of lysozyme at low ionic strength and close to the physiological pH. Stradner et al. [(2004) Equilibrium cluster formation in concentrated protein solutions and colloids. Nature 432:492-495] found that the position of the low-angle interference peak in small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) patterns from lysozyme solutions was essentially independent of the protein concentration and attributed these unexpected results to the presence of equilibrium clusters. This work prompted a series of experimental and theoretical investigations, but also revealed some inconsistencies. We have repeated these experiments following the protein preparation protocols of Stradner et al. using several batches of lysozyme and exploring a broad range of concentrations, temperature and other conditions. Our measurements were done in multiple experimental sessions at three different high-resolution SAXS and SANS instruments. The low-ionic-strength lysozyme solutions displayed a clear shift in peak positions with concentration, incompatible with the presence of the cluster phase but consistent with the system of repulsively interacting individual lysozyme molecules. Within the decoupling approximation, the experimental data can be fitted using an effective interparticle interaction potential involving short-range attraction and long-range repulsion.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 05/2008; 105(13):5075-80. · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the first time-resolved investigation of motions of proteins in densely grafted layers of spherical polyelectrolyte brushes. Using small-angle x-ray scattering combined with rapid stopped-flow mixing, we followed the uptake of bovine serum albumin by poly(acrylic acid) layer with high spatial and temporal resolution. We find that the total amount of adsorbed protein scales with time as t(1/4). This subdiffusive behavior is explained on the basis of directed motion of the protein along the polyelectrolyte chains.
    Physical Review Letters 04/2008; 100(15):158301. · 7.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the past two decades, the geometric pathways involved in the transformations between inverse bicontinuous cubic phases in amphiphilic systems have been extensively theoretically modeled. However, little experimental data exists on the cubic-cubic transformation in pure lipid systems. We have used pressure-jump time-resolved X-ray diffraction to investigate the transition between the gyroid QGII and double-diamond QDII phases in mixtures of 1-monoolein in 30 wt % water. We find for this system that the cubic-cubic transition occurs without any detectable intermediate structures. In addition, we have determined the kinetics of the transition, in both the forward and reverse directions, as a function of pressure-jump amplitude, temperature, and water content. A recently developed model allows (at least in principle) the calculation of the activation energy for lipid phase transitions from such data. The analysis is applicable only if kinetic reproducibility is achieved, at least within one sample, and achievement of such kinetic reproducibility is shown here, by carrying out prolonged pressure-cycling. The rate of transformation shows clear and consistent trends with pressure-jump amplitude, temperature, and water content, all of which are shown to be in agreement with the effect of the shift in the position of the cubic-cubic phase boundary following a change in the thermodynamic parameters.
    Langmuir 04/2008; 24(6):2331-40. · 4.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 01/2008; · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stopped-flow mixing coupled to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established technique for investigating structural kinetics in solution down to the millisecond range. More recently, the emphasis has shifted to the sub-millisecond range using continuous flow microfluidic mixing devices. The aim of this article is to review the present status and limitations when applying mixing techniques to a wide range of soft matter and biological systems. In the case of SAXS, special consideration of the mixing quality is necessary for a quantitative description of the scattered intensity. This is demonstrated through two representative examples involving protein refolding and micellar self-assembly.
    Advances in Colloid and Interface Science 12/2006; 127(1):9-18. · 6.17 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The direct lyotropic polymorphism of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) was investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at different water concentrations under compression up to 2 kbar, i.e., in the pressure intermediate range where interesting biophysical transformations occur and the functional characteristics of cell membranes are altered. The results show that pressure induces the transition from the hexagonal phase to the micellar Pm3n cubic phase in hydrated samples (c between 0.5 and 0.6, c being the weight concentration of lipid in the mixture) and the transition from the bicontinuous Ia3d cubic phase to the hexagonal phase in drier samples (c = 0.8). By increasing the pressure on very dry samples, a lamellar L(alpha) phase was observed to form transitorily at the Ia3d cubic-hexagonal phase transition. Phase compressibility and then the lipid and water partial molecular compressibilities were derived as a function of pressure and concentration. As a result, we assessed the very low compressibility of the hydration water within the lipid phases, and we demonstrated that the compressibility of DTAC is very dependent on pressure. Moreover, the molecular parameters of DTAC calculated in the different phases during compression confirmed that pressure induces small but continuous conformational changes, definitely different from the large changes observed in lipid molecules forming type II structures.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 07/2006; 110(25):12410-8. · 3.61 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Small angle X-ray scattering was used to follow the temperature and pressure induced structural transitions of polydisperse native calf lens alpha-crystallins and recombinant human alphaB-crystallins and of monodisperse yeast HSP26. The alpha-crystallins were known to increase in size with increasing temperature, whereas HSP26 partially dissociates into dimers. SAXS intensity curves demonstrated that the average 40-mer calf alpha-crystallin converted into 80-mer in a narrow temperature range, from 60 to 69 degrees C, whereas the average 30-mer alphaB-crystallin was continuously transformed into 60-mer at lower temperature, from 40 to 60 degrees C. These temperature-induced transitions were irreversible. Similar transitions, yet reversible, could be induced with pressure in the 100 to 300 MPa pressure range. Moreover, temperature and pressure could be combined to lower the transition temperatures. On the other hand, SAXS curves recorded during pressure scans from 0.1 to 200 MPa with monodisperse 24-mer HSP26 revealed dissociation of the 24-mer into dimers. This dissociation was complete and reversible. Whatever the sHSP, a decrease of partial specific volume was found to be associated with the pressure induced quaternary structure transitions, in agreement with the hypothesis that such transitions represent a first step on the protein denaturation pathway.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 04/2006; 1764(3):372-83. · 4.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The liquid crystalline lamellar (L(alpha)) to double-diamond inverse bicontinuous cubic (Q(D)(pi)) phase transition for the amphiphile monoelaidin in excess water exhibits a remarkable sequence of structural transformations for pressure or temperature jumps. Our data imply that the transition dynamics depends on a coupling between changes in molecular shape and the geometrical and topological constraints of domain size. We propose a qualitative model for this coupling based on theories of membrane fusion via stalks and existing knowledge of the structure and energetics of bicontinuous cubic phases.
    Physical Review Letters 04/2006; 96(10):108102. · 7.73 Impact Factor
  • Acta Crystallographica Section A - ACTA CRYSTALLOGR A. 01/2006; 62.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cellulose, the main structural component of plant cell walls, is the most abundant carbohydrate polymer in nature. To break down plant cell walls, anaerobic microorganisms have evolved a large extracellular enzyme complex termed cellulosome. This megadalton catalytic machinery organizes an enzymatic assembly, tenaciously bound to a scaffolding protein via specialized intermodular "cohesin-dockerin" interactions that serve to enhance synergistic activity among the different catalytic subunits. Here, we report the solution structure properties of cellulosome-like assemblies analyzed by small angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics. The atomic models, generated by our strategy for the free chimeric scaffoldin and for binary and ternary complexes, reveal the existence of various conformations due to intrinsic structural flexibility with no, or only coincidental, inter-cohesin interactions. These results provide primary evidence concerning the mechanisms by which these protein assemblies attain their remarkable synergy. The data suggest that the motional freedom of the scaffoldin allows precise positioning of the complexed enzymes according to the topography of the substrate, whereas short-scale motions permitted by residual flexibility of the enzyme linkers allow "fine-tuning" of individual catalytic domains.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2005; 280(46):38562-8. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The relative effectiveness of different anions in crystallizing proteins follows a reversed Hofmeister sequence for pH pI. The phenomenon has been known almost since Hofmeister's original work but it has not been understood. It is here given a theoretical explanation. Classical electrolyte and double layer theory deals only with electrostatic forces acting between ions and proteins. Hydration and hydration interactions are dealt with usually only in terms of assumed hard core models. But there are, at and above biological salt concentrations, other non-electrostatic (NES) ion-specific forces acting that are ignored in such modeling. Such electrodynamic fluctuation forces are also responsible for ion-specific hydration. These missing forces are variously comprehended under familiar but generally unquantified terms, typically, hydration, hydrogen bonding, pi-electron-cation interactions, dipole-dipole, dipole-induced dipole and induced dipole-induced dipole forces and so on. The many important body electrodynamic fluctuation force contributions are accessible from extensions of Lifshitz theory from which, with relevant dielectric susceptibility data on solutions as a function of frequency, the forces can be extracted quantitatively, at least in principle. The classical theories of colloid science that miss such contributions do not account for a whole variety of ion-specific phenomena. Numerical results that include these non-electrostatic forces are given here for model calculations of the force between two model charge-regulated hen-egg-white protein surfaces. The surfaces are chosen to carry the same charge groups and charge density as the protein. What emerges is that for pH<pI (where the anions are counter-ions) the repulsive double layer forces increase in the order NaSCN<NaI<NaCl, while at higher pH>pI (where anions are co-ions) the forces increase in the order NaCl<NaI<NaSCN. This is in excellent agreement with both solubility experiments and experiments using SAXS. The results are also consistent with cation effects observed in protein solutions. Our results may provide some insights into a long-standing problem in solution chemistry and biology.
    Biophysical Chemistry 11/2005; 117(3):217-24. · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Measles virus is a negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus within the Mononegavirales order,which includes several human pathogens, including rabies, Ebola, Nipah, and Hendra viruses. The measles virus nucleoprotein consists of a structured N-terminal domain, and of an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain, N(TAIL) (aa 401-525), which undergoes induced folding in the presence of the C-terminal domain (XD, aa 459-507) of the viral phosphoprotein. With in N(TAIL), an alpha-helical molecular recognition element (alpha-MoRE, aa 488-499) involved in binding to P and in induced folding was identified and then observed in the crystal structure of XD. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, we have derived a low-resolution structural model of the complex between XD and N(TAIL), which shows that most of N(TAIL) remains disordered in the complex despite P-induced folding within the alpha-MoRE. The model consists of an extended shape accommodating the multiple conformations adopted by the disordered N-terminal region of N(TAIL), and of a bulky globular region, corresponding to XD and to the C terminus of N(TAIL) (aa 486-525). Using surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and heteronuclear magnetic resonance, we show that N(TAIL) has an additional site (aa 517-525) involved in binding to XD but not in the unstructured-to-structured transition. This work provides evidence that intrinsically disordered domains can establish complex interactions with their partners, and can contact them through multiple sites that do not all necessarily gain regular secondary structure.
    Protein Science 09/2005; 14(8):1975-92. · 2.74 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

934 Citations
192.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2011
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • • Centre de génétique moléculaire
      • • Centre de Biochimie Structurale
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Brookhaven National Laboratory
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2003–2009
    • European Synchrotron Radiation Facility
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • University of Leeds
      Leeds, England, United Kingdom
  • 2008
    • Universita degli studi di Ferrara
      • Department of Physics and Earth Sciences
      Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 2006
    • Università Politecnica delle Marche
      Ancona, The Marches, Italy
  • 2005
    • Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France