Marilza Vc Rudge

São Paulo State University, São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (8)13.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To investigate and compare the incidence of histopathological placental lesions in mild gestational hyperglycemia, gestational diabetes and overt diabetes at term and preterm gestation. One-hundred-and-thirty-one placental samples were collected from Diabetes mellitus (DM) positive screened patients. Two diagnostic tests, glycemic profile and 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in parallel identified 4 groups normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH), gestational DM (GDM) or overt DM (DM). Placental tissue specimens and sections from 4 groups were obtained by uniform random sampling and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Placentas from MGH group presented 17 types of histopathological change and higher rates of syncytial nodes and endarteritis. GDM placentas presented only nine types of histopathological change, high rates of dysmaturity, low rates of calcification and no syncytial nodes. Overt DM placentas showed 22 types of histopathological change, 21 of which were present in the preterm period. There were histopathological similarities between MGH and DM placentas, but the former exhibited a higher incidence of endarteritis, which has been described as a "post-mortem" phenomenon. Our results confirmed that the distinct placental changes associated with DM and MGH depend on gestational period during which the diabetic insult occurs. It may reasonably be inferred that subclinical maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy, as showed in MGH group, is responsible for increased placental endarteritis, a postmortem lesion in the live fetus.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 08/2011; 3(1):19. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women submitted to a Multidisciplinary Program for Childbirth and Motherhood Preparation (MPCM). This is a not randomized controlled trial on 67 nulliparous pregnant women divided into two groups according to participation (MPCM Group; n = 38) or not (Control Group; n = 29) in MPCM. The program consisted of 10 meetings (between the 18th and the 38th gestational week) during which educational, physiotherapeutic and interaction activities were developed. Anxiety was quantified at the beginning and at the end of the gestational period by the Trace-State Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Initial maternal anxiety was equivalent between the groups. At the end of the gestational period, it was observed that anxiety levels increased in the Control Group and were maintained in the MPCM Group. A higher occurrence of vaginal deliveries (83.8%) and hospital discharge of three-day-older newborns (81.6%) as a result of MPCM was also significant. Levels of state-anxiety at the end of pregnancy showed a negative correlation with vaginal delivery, gestational age, birth weight and Apgar index at the first minute and positive correlation with the hospital period remaining of the newborns. In the study conditions, MPCM was associated with lower levels of maternal anxiety, a larger number of vaginal deliveries and shorter hospitalization time of newborns. It was not related to adverse perinatal outcomes.
    Reproductive Health 10/2010; 7:28. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experimental models are necessary to elucidate diabetes pathophysiological mechanisms not yet understood in humans. Objective: To evaluate the repercussions of the mild diabetes, considering two methodologies, on the pregnancy of Wistar rats and on the development of their offspring. In the 1st induction, female offspring were distributed into two experimental groups: Group streptozotocin (STZ, n = 67): received the beta-cytotoxic agent (100 mg STZ/kg body weight - sc) on the 1st day of the life; and Non-diabetic Group (ND, n = 14): received the vehicle in a similar time period. In the adult life, the animals were mated. After a positive diagnosis of pregnancy (0), female rats from group STZ presenting with lower glycemia than 120 mg/dL received more 20 mg STZ/kg (ip) at day 7 of pregnancy (2nd induction). The female rats with glycemia higher than 120 mg/dL were discarded because they reproduced results already found in the literature. In the mornings of days 0, 7, 14 and 21 of the pregnancy glycemia was determined. At day 21 of pregnancy (at term), the female rats were anesthetized and killed for maternal reproductive performance and fetal development analysis. The data were analyzed using Student-Newman-Keuls, Chi-square and Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) Tests (p < 0.05). STZ rats presented increased rates of pre (STZ = 22.0%; ND = 5.1%) and post-implantation losses (STZ = 26.1%; ND = 5.7%), reduced rates of fetuses with appropriate weight for gestational age (STZ = 66%; ND = 93%) and reduced degree of development (ossification sites). Mild diabetes led a negative impact on maternal reproductive performance and caused intrauterine growth restriction and impaired fetal development.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 04/2010; 2(1):26. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many experimental studies have been performed to evaluate mild diabetes effects. However, results are divergent regarding glycemia and insulin measurement, fetal macrossomia, and placental weights. The aim was to investigate repercussions of neonatally-induced mild diabetes on the maternal organism and presence of congenital defects in their offspring in other mild diabetes model. On the day of birth, female offspring were distributed into two groups: Group streptozotocin (STZ): received 100 mg STZ/kg body weight, and Control Group: received vehicle in a similar time period. Maternal weights and glycemias were determined at days 0, 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy. At day 21 of pregnancy, the rats were anesthetized and a laparotomy was performed to weigh and analyze living fetuses and placentas. The fetuses were classified as small (SPA), appropriate (APA) and large (LPA) for pregnancy age. Fetuses were also analyzed for the presence of external anomalies and processed for skeletal anomaly and ossification sites analysis. Statistical significance was considered as p < 0.05. In STZ group, there was increased glycemia at 0 and 14 days of pregnancy, lower weights throughout pregnancy, higher placental weight and index, an increased proportion of fetuses classified as SPA and LPA, and their fetuses presented with an increased frequency of abnormal sternebra, and absent cervical nuclei, which were not enough to cause the emergence of skeletal anomalies. Thus, this study shows that mild diabetes altered fetal development, characterized by intrauterine growth restriction. Further, the reached glycemia does not lead to any major congenital defects in the fetuses of streptozotocin-induced mild diabetic rats.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 01/2010; 2(1):37. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise on pregnancy outcome in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats (n = 11 animals/group). These animals were randomly assigned to sedentary (G1) and exercised groups, beginning from day 0 (G2) or 7 (G3) to day 20 of pregnancy. The moderate exercise was a swimming programme. At day 21 of pregnancy, all rats were anaesthetized and killed to obtain pregnancy outcome data. All rats presented glycaemia higher than 300 mg/dl, regardless of the exercise training. The G3 group showed higher live fetus number per implantation site and lower resorption number per implantation site compared with the G1 group. The fetal and placental mean weights per litter and the total number of ossification sites were significantly lower in the exercised groups (P < 0.05). Placental index was lower in the G2 and G3 groups compared with the G1 group. The occurrence of skeletal anomalies indicated that exercise increased the number of altered fetuses. Thus, moderate exercise achieved better outcomes by increasing the number of live births and decreasing resorption. However, exercise increased skeletal anomalies and decreased fetal and placental weights.
    Reproductive biomedicine online 12/2009; 19(6):852-8. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remains a significant medical challenge. Diabetes during pregnancy may be divided into clinical diabetes and gestational diabetes. Experimental models are developed with the purpose of enhancing understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases that affect humans. With regard to diabetes in pregnancy, experimental findings from models will lead to the development of treatment strategies to maintain a normal metabolic intrauterine milieu, improving perinatal development by preventing fetal growth restriction or macrosomia. Based on animal models of diabetes during pregnancy previously reported in the medical literature, the present study aimed to compare the impact of streptozotocin-induced severe (glycemia >300 mg/dl) and mild diabetes (glycemia between 120 and 300 mg/dl) on glycemia and maternal reproductive and fetal outcomes of Wistar rats to evaluate whether the animal model reproduces the maternal and perinatal results of clinical and gestational diabetes in humans. On day 5 of life, 96 female Wistar rats were assigned to three experimental groups: control (n = 16), severe (n = 50) and mild diabetes (n = 30). At day 90 of life, rats were mated. On day 21 of pregnancy, rats were killed and their uterine horns were exposed to count implantation and fetus numbers to determine pre- and post-implantation loss rates. The fetuses were classified according to their birth weight. Severe and mild diabetic dams showed different glycemic responses during pregnancy, impairing fetal glycemia and weight, confirming that maternal glycemia is directly associated with fetal development. Newborns from severe diabetic mothers presented growth restriction, but mild diabetic mothers were not associated with an increased rate of macrosomic fetuses. Experimental models of severe diabetes during pregnancy reproduced maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnant women presenting uncontrolled clinical diabetes. On the other hand, the mild diabetes model caused mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy, although it was not enough to reproduce the increased rate of macrosomic fetuses seen in women with gestational diabetes.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 01/2009; 1(1):21. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we sought to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in a cohort of pregnant women with a wide range of glucose tolerance, prepregnancy risk factors for MS during pregnancy, and the effects of MS in the outcomes in the mother and in the newborn. One hundred and thirty six women with positive screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were classified by two diagnostic methods: glycemic profile and 100 g OGTT as normoglycemic, mild gestational hyperglycemic, GDM, and overt GDM. Markers of MS were measured between 2428th during the screening. The prevalence of MS was: 0%; 20.0%; 23.5% and 36.4% in normoglycemic, mild hyperglycemic, GDM, and overt GDM groups, respectively. Previous history of GDM with or without insulin use, BMI >/= 25, hypertension, family history of diabetes in first degree relatives, non-Caucasian ethnicity, history of prematurity and polihydramnios were statistically significant prepregnancy predictors for MS in the index pregnancy, that by its turn increased the adverse outcomes in the mother and in the newborn. The prevalence of MS increases with the worsening of glucose tolerance; impaired glycemic profile identifies pregnancies with important metabolic abnormalities even in the presence of a normal OGTT, in patients that are not classified as having GDM.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 01/2009; 1(1):3. · 1.92 Impact Factor
  • Epidemiology. 01/2005; 16(5).