I Perera

University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Publications (11)14.01 Total impact

  • Irosha Perera, Lilani Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: To determine income inequalities in both perceived oral health and oral health-related behaviours and the role oral health-related behaviours in explaining income inequalities in perceived oral health among Sri Lankan adolescents. The sample included 1,218 fifteen-year-olds selected from 48 schools in the Colombo district using a stratified cluster sampling technique. Data were collected by means of questionnaires to both adolescents and their parents. Perceived oral health status was the oral health outcome considered while oral health-related behaviours included brushing frequency, use of dental services in the preceding year and consumption of sugary food/drinks and fruit/vegetables. Tooth brushing frequency, use of dental services in the preceding year and consumption of fruit/vegetables were associated with perceived oral health status. Also, the trends in perceived oral health and all oral health behaviours across ordered income groups were statistically significant. However, it was evident from the Poisson regression models that the effect of income on perceived oral health did not attenuate significantly following adjustment for oral health behaviours. This study demonstrated that oral health behaviours were associated with perceived oral health and also the existence of income gradients in perceived oral health and oral health behaviours. However, oral health behaviours were not accountable for the observed income gradients in perceived oral health.
    Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology 01/2011; 39(4):345-51. · 1.80 Impact Factor
  • Irosha Perera, Lilani Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to assess the value of different indicators of socioeconomic status for oral health research among Sri Lankan adolescents. Six indicators of socioeconomic status were assessed in terms of their relationship to 2 oral health outcomes. The sample consisted of 15-year-old students (n = 1218) selected from 48 schools in the Colombo district using a stratified cluster sampling technique. Data collection included oral examinations of students and questionnaires to both students and their parents. The correlations between the 6 indicators were low to moderate. The indicators of household material assets and parental educational status emerged as significant predictors of the 2 oral health outcomes. Therefore, it is concluded that indicators of material assets-namely, the family affluence scale and the asset index-could be used as optimal measures of socioeconomic status in oral health research among adolescents in Sri Lanka.
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 10/2010; 22(4):407-14. · 1.06 Impact Factor
  • I Perera, L Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: to assess socio-economic inequalities in two perceived oral health outcomes namely perceived oral health status and perceived oral impacts among adolescents in Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional study where the data where collected by means of structured questionnaires to the children and their parents. A total 1,225 15-year-old adolescents attending state, private and international schools in the Colombo district of Sri Lanka. Inverse social gradients in perceived oral health status and perceived oral impacts were observed in relation to six socioeconomic indicators in the bivariate analyses. Adolescents from lower social positions had significantly reported more oral impacts and had rated their oral health as poor. But it was mainly the indicators of family material affluence that emerged as significant predictors of perceived oral health outcomes in the logistic regression analyses. The study demonstrates the existence of significant social gradients in perceived oral health outcomes among adolescents from a developing country. Further studies to assess causes of social gradients in perceived oral health outcomes are recommended.
    Community dental health 03/2010; 27(1):29-34. · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • Irosha Perera, Lilani Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between dental caries and dietary patterns in Sri Lankan adolescents. The sample consisted of 1218, 15-year-olds who were selected from 48 schools in the Colombo district of Sri Lanka using a stratified cluster sampling technique. Data were collected by distributing questionnaires among both adolescents and their parents and by conducting an oral examination of all adolescents. A validated 13 foods/food groups food frequency questionnaire was used to obtain dietary information. Factor analysis extracted three dietary patterns from the 13 foods/food groups, and these patterns accounted for 41.44% of variation in the dietary intake. They were labelled as sweet, healthy and affluent dietary patterns. From the multiple logistic regression analysis, the sweet dietary pattern, household income and oral hygiene status emerged as significant predictors of dental caries. It was concluded that dietary pattern labelled as sweet emerged as a significant predictor of dental caries.
    Oral health & preventive dentistry 01/2010; 8(2):165-72. · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • Irosha Perera, Lilani Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: To determine factors associated with perceived oral health status among adolescents in Sri Lanka. A descriptive, cross-sectional study where the data were collected by means of an oral examination and questionnaires to both children and their parents. Schools in the Colombo district, Sri Lanka. 1,218, 15-year-old adolescents who were selected from 48 schools using a stratified cluster sampling techniques. Nearly 21% of the sample rated their oral health as poor. According to the hierarchical logistic regression models the percentage of variance in perceived oral health explained by the four groups of independent variables namely: socio-demographic variables, oral health behaviours, clinical oral health indicators and subjective measures of oral health status were 3, 1, 4 and 7% respectively. The final model indicated that poor perceived oral health was significantly associated with low household income, not using dental services, presence of gingivitis, being aware about the presence of oral disease, presence of toothache and other oral symptoms and perceived need for dental care. It accounted for 15% of the variation in perceived oral health. Subjective measures of oral health contributed most to the single-item perceived oral health rating of adolescents. Socio-demographic variables and normative measures of untreated caries, missing teeth and gingivitis had a limited role in explaining perceived oral health in Sri Lankan adolescents.
    International Dental Journal 01/2009; 58(6):349-55. · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • I Perera, L Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to assess the social inequality in dental caries among adolescents in Sri Lanka. A total of 1,225 15-year-olds were selected using a stratified cluster sampling technique from schools in the Colombo district. The data were collected by means of an oral examination and questionnaires to both children and their parents. There were statistically significant inverse gradients between caries prevalence, caries experience (DMFS) and all five socio-economic indicators considered. Maternal education and family affluence emerged as significant predictors of dental caries. The magnitude of social inequality in dental caries was assessed using the slope index of inequality (SII) and the concentration index based on the concentration curve. SII for all socio-economic indicators were negative and, except in relation to father's occupation, they were statistically significant. With the socio-economic groups ordered from the lowest to the highest, a negative SII indicates that caries experience decreased with improving socio-economic status. The concentration index for DMFS was negative (-0.111) and statistically significant, indicating disproportionate concentration of dental caries among the poor children. In conclusion, this study has shown the existence of a social gradient with respect to dental caries among adolescents in Sri Lanka and it also illustrates the use of SII and concentration index as tools to determine the magnitude of social inequality in dental caries.
    Caries Research 02/2008; 42(2):105-11. · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • L Ekanayke, I Perera
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    ABSTRACT: To assess factors associated with perception of oral health in older individuals. A cross sectional study. A densely populated urban area in Sri Lanka. 585 older adults aged 60 years and above of which 475 were living at home and 110 in institutions. The present analysis is limited to 235 subjects who were subjected to a clinical oral examination. The data were collected by means of an interviewer-administered questionnaire and a clinical oral examination. Overall, 48% of the dentate and 42% of the edentate perceived their oral health as poor. The final model of the hierarchical logistic regression analysis for the dentate revealed that presence of retained roots, mobile teeth, >20 missing teeth and perceived need for dental care were significantly associated with poor perceived oral health status. For the edentate, perceived need for dental care, loss of taste sensation and difficulty in eating were significantly associated with poor perceived oral health status. Factors associated with perceived oral health status differed between the dentate and the edentate. Clinical oral health indicators emerged as significant predictors of perceived oral health status in the dentate although the explanatory power of these indicators on perception of oral health was low.
    International Dental Journal 02/2005; 55(1):31-7. · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Lilani Ekanayake, Irosha Perera
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    ABSTRACT: The authors assessed the perceived need for dental care among 585 older individuals, of whom 235 received a clinical oral examination. Of the 235 participants, only 171 were dentate. The present analysis is limited to this group. Of these 171 dentate adults, 43 percent perceived a need for dental care. Of this sample section, 53 percent perceived a need for dentures. Age, perceived oral health status, presence of mobile teeth, three impact items of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) scale--namely "had a painful aching in the mouth, had difficulty in eating and that the diet had been unsatisfactory due problems with teeth, mouth or dentures"--and the total OHIP-14 score showed significant associations with perceived need for dental care in bi-variate analysis. Poor perceived oral health status emerged as the strongest predictor of perceived need for dental care in logistic regression.
    Special Care in Dentistry 01/2005; 25(4):199-205.
  • L Ekanayake, I Perera
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the association between clinical oral status and oral impacts experienced by older individuals in Sri Lanka. A total of 585 individuals who were above 60 years and were residents of an urban area was selected using a multistage cluster sampling combined with probability proportionate to size technique. However the present analysis is limited to 235 individuals who were subjected to a clinical oral examination. An interviewer administered Sinhala translation of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) scale was used to assess the oral impacts experienced by the sample. An oral examination was carried out following the interview. Of the 235 subjects clinically examined 64 (27%) were edentulous. The associations between clinical parameters and oral impacts were assessed in the 171 dentate subjects. There were positive, weak but significant correlations between the number of missing teeth, the number of teeth with third degree mobility and the OHIP score. Also those who wore dentures and had halitosis had significantly higher OHIP scores than those who did not wear dentures and did not have halitosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that 'wearing denture' and 'having halitosis' were significant predictors of the OHIP score. In conclusion, there was a weak association between clinical parameters and oral impacts experienced by these older individuals.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 10/2004; 31(9):831-6. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • L Ekanayake, I Perera
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    ABSTRACT: To test the psychometric properties of a Sinhalese translation of the OHIP-14 scale for use among older adults in Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional survey. The English version of the OHIP-14 was translated in to Sinhalese, pre-tested and subsequently administered to the subjects by a trained interviewer. Moratuwa--a densely populated urban area in the Western province of Sri Lanka. 585 individuals aged 60 years and above. Reliability of the translated scale was assessed in terms of internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was evaluated by examining the associations between perceived oral health status, perceived need for dental care and the OHIP scores. Cronbach's alpha of the translated scale was 0.93. Corrected item-total correlation coefficients ranged from 0.53-0.80. The highly significant associations between perceived oral health status, perceived need for dental care and the OHIP scores support the construct validity of the translated scale. The Sinhalese translation of the OHIP-14 is a valid and reliable instrument to measure oral health related quality of life in older adults of Sri Lanka.
    Gerodontology 01/2004; 20(2):95-9. · 1.83 Impact Factor
  • I Perera, L Ekanayake
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the impact of oral conditions on the quality of life in an urban older population in Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional study where the data were collected by means of an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 585 Sinhala speaking older adults aged 60 years and above who were residents of a densely populated urban area. Of the 585, 475 were living at home and 110 were living in institutions. Psycho-social and functional impacts of oral conditions were assessed using the Sinhalese translation of the OHIP-14 scale. 25% of subjects had experienced one or more impacts due to their oral conditions fairly often or very often during the preceding 6 months. Multiple impacts were reported by 17% of the subjects. The most commonly experienced impact item was "uncomfortable to eat" (17%). The mean OHIP score was 0.8 +/- 1.8. The prevalence of oral impacts and the OHIP scores were significantly associated with age, perceived oral health status, perceived need for dental care and dental visiting patterns. Those who visited a dentist during the past 12 months reported significantly more impacts than those who did not visit. Oral impacts that affected the quality of life were relatively common in this sample of older individuals.
    Community dental health 01/2004; 20(4):236-40. · 0.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

104 Citations
14.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • University of Melbourne
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    • Victoria University Melbourne
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 2004–2009
    • University of Peradeniya
      • Department of Community Dental Health
      Mahanuvara, Central, Sri Lanka