Stacie Scruggs

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (4)12.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective The objective of this paper is to describe baseline differences between obese and non-obese endometrial cancer survivor in anthropometrics, exercise behavior, fitness, heart rate and blood pressure, and quality of life, and to analyze whether the effect of a home-based exercise intervention on these outcomes differed for obese and non-obese participants. Methods One hundred post-treatment Stage I–IIIa endometrial cancer survivors participated in a single arm 6 month study in which they received a home-based exercise intervention. Cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometrics, and exercise behavior were measured every two months, and quality of life (QOL) and psychological distress were measured at baseline and 6 months. Results Adjusting for potential confounders, at baseline obese survivors had poorer cardiorespiratory fitness (p = .002), higher systolic blood pressure (p = .018), and lower physical functioning (p < .001) and ratings of general health (p = .002), and more pain (p = .037) and somatization (.002). Significant improvements were seen in exercise behavior, resting heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and multiple QOL domains over the course of the intervention. Obese survivors had less improvement in exercise behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness than non-obese survivors, but there were no differences with regard to improvements in QOL and stress. Conclusions Home based exercise interventions are beneficial to endometrial cancer survivors, including those whose BMI is in the obese range. While obese survivors have lower levels of physical activity and fitness, they experienced similar activity, fitness, quality of life and mental health benefits. Exercise should be encouraged in endometrial cancer survivors, including those who are obese.
    Gynecologic Oncology 01/2014; 133(1):48–55. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: This study evaluated whether social-cognitive theory (SCT) variables, as measured by questionnaire and ecological momentary assessment (EMA), predicted exercise in endometrial cancer survivors. Method: One hundred posttreatment endometrial cancer survivors received a 6-month home-based exercise intervention. EMAs were conducted by using hand-held computers for 10- to 12-day periods every 2 months. Participants rated morning self-efficacy and positive and negative outcome expectations by using the computer, recorded exercise information in real time and at night, and wore accelerometers. At the midpoint of each assessment period, participants completed SCT questionnaires. Using linear mixed-effects models, the authors tested whether morning SCT variables predicted minutes of exercise that day (Question 1) and whether exercise minutes at time point Tj could be predicted by questionnaire measures of SCT variables from time point Tj-1 (Question 2). Results: Morning self-efficacy significantly predicted that day's exercise minutes (p < .0001). Morning positive outcome expectations were also associated with exercise minutes (p = .0003), but the relationship was attenuated when self-efficacy was included in the model (p = .4032). Morning negative outcome expectations were not associated with exercise minutes. Of the questionnaire measures of SCT variables, only exercise self-efficacy predicted exercise at the next time point (p = .003). Conclusions: The consistency of the relationship between self-efficacy and exercise minutes over short (same day) and longer (Tj to Tj-1) time periods provides support for a causal relationship. The strength of the relationship between morning self-efficacy and exercise minutes suggest that real-time interventions that target daily variation in self-efficacy may benefit endometrial cancer survivors' exercise adherence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
    Health Psychology 02/2013; · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Physical activity has been shown to benefit cancer survivors' physical functioning, emotional well-being, and symptoms. Physical activity may be of particular benefit to survivors of endometrial cancer because they are more likely to be obese and sedentary than the general population, as these are risk factors for the disease, and thus experience a number of related co-morbid health problems. However, there is little research systematically studying mechanisms of physical activity adherence in cancer survivor populations. This paper describes the design of the Steps to Health study, which applies a Social Cognitive Theory-based model of endometrial cancer survivors' adoption and maintenance of exercise in the context of an intervention to increase walking or other moderate intensity cardiovascular activity. In Steps to Health we will test the influence of self-efficacy and outcome expectations on adherence to exercise recommendations, as well as studying the determinants of self-efficacy. Endometrial cancer survivors who are at least 6 months post-treatment are provided with an intervention involving print materials and telephone counseling, and complete assessments of fitness, activity, self-efficacy and outcome expectations, and determinants of self-efficacy every two months for a six month period. In addition to testing an innovative model, the Steps to Health study employs multiple assessment methods, including ecological momentary assessment, implicit tests of cognitive variables, and ambulatory monitoring of physical activity. The study results can be used to develop more effective interventions for increasing physical activity in sedentary cancer survivors by taking into account the full complement of sources of self-efficacy information and outcome expectations.
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise 01/2011; 12(1):27-35. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to determine the prevalence of physical activity and obesity and their relationship to physical functioning (PF), fatigue, and pain in endometrial cancer survivors. Surveys were mailed to 200 survivors of endometrial cancer diagnosed within the last 5 years; 61% were returned. Surveys assessed physical activity, height and weight, comorbid health problems, PF, fatigue, and pain. In all, 22% exercised in the past month at the level of current public health recommendations, 41% reported no physical activity, and 38% reported some activity. A total of 16% were overweight and 50% were obese. Both lower body mass index (BMI) and higher physical activity were related to better PF. Higher physical activity was related to less fatigue, primarily for patients of normal BMI. Results suggest endometrial cancer survivors' obesity and inactivity contributes to poorer quality of life. This population could benefit from quality-of-life interventions incorporating physical activity.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 01/2009; 200(3):288.e1-8. · 3.28 Impact Factor