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Publications (5)21.7 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Titration experiments measuring the gene expression from two different tissues, along with total RNA mixtures of the pure samples, are frequently used for quality evaluation of microarray technologies. Such a design implies that the true mRNA expression of each gene, is either constant or follows a monotonic trend between the mixtures, applying itself to the use of order restricted inference procedures. Exploiting only the postulated monotonicity of titration designs, we propose three statistical analysis methods for the validation of high-throughput genetic data and corresponding preprocessing techniques. Our methods allow for inference of accuracy, repeatability and cross-platform agreement, with minimal required assumptions regarding the underlying data generating process. Therefore, they are readily applicable to all sorts of genetic high-throughput data independent of the degree of preprocessing. An application to the EMERALD dataset was used to demonstrate how our methods provide a rich spectrum of easily interpretable quality metrics and allow the comparison of different microarray technologies and normalization methods. The results are on par with previous work, but provide additional new insights that cast doubt on the utility of popular preprocessing techniques, specifically concerning the EMERALD projects dataset. All datasets are available on EBI's ArrayExpress web site http://www.ebi.ac.uk/microarray-as/ae/) under accession numbers E-TABM-536, E-TABM-554 and E-TABM-555. Source code implemented in C and R is available at: http://statistics.msi.meduniwien.ac.at/float/cross_platform/. Methods for testing and variance decomposition have been made available in the R-package orQA, which can be downloaded and installed from CRAN http://cran.r-project.org.
    Bioinformatics 02/2011; 27(7):953-60. · 5.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A major challenge in microarray design is the selection of highly specific oligonucleotide probes for all targeted genes of interest, while maintaining thermodynamic uniformity at the hybridization temperature. We introduce a novel microarray design framework (Thermodynamic Model-based Oligo Design Optimizer, TherMODO) that for the first time incorporates a number of advanced modelling features: (i) A model of position-dependent labelling effects that is quantitatively derived from experiment. (ii) Multi-state thermodynamic hybridization models of probe binding behaviour, including potential cross-hybridization reactions. (iii) A fast calibrated sequence-similarity-based heuristic for cross-hybridization prediction supporting large-scale designs. (iv) A novel compound score formulation for the integrated assessment of multiple probe design objectives. In contrast to a greedy search for probes meeting parameter thresholds, this approach permits an optimization at the probe set level and facilitates the selection of highly specific probe candidates while maintaining probe set uniformity. (v) Lastly, a flexible target grouping structure allows easy adaptation of the pipeline to a variety of microarray application scenarios. The algorithm and features are discussed and demonstrated on actual design runs. Source code is available on request.
    Nucleic Acids Research 01/2009; 37(3):e18. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While text-mining and distributed annotation systems both aim at capturing knowledge and presenting it in a standardized form, there have been few attempts to investigate potential synergies between these two fields. For instance, distributed annotation would be very well suited for providing topic focussed, expert knowledge enriched text corpora. A key limitation for this approach is the availability of literature annotation systems that can be routinely used by groups of collaborating researchers on a day to day basis, not distracting from the main focus of their work. For this purpose, we have designed BibGlimpse. Features like drop-to-file, SVM based automated retrieval of PubMed bibliography for PDF reprints, and annotation support make BibGlimpse an efficient, light-weight reprint manager that facilitates distributed literature research for work groups. Building on an established open search engine, full-text search and structured queries are supported, while at the same time making shared collections of annotated reprints accessible to literature classification and text-mining tools. BibGlimpse offers scientists a tool that enhances their own literature management. Moreover, it may be used to create content enriched, annotated text corpora for research in text-mining.
    BMC Bioinformatics 11/2008; 9:406. · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DNA Microarrays are regarded as a valuable tool for basic and applied research in microbiology. However, for many industrially important microorganisms the lack of commercially available microarrays still hampers physiological research. Exemplarily, our understanding of protein folding and secretion in the yeast Pichia pastoris is presently widely dependent on conclusions drawn from analogies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To close this gap for a yeast species employed for its high capacity to produce heterologous proteins, we developed full genome DNA microarrays for P. pastoris and analyzed the unfolded protein response (UPR) in this yeast species, as compared to S. cerevisiae. By combining the partially annotated gene list of P. pastoris with de novo gene finding a list of putative open reading frames was generated for which an oligonucleotide probe set was designed using the probe design tool TherMODO (a thermodynamic model-based oligoset design optimizer). To evaluate the performance of the novel array design, microarrays carrying the oligo set were hybridized with samples from treatments with dithiothreitol (DTT) or a strain overexpressing the UPR transcription factor HAC1, both compared with a wild type strain in normal medium as untreated control. DTT treatment was compared with literature data for S. cerevisiae, and revealed similarities, but also important differences between the two yeast species. Overexpression of HAC1, the most direct control for UPR genes, resulted in significant new understanding of this important regulatory pathway in P. pastoris, and generally in yeasts. The differences observed between P. pastoris and S. cerevisiae underline the importance of DNA microarrays for industrial production strains. P. pastoris reacts to DTT treatment mainly by the regulation of genes related to chemical stimulus, electron transport and respiration, while the overexpression of HAC1 induced many genes involved in translation, ribosome biogenesis, and organelle biosynthesis, indicating that the regulatory events triggered by DTT treatment only partially overlap with the reactions to overexpression of HAC1. The high reproducibility of the results achieved with two different oligo sets is a good indication for their robustness, and underlines the importance of less stringent selection of regulated features, in order to avoid a large number of false negative results.
    BMC Genomics 09/2008; 9:390. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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