M K Singh

Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York, United States

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Publications (2)1.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The inclusion of donor middle hepatic vein (MHV) in right-lobe living-donor grafts and the need for reconstruction of the MHV tributaries have long been controversial areas in living-donor liver transplantation. We report technical details in restoration of venous drainage of the anterior sector (segments V and VIII) of the right lobe of the liver graft using a preserved MHV from the recipient liver, and address the issue of reconstruction of donor MHV tributaries without use of an interposition graft. We review clinical situations in which restoration of outflow drainage of the anterior segment of the liver graft should be considered.
    Transplantation Proceedings 07/2009; 41(5):1687-90. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal wall closure after liver transplantation is not always feasible and may result in increased intra-abdominal pressure along with associated complications. Various temporary closure techniques as well as open wound management have been used to address this complex problem. The aim of this series was to describe an approach to definitive wound closure of the open abdomen in liver transplant patients. We performed a retrospective review of all liver transplant patients at our institution from September 2005 to November 2007. The management of the open abdomen in 10 liver transplant patients was reviewed, and a novel approach described to manage these defects. Ten patients with open wounds were closed during the study period using human acellular dermal matrix (HADM). There were 7 men and 3 women of median age 55 years. Average size of HADM was 235 cm(2). The median follow-up is 10 months with no incidence of evisceration or hernia. In 1 patient, the graft failed along the lateral side due to infection; it dislodged during vacuum-assisted closure dressing change in another patient at 5 months after closure. Fascial closure was not possible due to organ edema (n = 3), a large liver (n = 4) or wound infection with dehiscence (n = 3). HADM can be used for primary wound closure in both clean and contaminated wounds as an alternative to an open abdomen post-liver transplantation.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2009; 40(10):3541-4. · 0.95 Impact Factor