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Publications (2)6.36 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to analyse the interaction between asthma and smoking in the risk of adult airway obstruction, accounting for atopy. In the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, 15 668 persons aged 20-56 years underwent spirometry in 1991-1993 and 9 years later (n = 8916). Risk of airway obstruction and lung function decline associated with smoking and early-onset (<10 years of age) and late-onset (>10 years of age) asthma were analysed with generalised estimating equation models and random-effect linear models, adjusting for covariates. Interaction of asthma with smoking was expressed as relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). A 20-fold increase in adult airway obstruction was found among those with early-onset asthma independently of smoking status (never smokers: OR 21.0, 95% CI 12.7-35; current smokers: OR 23.7, 95% CI 13.9-40.6). Late-onset asthma was associated with airway obstruction, with a stronger association among current smokers (OR 25.6, 95% CI 15.6-41.9) than among never-smokers (OR 11.2, 95% CI 6.8-18.6) (RERI 12.02, 95% CI 1.96-22.07). Stratifying by atopy, the association between smoking and asthma was most pronounced among nonatopics. Early- and late-onset asthma were associated with 10-20-fold increased risk of adult airway obstruction. Smoking increased the risk of adult airway obstruction in subjects with asthma onset after age 10 years. Investigation of measures potentially preventive of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease development following asthma is urgently needed. ©ERS.
    The European respiratory journal. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of childhood respiratory infections on adult respiratory health. In 1992-1994, the European Community Respiratory Health Survey recruited community based samples of 20-44-yr-old people from 48 centres in 22 countries. Study participants completed questionnaires and underwent lung function testing. On average, 8.9 yrs later, 29 centres re-investigated their samples using similar methods. Mixed effects models comprising an estimate for the random variation between centres were used to evaluate the relevant associations. In total, 9,175 patients participated in both studies, of whom 10.9% reported serious respiratory infections (SRI) before 5 yrs of age and 2.8% reported hospitalisation for lung disease (HLD) before 2 yrs if age. SRI was associated with current wheeze (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-2.2), asthma (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.2-3.1), and lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1); 89 mL; 95% CI 54-126), forced vital capacity (FVC; 49 mL; 95% CI 8-90) and FEV(1)/FVC ratio (-1.2%; 95% CI -1.8- -0.6). Childhood respiratory infections were also associated with new asthma (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.03-2.0), new wheeze (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.4) and persistent wheeze (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.6) but not with a decline in lung function. Similar findings were observed for HDL. These associations were significantly consistent across centres. SRI was associated with lower FEV(1) when excluding ever asthmatics and current wheezers. The impact of early infections was significantly larger in subjects exposed to maternal or active smoking. The impact of childhood respiratory infections on the respiratory system may not only last into adulthood but also influence development and persistence of adult respiratory morbidity.
    European Respiratory Journal 11/2008; 33(2):237-44. · 6.36 Impact Factor