Kathy Huppler Hullsiek

University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota, United States

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Publications (2)34.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Presence of low-frequency, or minority, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance mutations may adversely affect response to antiretroviral treatment (ART), but evidence regarding the effects of such mutations on the effectiveness of first-line ART is conflicting. To evaluate the association of preexisting drug-resistant HIV-1 minority variants with risk of first-line nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral virologic failure. Systematic review of published and unpublished studies in PubMed (1966 through December 2010), EMBASE (1974 through December 2010), conference abstracts, and article references. Authors of all studies were contacted for detailed laboratory, ART, and adherence data. Studies involving ART-naive participants initiating NNRTI-based regimens were included. Participants were included if all drugs in their ART regimen were fully active by standard HIV drug resistance testing. Cox proportional hazard models using pooled patient-level data were used to estimate the risk of virologic failure based on a Prentice weighted case-cohort analysis stratified by study. Individual data from 10 studies and 985 participants were available for the primary analysis. Low-frequency drug resistance mutations were detected in 187 participants, including 117 of 808 patients in the cohort studies. Low-frequency HIV-1 drug resistance mutations were associated with an increased risk of virologic failure (hazard ratio (HR], 2.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.7-3.3]; P < .001) after controlling for medication adherence, race/ethnicity, baseline CD4 cell count, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Increased risk of virologic failure was most strongly associated with minority variants resistant to NNRTIs (HR, 2.6 [95% CI, 1.9-3.5]; P < .001). Among participants from the cohort studies, 35% of those with detectable minority variants experienced virologic failure compared with 15% of those without minority variants. The presence of minority variants was associated with 2.5 to 3 times the risk of virologic failure at either 95% or greater or less than 95% overall medication adherence. A dose-dependent increased risk of virologic failure was found in participants with a higher proportion or quantity of drug-resistant variants. In a pooled analysis, low-frequency HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, particularly involving NNRTI resistance, were significantly associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of virologic failure with first-line ART.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 04/2011; 305(13):1327-35. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interruption of a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-regimen is often necessary, but must be performed with caution because NNRTIs have a low genetic barrier to resistance. Limited data exist to guide clinical practice on the best interruption strategy to use. Patients in the drug-conservation arm of the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) trial who interrupted a fully suppressive NNRTI-regimen were evaluated. From 2003, SMART recommended interruption of an NNRTI by a staggered interruption, in which the NNRTI was stopped before the NRTIs, or by replacing the NNRTI with another drug before interruption. Simultaneous interruption of all antiretrovirals was discouraged. Resuppression rates 4-8 months after reinitiating NNRTI-therapy were assessed, as was the detection of drug-resistance mutations within 2 months of the treatment interruption in a subset (N = 141). Overall, 601/688 (87.4%) patients who restarted an NNRTI achieved viral resuppression. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for achieving resuppression was 1.94 (1.02-3.69) for patients with a staggered interruption and 3.64 (1.37-9.64) for those with a switched interruption compared with patients with a simultaneous interruption. At least one NNRTI-mutation was detected in the virus of 16.4% patients with simultaneous interruption, 12.5% patients with staggered interruption and 4.2% patients with switched interruption. Fewer patients with detectable mutations (i.e. 69.2%) achieved HIV-RNA of 400 copies/ml or less compared with those in whom no mutations were detected (i.e. 86.7%; P = 0.05). In patients who interrupt a suppressive NNRTI-regimen, the choice of interruption strategy may influence resuppression rates when restarting a similar regimen. NNRTI drug-resistance mutations were observed in a relatively high proportion of patients. These data provide additional support for a staggered or switched interruption strategy for NNRTI drugs.
    AIDS (London, England) 12/2008; 22(17):2279-89. · 4.91 Impact Factor