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Publications (5)17.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated to simultaneously quantify six aqueous choline-related compounds and eight major phospholipids classes in a single run. HILIC chromatography was coupled to positive ion electrospray mass spectrometry. A combination of multiple scan modes including precursor ion scan, neutral loss scan and multiple reaction monitoring was optimized for the determination of each compound or class in a single LC/MS run. This work developed a simplified extraction scheme in which both free choline and related compounds along with phospholipids were extracted into a homogenized phase using chloroform/methanol/water (1:2:0.8) and diluted into methanol for the analysis of target compounds in a variety of sample matrices. The analyte recoveries were evaluated by spiking tissues and food samples with two isotope-labeled internal standards, PC-d(3) and Cho-d(3). Recoveries of between 90% and 115% were obtained by spiking a range of sample matrices with authentic standards containing all 14 of the target analytes. The precision of the analysis ranged from 1.6% to 13%. Accuracy and precision was comparable to that obtained by quantification of selected phospholipid classes using (31)P NMR. A variety of sample matrices including egg yolks, human diets and animal tissues were analyzed using the validated method. The measurements of total choline in selected foods were found to be in good agreement with values obtained from the USDA choline database.
    Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences 12/2012; 911C:170-179. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trans-11 vaccenic acid (VA) is the predominant trans isomer in ruminant fat and a major precursor to the endogenous synthesis of cis9,trans11-conjugated linoleic acid in humans and animals. We have previously shown that 3-wk VA supplementation has a triglyceride (TG)-lowering effect in a rat model of dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome (JCR:LA-cp rats). The objective of this study was to assess the chronic effect (16 wk) of VA on lipid homeostasis in both the liver and intestine in obese JCR:LA-cp rats. Plasma TG (P < 0.001), total cholesterol (P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (P < 0.01), and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations, as well as the serum haptoglobin concentration, were all lower in obese rats fed the VA diet compared with obese controls (P < 0.05). In addition, there was a decrease in the postprandial plasma apolipoprotein (apo)B48 area under the curve (P < 0.05) for VA-treated obese rats compared with obese controls. The hepatic TG concentration and the relative abundance of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase proteins were all lower (P < 0.05) in the VA-treated group compared with obese controls. Following acute gastrointestinal infusion of a VA-triolein emulsion in obese rats that had been fed the control diet for 3 wk, the TG concentration was reduced by 40% (P < 0.05) and the number of chylomicron (CM) particles (apoB48) in nascent mesenteric lymph was reduced by 30% (P < 0.01) relative to rats infused with a triolein emulsion alone. In conclusion, chronic VA supplementation significantly improved dyslipidemia in both the food-deprived and postprandial state in JCR:LA-cp rats. The appreciable hypolipidemic benefits of VA may be attributed to a reduction in both intestinal CM and hepatic de novo lipogenesis pathways.
    Journal of Nutrition 09/2009; 139(11):2049-54. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trans-11 vaccenic acid [VA; 18:1(n-9)] is a positional and geometric isomer of oleic acid and is the precursor to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in humans. Despite VA being the predominant trans monoene in ruminant-derived lipids, very little is known about its nutritional bioactivity, particularly in conditions of chronic metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, and/or dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of VA to improve dyslipidemia, insulin sensitivity, or inflammatory status in obese and insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats. The obese rats and age-matched lean littermates were fed a control diet or a control diet supplemented with 1.5% (wt:wt) VA for a period of 3 wk. The incorporation of VA and subsequent conversion to CLA in triglyceride was measured in adipose tissue. Glucose and insulin metabolism were assessed via a conscious adapted meal tolerance test procedure. Plasma lipids as well as serum inflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured by commercially available assays. VA supplementation did not result in any observable adverse health effects in either lean or obese JCR:LA-cp rats. After 3 wk of feeding, body weight, food intake, and glucose/insulin metabolism did not differ between VA-supplemented and control groups. The incorporation of VA and CLA into adipose triglycerides in obese rats fed VA increased by 1.5-fold and 6.5-fold, respectively, compared with obese rats fed the control diet. The most striking effect was a 40% decrease (P < 0.05) in fasting triglyceride concentrations in VA-treated obese rats relative to obese controls. Serum Il-10 concentration was decreased by VA, regardless of genotype (P < 0.05). In conclusion, short-term dietary supplementation of 1.5% VA did not result in any detrimental metabolic effects in JCR:LA-cp rats. In contrast, dietary VA had substantial hypo-triglyceridemic effects, suggesting a new bioactivity of this fatty acid that is typically found in ruminant-derived food products.
    Journal of Nutrition 11/2008; 138(11):2117-22. · 4.20 Impact Factor
  • Atherosclerosis Supplements 09/2008; 9(2):101-101. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of long-term supplementation with arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) on cell phenotypes and cytokine production in children. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial provided children, (ages 5-7 years; n = 37) who had low intakes of DHA, with a dietary supplement containing AA (20-30 mg daily) and DHA (14-21 mg daily) or a placebo supplement for 7 months. After the supplementation period, a series of stimulants (pokeweed mitogen, phytohemagluttinin, lipopolysaccharide, beta-lactoglobulin, and ibuprofen) was used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells ex vivo. Antigen expression on T cells (CD25 and CD80), B cells, and macrophages (CD54), as well as cytokine production (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor, IL-2, IL-6, and interferon-gamma), were measured using flow cytometry, monoclonal antibodies, and cytometric bead array, respectively. Mononuclear cells from children provided long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) had fewer CD8+ cells expressing CD25 and CD80 compared with placebo after exposure to each mitogen. The LCPUFA group also exhibited lower proportions of CD14+ cells after stimulation with beta-lactoglobulin and ibuprofen. The proportion of CD54+ cells was 2-fold higher for the LCPUFA group compared with placebo after exposure to ibuprofen and beta-lactoglobulin (P < 0.05). Each of these immune effects related to the amount of AA and/or DHA in the plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids. Alterations in cell phenotypes were evident when children were supplemented with AA and DHA. The results of this study have important implications for immune development and sensitivity to antigens in children.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 05/2008; 46(5):570-9. · 2.18 Impact Factor