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Publications (7)6.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The primary purpose of this experimental study was to compare intubation times for direct laryngoscopy with a Miller blade and for 3 VL: GlideScope(®) videolaryngoscope, Airtraq(®), and McGrath(®). Seventy-seven operators, with various experience of pediatric tracheal intubation (from none to expert), performed 10 attempts of orotracheal intubation with each device on an infant manikin. The main outcome was intubation time and secondary outcome was failure rate. There was a significant decrease in intubation time from the first to the 10th intubation attempt with all devices (P<0.05). This decrease was no more significant following the third attempt with VL and following the fifth attempt with DL. At the time of the 10th attempt, intubation time was significantly shorter with Airtraq(®) as compared with all the other devices (P<0.05), but the differences were tight. Failure was significantly more frequent with DL. In this infant manikin model, the learning curve of the different VL was 3 attempts and the Airtraq(®) VL appears the airway device enabling the quickest orotracheal intubation. These experimental results need to be confirmed by clinical studies in infants and children.
    Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation 10/2013; · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The primary purpose of this experimental study was to compare intubation times for direct laryngoscopy with a Miller blade and for 3 VL: GlideScope® videolaryngoscope, Airtraq®, and McGrath®. Methods Seventy-seven operators, with various experience of pediatric tracheal intubation (from none to expert), performed 10 attempts of orotracheal intubation with each device on an infant manikin. The main outcome was intubation time and secondary outcome was failure rate. Results There was a significant decrease in intubation time from the first to the 10th intubation attempt with all devices (P < 0.05). This decrease was no more significant following the third attempt with VL and following the fifth attempt with DL. At the time of the 10th attempt, intubation time was significantly shorter with Airtraq® as compared with all the other devices (P < 0.05), but the differences were tight. Failure was significantly more frequent with DL. Conclusion In this infant manikin model, the learning curve of the different VL was 3 attempts and the Airtraq® VL appears the airway device enabling the quickest orotracheal intubation. These experimental results need to be confirmed by clinical studies in infants and children.
    Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation 01/2013; 32(12):844–849. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abdominal vascular injuries following a serious falling out are quite rare in children. They can lead to haemorrhagic shock whose etiological diagnosis may be difficult in children in case of multiple trauma. The current management of abdominal injuries in the child is usually conservative, surgery being indicated in haemodynamically unstable patients. We report the case of a 7-year-old girl who presented with abdominal trauma with rupture of the hepatic artery and shredding of the splenic vein following a falling out of 10 meters. Aggressive resuscitation associated with early laparotomy for haemostasis, contrary to usual practices advocated in such a context, have helped control the hemorrhagic shock and stabilize the haemodynamic status of the child. The subsequent evolution was favourable, with full recovery. While a conservative attitude usually prevails in the management of traumatic intra abdominal bleeding in children an interventional attitude with emergency surgery must be sometimes considered.
    Annales francaises d'anesthesie et de reanimation 05/2010; 29(5):387-90. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to evaluate early minimal enteral feeding (MEF) and gradual enteral nutrition increment on neonatal outcome of gastroschisis. An intervention group was prospectively assessed and compared with an observational historical control group. The prospective study relied on a new protocol of enteral nutrition. According to the new protocol, MEF was initiated 5 days after bowel reintegration and milk amounts were increased 12 mL/kg/day. In the control group, enteral nutrition was delayed until resolution of postoperative ileus, and increment of feeding was not systematized. Twenty-two patients were included in the MEF group and compared with 51 control patients. Infants in the control group had lower gestational age (36 vs 35 gestational weeks [GW], P=0.03) and birth weight (2465 vs 2200 g, P=0.05). Time to first enteral nutrition (5 vs 11.5 days, P=0.0005) was significantly shorter in the MEF group. All patients in this group were fully enteral fed at day 60, though 30.4% of patients in the control group still needed parenteral nutrition at day 60 (P=0.004). Incidence of nosocomial infection was reduced (9% of patients vs 40%, P=0.016) and hospital stay tended to be shorter in the MEF group (40 vs 54.5 days, P=0.08). In the univariate analysis, factors influencing the length of parenteral nutrition during the 2 periods were the severity of perivisceritis and new nutritional protocol. In the multivariate analysis, only nutritional protocol was significantly associated with the length of parenteral nutrition (P=0.038). Early MEF and controlled increase of nutritional elements after bowel reintegration significantly improved outcome of gastroschisis in newborns.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 05/2009; 48(5):612-7. · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intestinal transplantation (IT) is the newest and most difficult of organ transplantations. The first ever (1987) and the longest surviving (1989) IT were performed in our institution. However, IT still has to demonstrate its benefit to children on long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). We tried to clarify this aspect by looking back at our 13 years' experience. From 1994 to December 2007, 74 IT were performed in 69 children, 39 with an isolated small bowel (IT), 35 combined with a liver transplant (LITx). The indications were: short bowel syndrome (n = 25), congenital mucosal diseases (n = 22), and motility disorders (n = 22). Median age at transplantation was 5 years (1 - 17 years). Follow-up was 1 to 12 years (median 5 years). Thirty-one children have a functioning graft (42 %), 15/39 IT, 16/35 LITx. They are at home without PN, with a good quality of life. One child is PN-dependent 1.5 years post IT. Post IT, 16 children were detransplanted: 12 early on (1 for mechanical complications, 11 because of resistant rejection; 3 less than 3 years, one 9 years post SBT (chronic rejection). In 2 noncompliant teenagers, PN was reintroduced (one was detransplanted later on). Several years post LITx, 2 children underwent bowel detransplantation due to an acute viral infection complicated with rejection. Twenty-two children died (32 %, 8 IT, 14 LITx), 18 early on from infectious or surgical complications, 4 more than 1 year post IT, 3 after retransplantation (1 in another unit). Bad prognostic factors are multiple previous surgeries, an older age (> 7 y), and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Complications post IT are frequent and life-threatening, especially early on: rejection (IT), infections (LITx). Later on, the rate of complications decreases but remains significant, especially in noncompliant patients. However we describe here a 13-year learning curve; the recent results are encouraging with regard to control of rejection and viral infections. Intestinal transplantation is indicated only in selected patients in whom long-term PN cannot be performed safely any more. In every child with intestinal insufficiency, the therapeutic strategy must be discussed early on in order to perform IT at the right time under optimal conditions. IT should evolve from being a "rescue" procedure to becoming a true therapeutic option.
    European Journal of Pediatric Surgery 12/2008; 18(6):368-71. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of patients with total intestinal aganglionosis (TIA) is a medical challenge because of their dependency on parenteral nutrition (PN). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) represents the only alternative treatment for patients with irreversible intestinal failure for achieving intestinal autonomy. Among 66 patients who underwent ITx in our center, 12 had TIA. They received either isolated ITx (n = 4) or liver-ITx (LITx, n = 8) after 10 to 144 months of total PN. All grafts included the right colon. After a median follow-up of 57 months, the survival rate was 62.5% in the LITx group and 100% in the ITx patients. The graft survival rate was 62.5% in the LITx group and 75% in the ITx group. All the surviving patients were fully weaned from total PN, after a median of 57 days. Pull through of the colon allograft was carried out in all patients. Fecal continence is normal in all but one of the surviving children. These results suggest that ITx with colon grafting should be the preferred therapeutic option in TIA. Early referral to a transplantation center after diagnosis of TIA is critical to prevent PN-related cirrhosis and thereby to permit ITx, which is associated with a good survival rate.
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery 11/2008; 43(10):1833-8. · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Archives De Pediatrie - ARCHIVES PEDIATRIE. 01/2008; 15(5):897-897.