Damiano Soma

Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Sardinia, Italy

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Publications (7)11.48 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In this randomised controlled clinical trial, 2 homogeneous groups of patients with facial asymmetry (n=10 in each) were treated by either classic or computer-assisted orthognathic corrective surgery. Differences between the 2 groups in the alignment of the lower interincisal point (p=0.03), mandibular sagittal plane (p=0.01), and centring of the dental midlines (p=0.03) were significant, with the digital planning group being more accurate.
    British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 01/2014; · 2.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors evaluate the use of an osteomyocutaneous fibula free flap, combined in a chimeric fashion, with a lateral supramalleolar flap, in 10 patients with composite head and neck defects. All reconstructions were performed successfully. With the exception of one patient who died after disease recurrence, all patients were decannulated and resumed an oral diet. Speech intelligibility was good in seven of 10 patients. Dental implants were used in two of 10 patients, with a total of 10 fixtures placed successfully. The donor site healed without complications in all except one case, where necrosis of the skin graft occurred with fungal infection. The chimeric lateral supramalleolar artery perforator fibula free flap may be a valid option for maximizing the quality of life in patients with composite oromandibular defects. Therapeutic, IV.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery 01/2014; 133(1):130-6. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512.
    International Journal of Dentistry 01/2013; 2013:790648.
  • Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery: official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 06/2012; · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reconstruction of moderate-sized mucosal defects of the oral cavity/oropharynx represents a surgical challenge. The most widely used reconstructive techniques are skin grafts, local or regional pedicled flaps, and free flaps, but they do not provide mucosal sensitivity, mobility, volume, or texture similar to that of native tissue. The cheek myomucosal flaps seem to provide "ideal reconstruction" because they carry a thin, mobile, well-vascularized, and sensitive tissue, like those excised or lost. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the indications for the advantages and disadvantages of 6 types of buccinator myomucosal flaps which are possible to raise from the cheek mucosa. METHODS: Sixty-nine buccinator myomucosal flaps were performed on 66 patients with moderate-sized postoncologic and posttraumatic oral and oropharyngeal defects. RESULTS: In all cases except 1, flaps were successfully used with excellent oncological and functional results. CONCLUSION: Buccinator myomucosal flaps can be considered "ideal flaps" for three-dimensional oral and oropharyngeal reconstructions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2012.
    Head & Neck 01/2012; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Frontal sinus and supraorbital rim fractures are common in facial trauma patients. Coronal incision is the standard approach for surgical management of these injuries. Nevertheless, with this incision, complications can occur as wide scars and alopecia. Because surgical repair of fronto-orbital fractures is often indicated for aesthetic reasons, surgical incision might be an "aesthetic incision." So we have adopted the pretrichial incision, already used in brow-lift and foreheadplasty but never described in craniomaxillofacial trauma surgery. Nineteen upper-third facial trauma patients were treated: five cases were approached via an existing laceration, four cases via a coronal incision, and 10 cases via a unilateral zigzag pretrichial incision. To assess the postsurgical scar, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale was used and the scar's width was measured. In all cases, a wide surgical field was obtained to perform correct fracture reduction. Unlike straight or stealth coronal incisions, with pretrichial incision no wide scar or alopecia was registered. We think that pretrichial incision is an aesthetically reasonable alternative to the standard coronal approach for craniomaxillofacial trauma patients.
    Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction 09/2011; 4(3):161-70.
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    ABSTRACT: In this retrospective study, the authors compare the outcomes of two different approaches to the orbital floor: the classic subciliary versus the transconjunctival plus lateral canthotomy (swinging eyelid). Forty-five patients who underwent orbital surgery (47 approaches) for different indications (orbital fractures, correction of Grave's exophthalmos, tumours of the internal orbit and correction of enophthalmos in secondary trauma) were placed in two groups, depending on the approach. The long-term effects of the incisions, the outcome of the approach and the complications were recorded and compared. The minimum follow-up for inclusion in the study was 1 year. Twenty-three orbits underwent subciliary incision, and 24 underwent swinging eyelid. No ectropion or entropion was seen in any patient. For the swinging eyelid approach, complications included three cases (12.5%) of canthal malposition; for the subciliary approach, five cases (21.14%) of lagophthalmos and 10 visible scars were observed. Our findings show the advantages of the swinging eyelid: better aesthetic results, the same or greater exposure of the orbital floor and the caudal part of the lateral and medial walls, shorter surgical time (sutureless) and a less extended scar. Although in our experience this approach is preferable in orbital surgery, some indications for the subciliary still remain.
    Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery 11/2008; 36(8):439-42. · 1.61 Impact Factor