Oleg Kambur

University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Province of Southern Finland, Finland

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Publications (11)35.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the methods and results of the early part (experimental pain tests and postoperative analgesia) of a study that assesses genetic and other factors related to acute pain and persistent pain after treatment of breast cancer in a prospective cohort of 1,000 women. One thousand consenting patients were recruited to the study. Before surgery (breast resection or mastectomy with axillary surgery), the patients filled in questionnaires about health, life style, depression (Beck Depression Inventory), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory). They were also exposed to experimental tests measuring heat (43° and 48°C, 5 s) and cold (2-4°C) pain intensity and tolerance. Anesthesia was standardized with propofol and remifentanil, and postoperative analgesia was optimized with i.v. oxycodone. The patients showed significant interindividual variation in heat and cold pain sensitivity and cold pain tolerance. There was a strong correlation between the experimental pain measures across the tests. Presence of chronic pain, the number of previous operations, and particularly state anxiety were related to increased pain sensitivity. Previous smoking correlated with decreased heat pain sensitivity. These factors explained 4-5% of the total variance in pain sensitivity in these tests. Oxycodone consumption during 20 h was significantly higher in patients who had axillary clearance. Oxycodone consumption had only a weak correlation with the experimental pain measures. Contact heat and cold pressure tests identify variability in pain sensitivity which is modified by factors such as anxiety, chronic pain, previous surgery, and smoking. High levels of anxiety are connected to increased pain sensitivity in experimental and acute postoperative pain.In a study of 1,000 women undergoing breast surgery for cancer, a small portion of the variance in preoperative response to noxious heat and cold testing could be explained by anxiety, the presence of chronic pain, and the number of previous operations. There was a weak correlation between response to experimental pain testing and acute postoperative pain, with largely similar predictive factors across both.
    Anesthesiology 12/2013; 119(6):1410-21. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamines in different tissues. Polymorphisms in COMT gene can attenuate COMT activity and increase sensitivity to pain. Human studies exploring the effect of COMT polymorphisms on pain sensitivity have mostly included small, heterogeneous samples and have ignored several important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This study examines the effect of COMT polymorphisms on experimental and postoperative pain phenotypes in a large ethnically homogeneous female patient cohort. Intensity of cold (+2-4°C) and heat (+48°C) pain and tolerance to cold pain were assessed in 1,000 patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Acute postoperative pain and oxycodone requirements were recorded. Twenty-two COMT SNPs were genotyped and their association with six pain phenotypes analyzed with linear regression. There was no association between any of the tested pain phenotypes and SNP rs4680. The strongest association signals were seen between rs165774 and heat pain intensity as well as rs887200 and cold pain intensity. In both cases, minor allele carriers reported less pain. Neither of these results remained significant after strict multiple testing corrections. When analyzed further, the effect of rs887200 was, however, shown to be significant and consistent throughout the cold pressure test. No evidence of association between the SNPs and postoperative oxycodone consumption was found. SNPs rs887200 and rs165774 located in the untranslated regions of the gene had the strongest effects on pain sensitivity. Their effect on pain is described here for the first time. These results should be confirmed in further studies and the potential functional mechanisms of the variants studied.
    Anesthesiology 12/2013; 119(6):1422-33. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Systemic infusion of therapeutic cells would be the most practical and least invasive method of administration in many cellular therapies. One of the main obstacles especially in intravenous delivery of cells is a massive cell retention in the lungs, which impairs homing to the target tissue and may decrease the therapeutic outcome. In this study we showed that an alternative cell detachment of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with pronase instead of trypsin significantly accelerated the lung clearance of the cells and, importantly, increased their targeting to an area of injury. Cell detachment with pronase transiently altered the MSC surface protein profile without compromising cell viability, multipotent cell characteristics, or immunomodulative and angiogenic potential. The transient modification of the cell surface protein profile was sufficient to produce effective changes in cell rolling behavior in vitro and, importantly, in the in vivo biodistribution of the cells in mouse, rat, and porcine models. In conclusion, pronase detachment could be used as a method to improve the MSC lung clearance and targeting in vivo. This may have a major impact on the bioavailability of MSCs in future therapeutic regimes.
    Stem cells translational medicine. 06/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Opioid analgesics are effective in the treatment of chronic pain, but they have serious adverse effects such as development of tolerance and dependence. Adrenergic α(2) agonists and μ-opioid receptor agonists show synergistic potentiation and cross-tolerance in spinal analgesia, whereas α(2)-adrenergic antagonists have shown pronociceptive effects. However, at ultralow doses, spinal α(2)-adrenergic antagonists have been reported to paradoxically enhance opioid antinociception. New data have suggested a functional μ-opioid-α(2)-adrenoceptor complex, which may help in interpreting the paradoxical effect of the α(2)-adrenergic antagonists. In the present study we assessed the effects of low doses of atipamezole, a nonselective α(2)-adrenergic antagonist, on both systemic and spinal morphine antinociception and tolerance. Antinociception was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats using hotplate, tail-flick, and paw pressure tests. Spinal or systemic opioid tolerance was induced for 4 days. The effects of both intrathecal and subcutaneous atipamezole on acute morphine-induced antinociception and established morphine tolerance were studied. Systemic or spinal atipamezole itself did not produce antinociception at the doses studied (subcutaneous 0.03, 0.3, 3 μg/kg or intrathecal 0.1, 1, 10 ng). The combined administration of spinal morphine and 1 ng of atipamezole increased the antinociceptive effect of acute spinal morphine 30 minutes after the administration of test drugs in the tail-flick test. Furthermore, 10 ng of intrathecal atipamezole attenuated established morphine tolerance 30 minutes after the administration of test drugs in the tail-flick test. However, subcutaneous atipamezole had no significant effect on systemic morphine antinociception, and it did not attenuate morphine tolerance. Spinal coadministration of low doses of atipamezole augmented the antinociceptive effect of morphine in naïve and tolerant rats. Heterodimerization of μ-opioid- and α(2A)-adrenoceptors with consequent changes in function and interaction could explain these results. This also suggests an interesting explanation for the variability in opioid response and tolerance in patients experiencing stress or having an increased noradrenergic tone due to other causes, e.g., drugs.
    Anesthesia and analgesia 05/2012; 114(6):1353-8. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathic pain is caused by damage or malfunctioning of the nervous system. It is fairly common and more resistant to treatment than other types of pain. Since nitecapone, an inhibitor of catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT), has decreased neuropathic symptoms in diabetic rats, we studied its effects in another model of neuropathic pain, the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. Spinal nerves L5-6 were ligated in male Wistar rats under anaesthesia to produce the SNL model of neuropathic pain. Nitecapone (30 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle was administered once daily starting either 1h before or 2 days after surgery and continued for 14-19 days. Threshold for mechanical allodynia was measured with the digital von Frey test and responses to cold stimuli with the acetone test, before surgery and every other day after it 1h before drug administration. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed in all study groups. Both nitecapone treatments significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and withdrawal thresholds were 80-95% higher compared with the control group. In the acetone test, both nitecapone groups also showed less signs of cold allodynia than the control groups. In nitecapone-naïve animals a single dose of nitecapone also reduced mechanical allodynia on the 14th day after the surgery. Nitecapone reduced the symptoms of neuropathic pain after the SNL, which is in line with the earlier study. Our results suggest that nitecapone and other COMT inhibitors should be studied further in the treatment of neuropathic pain.
    European journal of pain (London, England) 01/2011; 15(7):732-40. · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Pain Supplements 01/2011; 5(1):249-249.
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    ABSTRACT: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors are used in Parkinson's disease in which pain is an important symptom. COMT polymorphisms modulate pain and opioid analgesia in humans. In rats, COMT inhibitors have been shown to be pro-nociceptive in acute pain models, but also to attenuate allodynia and hyperalgesia in a model of diabetic neuropathy. Here, we have assessed the effects of acute and repeated administrations of COMT inhibitors on mechanical, thermal and carrageenan-induced nociception in male mice. We used single and repeated administration of a peripherally restricted, short-acting (nitecapone) and also a centrally acting (3,5-dinitrocatechol, OR-486) COMT inhibitor. We also tested CGP 28014, an indirect inhibitor of COMT enzyme. Effects of OR-486 on thermal nociception were also studied in COMT deficient mice. Effects on spinal pathways were assessed in rats given intrathecal nitecapone. After single administration, both nitecapone and OR-486 reduced mechanical nociceptive thresholds and thermal nociceptive latencies (hot plate test) at 2 and 3 h, regardless of their brain penetration. These effects were still present after chronic treatment with COMT inhibitors for 5 days. Intraplantar injection of carrageenan reduced nociceptive latencies and both COMT inhibitors potentiated this reduction without modifying inflammation. CGP 28014 shortened paw flick latencies. OR-486 did not modify hot plate times in Comt gene deficient mice. Intrathecal nitecapone modified neither thermal nor mechanical nociception. Pro-nociceptive effects of COMT inhibitors were confirmed. The pro-nociceptive effects were primarily mediated via mechanisms acting outside the brain and spinal cord. COMT protein was required for these actions.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 12/2010; 161(7):1553-65. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has soluble (S-COMT) and membrane bound (MB-COMT) isoforms. Our aims were to assess the behavioral phenotype of S-COMT mutant mice and to clarify the role of MB-COMT in dopamine metabolism in different brain areas. Behavioral phenotype of the S-COMT mutant mice was assessed using a test battery designed to describe anxiety phenotype, spontaneous locomotor activity, sensorymotor gating, social behavior, and pain sensitivity. Microdialysis was used to explore the effect of S-COMT deficiency on extracellular dopamine under an L: -dopa load (carbidopa /L: -dopa 30/10 mg/kg i.p.). In behavioral tests, mature adult S-COMT mutants that only possessed MB-COMT exhibited enhanced acoustic startle without alterations in sensorimotor gating. They also showed barbering of vibrissae and nonaggressive social dominance, suggesting a change in their social interactions. In addition, S-COMT deficiency slightly and sex-dependently affected spinal pain reflex and the effect of morphine on hot-plate latency. In microdialysis studies under L: -dopa load, S-COMT mutants of both sexes had higher accumbal dopamine levels, but male S-COMT mutant mice showed paradoxically lower prefrontal cortical dopamine concentrations than wild-type animals. S-COMT deficiency induced the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in all brain areas, which was accentuated after L: -dopa loading. The lack of S-COMT decreased extracellular homovanillic acid levels. However, after L: -dopa loading, homovanillic acid concentrations in the prefrontal cortex of S-COMT mutants were similar to those of wild-type mice. A lack of S-COMT has a notable, albeit small, brain-area and sex-dependent effect on the O-methylation of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the mouse brain. It also induces subtle changes in mouse social interaction behaviors and nociception.
    Psychopharmacology 09/2010; 211(4):389-401. · 4.06 Impact Factor
  • Oleg Kambur, Pekka T Männistö
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    ABSTRACT: In animals, different types of COMT inhibitors, irrespective of their brain penetration, are pro-nociceptive in several models of acute and inflammatory pain. Similarly, COMT knock-out mice are more sensitive to nociceptive stimuli, whereas in mice over-expressing a high activity COMT variant nociceptive sensitivity is decreased. COMT knock-out mice also show altered response to opioids and stress-induced analgesia. In different rat models of neuropathic pain, the action of nitecapone is opposite: it is antinociceptive and antiallodynic. Complex actions of low COMT activity may be caused by enhanced adrenergic and dopaminergic activities that play different and even contrasting roles at different parts of the nociceptive system. Also compensatory changes in other neurotransmitters may occur. Pro-nociceptive effects seem to be caused by increased activation of peripheral adrenergic β(2)- and β(3) -receptors. Other properties of COMT inhibitors, like scavenging of oxygen and nitrogen radicals, may be important in antiallodynic effects found in neuropathic pain models. Increased number of µ-opioid receptors in certain brain areas may be responsible of enhanced opioid effects associated with a low COMT activity. In human pain studies, a low COMT activity is often associated with increased pain sensitivity in experimental pain models and with increased pre- and postoperative pain in acute clinical situations. As a rule, a simultaneous occurrence of several SNPs within the haplotype, causing low COMT activity, is more often associated with pain than any single SNP alone. In experimental pain studies, all negative findings resulted from concentrating solely on SNP rs4680 (Val158Met). Virtually all studies assessing haplotypes were able to confirm an association of a low COMT and increased pain. In chronic clinical pain, the effect of COMT polymorphisms depends on the pain conditions. Hence, in neuropathic and cancer pains, COMT activity is meaningless but in some chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions and migraine or headache low COMT activity appears to increase incidence and symptoms. A low COMT activity also increases availability of opioid receptors and may enhance opioid analgesia and adverse effects at least in cancer pains.
    International Review of Neurobiology 01/2010; 95:227-79. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Opioid analgesics are effective in relieving chronic pain, but they have serious adverse effects, including development of tolerance and dependence. Ibudilast, an inhibitor of glial activation and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, has shown potential in the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal. Because glial cell activation could also be involved in the development of opioid tolerance in rats, the authors studied the antinociceptive effects of ibudilast and morphine in different models of coadministration. Antinociception was assessed using male Sprague- Dawley rats in hot plate and tail-flick tests. The effects of ibudilast on acute morphine-induced antinociception, induction of morphine tolerance, and established morphine tolerance were studied. Systemic ibudilast produced modest dose-related antinociception and decreased locomotor activity at the studied doses of 2.5-22.5 mg/kg. The highest tested dose of 22.5 mg/kg produced 52% of the maximum possible effect in the tail-flick test. It had an additive antinociceptive effect when combined with systemic morphine. Coadministration of ibudilast with morphine did not attenuate the development of morphine tolerance. However, in morphine-tolerant rats, ibudilast partly restored morphine-induced antinociception. Ibudilast produces modest antinociception, and it is effective in restoring but not in preventing morphine tolerance. The mechanisms of the effects of ibudilast should be better understood before it is considered for clinical use.
    Anesthesiology 12/2009; 111(6):1356-64. · 5.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphisms modulate pain and opioid analgesia in human beings. It is not clear how the effects of COMT are mediated and only few relevant animal studies have been performed. Here, we used old male Comt gene knock-out mice as an animal model to study the effects of COMT deficiency on nociception that was assessed by the hot plate and tail flick tests. Stress-induced analgesia was achieved by forced swim. Morphine antinociception was measured after 10 mg/kg of morphine subcutaneously. Morphine tolerance was produced with subcutaneous morphine pellets and withdrawal provoked with subcutaneous naloxone. In the hot plate test, morphine-induced antinociception was significantly greater in the COMT knock-out mice, compared to the wild-type mice. This may be due to increased availability of opioid receptors as suggested by previous human studies. In the tail flick test, opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia was absent and morphine-induced analgesia was decreased in COMT knock-out mice. In the hot plate test, stress-induced analgesia developed to all mice regardless of the COMT genotype. There were no differences between the genotypes in the baseline nociceptive thresholds, morphine tolerance and withdrawal. Our findings show, for the first time, the importance of COMT activity in stress- and morphine-induced analgesia in mice. COMT activity seems to take part in the modulation of nociception not only in the brain, as suggested earlier, but also at the spinal/peripheral level.
    Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology 11/2008; 103(4):367-73. · 2.18 Impact Factor