Kailash C Bansal

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Dilli, NCT, India

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Publications (35)113.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We identified 82489 high-quality genome-wide SNPs from 93 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions through integrated reference genome-and de novo-based GBS assays. High intra-and inter-specific polymorphic potential (66–85%) and broader natural allelic diversity (6–64%) detected by genome-wide SNPs among accessions signify their efficacy for monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-regulating genomic (gene) regions/allelic variants from wild to cultivated Cicer gene pools for genetic improvement. The population-specific assignment of wild Cicer accessions pertaining to the primary gene pool are more influenced by geographical origin/phenotypic characteristics than species/gene-pools of origination. The functional significance of allelic variants (non-synonymous and regulatory SNPs) scanned from transcription factors and stress-responsive genes in differentiating wild accessions (with potential known sources of yield-contributing and stress tolerance traits) from cultivated desi and kabuli accessions, fine-mapping/map-based cloning of QTLs and determination of LD patterns across wild and cultivated gene-pools are suitably elucidated. The correlation between phenotypic (agromorphological traits) and molecular diversity-based admixed domestication patterns within six structured populations of wild and cultivated accessions via genome-wide SNPs was apparent. This suggests utility of whole genome SNPs as a potential resource for identifying naturally selected trait-regulating genomic targets/functional allelic variants adaptive to diverse agroclimatic regions for genetic enhancement of cultivated gene-pools. In chickpea, a plethora of array-based SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping approaches [including Illumina GoldenGate/Infinium (Bead Xpress array) and KBioscience Competitive Allele-Specific Polymerase chain reaction (KASPar) assays] are known to greatly expedite the large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping of previously discovered SNPs in diverse accessions, specifically for genetic diversity studies, phylogenetics and genetic linkage map construction 1–5. The implications of RAD-seq (restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing) that relies on barcoded multiplexing and the RE (restriction enzyme)-based NGS (next-generation sequencing) approach for simultaneous mining and genotyping of genome-wide SNPs are well illustrated in chickpea for comprehending the molecular diversity pattern among its diverse desi, kabuli and wild accessions 6. Recently, with the emergence
    Scientific Reports 12/2014; 5. DOI:10.1038/srep12468 · 5.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The identification and fine mapping of robust quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/genes governing important agro-morphological traits in chickpea still lacks systematic efforts at a genome-wide scale involving wild Cicer accessions. In this context, an 834 simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism marker-based high-density genetic linkage map between cultivated and wild parental accessions (Cicer arietinum desi cv.ICC4958andCicer reticulatumwild cv.ICC17160)was constructed. This inter-specific genetic map comprising eight linkage groups spanned a map length of 949.4 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 1.14 cM. Eleven novel major genomic regions harbouring 15 robust QTLs (15.6–39.8% R2 at 4.2–15.7 logarithm of odds) associated with four agro-morphological traits (100-seed weight, pod and branch number/plant and plant hairiness) were identified and mapped on chickpea chromosomes. Most of theseQTLsshowedpositiveadditivegeneeffects with effectivealleliccontribution fromICC4958,particularly for increasing seed weight (SW) and pod and branch number. One robust SW-influencing major QTL region (qSW4.2) has been narrowed down by combining QTL mapping with high-resolution QTL regionspecific association analysis, differential expression profiling and gene haplotype-based association/LD mapping. This enabled to delineate a strong SW-regulating ABI3VP1 transcription factor (TF) gene at traitspecific QTL interval and consequently identified favourable natural allelic variants and superior high seed weight-specific haplotypes in the upstream regulatory region of this gene showing increased transcript expression during seed development. The genes (TFs) harbouring diverse trait-regulating QTLs, once validated and fine-mapped by our developed rapid integrated genomic approach and through gene/QTL map-based cloning, can be utilized as potential candidates for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of chickpea.
    DNA Research 10/2014; 21(6). DOI:10.1093/dnares/dsu031 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Characterization of natural allelic diversity and understanding the genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) pattern in wild germplasm accessions by large-scale genotyping of informative microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers is requisite to facilitate chickpea genetic improvement. Large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping of genome-wide physically mapped 478 genic and genomic microsatellite markers and 380 transcription factor gene-derived SNP markers using gel-based assay, fluorescent dye-labelled automated fragment analyser and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass array have been performed. Outcome revealed their high genotyping success rate (97.5%) and existence of a high level of natural allelic diversity among 94 wild and cultivated Cicer accessions. High intra- and inter-specific polymorphic potential and wider molecular diversity (11–94%) along with a broader genetic base (13–78%) specifically in the functional genic regions of wild accessions was assayed by mapped markers. It suggested their utility in monitoring introgression and transferring target trait-specific genomic (gene) regions from wild to cultivated gene pool for the genetic enhancement. Distinct species/gene pool-wise differentiation, admixed domestication pattern, and differential genome-wide recombination and LD estimates/decay observed in a six structured population of wild and cultivated accessions using mapped markers further signifies their usefulness in chickpea genetics, genomics and breeding.
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e107484. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0107484 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic studies were undertaken in nine intersubspecific and interspecific crosses of lentil to understand the inheritance pattern of morphological characters viz., growth habit, flower colour, cotyledon colour and pod dehiscence. The F1 and F 2 generations of these wide crosses were assessed and suggested monogenic inheritance of these traits. The segregation pattern of these qualitative traits will also help in the identification of true to type F 1 plants from the interspecific crosses. All nine intersubspecific and interspecific crosses exhibited a wide variability for days to flowering, maturity and duration from flowering to maturity. The results indicated that these characters are governed by independent sets of genes during the growth and development phases. Heritability of both characters has been reported to be high in all wide crosses. In India, cultivated lentil species have an intrinsically narrow genetic base and that situation limits our plant breeder’s progre
    Journal of Genetics 08/2014; 93(2):561-6. DOI:10.1007/s12041-014-0409-5 · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 229 ReseaRch T he genus Cicer is a member of subfamily Papilionoideae and family Leguminosae, which comprises nine annual and 35 perennial species (van der Maesen, 1987). Of the 44 species, chick-pea (Cicer arietinum L.) is only the one cultivated on a large scale worldwide. Currently, it plays an important role in the agricul-tural production system and ranks third after dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and field pea (Pisum sativum L.) in terms of world grain legume crop production. It also improves soil fertility through biological nitrogen fixation and provides nitrogen for crops in the farming system. Despite extensive breeding efforts to improve chickpea, lack of stable crop production continues to be a prime concern. This situation is aggravated by the regular shifting of chickpea production to marginal lands, where it faces a multitude of major stresses (Singh et al., 1998). Further, a low level of genetic variability within the cultivated gene pool has hampered chick-pea breeders in their efforts to develop widely adapted cultivars ABSTRACT Systematic characterization and evaluation of the wild gene pool for breeding purposes is a common practice in an increasing number of cultivated crop species. Substantial yield improvement of culti-vated chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) has been lim-ited by the loss of useful genes for higher yield and lack of resistance to major biotic stresses. In the present study, a total of 88 wild accessions of six annual Cicer species viz., C. reticulatum Ladizinsky, C. echinospermum P.H. Davis, C. judaicum Boiss., C. pinnatifidum Jarb. & Spach, C. bijugum Rech. f., and C. yamashitae Kitam., along with three check varieties (controls) of cultivated chickpea namely, Pusa 256, Pusa 1103, and JG 11, were character-ized and evaluated for phenological and agro-morphological traits, including their reaction to the major fungal diseases [Ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass.) Labr. and Botrytis gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex. Fr.] and root knot nematode (Meliodogyne incognita). Wild Cicer accessions exhibited variation for some mor-phological traits, including plant pigmentation in C. reticulatum, C. judaicum, and C. pinnatifidum; number of leaflets leaf
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    ABSTRACT: 229 ReseaRch T he genus Cicer is a member of subfamily Papilionoideae and family Leguminosae, which comprises nine annual and 35 perennial species (van der Maesen, 1987). Of the 44 species, chick-pea (Cicer arietinum L.) is only the one cultivated on a large scale worldwide. Currently, it plays an important role in the agricul-tural production system and ranks third after dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and field pea (Pisum sativum L.) in terms of world grain legume crop production. It also improves soil fertility through biological nitrogen fixation and provides nitrogen for crops in the farming system. Despite extensive breeding efforts to improve chickpea, lack of stable crop production continues to be a prime concern. This situation is aggravated by the regular shifting of chickpea production to marginal lands, where it faces a multitude of major stresses (Singh et al., 1998). Further, a low level of genetic variability within the cultivated gene pool has hampered chick-pea breeders in their efforts to develop widely adapted cultivars ABSTRACT Systematic characterization and evaluation of the wild gene pool for breeding purposes is a common practice in an increasing number of cultivated crop species. Substantial yield improvement of culti-vated chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) has been lim-ited by the loss of useful genes for higher yield and lack of resistance to major biotic stresses. In the present study, a total of 88 wild accessions of six annual Cicer species viz., C. reticulatum Ladizinsky, C. echinospermum P.H. Davis, C. judaicum Boiss., C. pinnatifidum Jarb. & Spach, C. bijugum Rech. f., and C. yamashitae Kitam., along with three check varieties (controls) of cultivated chickpea namely, Pusa 256, Pusa 1103, and JG 11, were character-ized and evaluated for phenological and agro-morphological traits, including their reaction to the major fungal diseases [Ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass.) Labr. and Botrytis gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex. Fr.] and root knot nematode (Meliodogyne incognita). Wild Cicer accessions exhibited variation for some mor-phological traits, including plant pigmentation in C. reticulatum, C. judaicum, and C. pinnatifidum; number of leaflets leaf
    Crop Science 01/2014; 54(54):229-239. DOI:10.2135/cropsci2013.04.0225 · 1.48 Impact Factor
  • Kailash C Bansal · Ajay K Singh
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    ABSTRACT: Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important vegetable crop of tropical and temperate regions of the world. Here we describe a procedure for eggplant plastid transformation, which involves preparation of explants, biolistic delivery of plastid transformation vector into green stem segments, selection procedure, and identification of the transplastomic plants. Shoot buds appear from cut ends of the stem explants following 5-6 weeks of spectinomycin selection after bombardment with the plastid transformation vector containing aadA gene as selectable marker. Transplastomic lines are obtained after the regenerated shoots are subjected to several rounds of spectinomycin selection over a period of 9 weeks. Homoplasmic transplastomic lines are further confirmed by spectinomycin and streptomycin double selection. The transplastomic technology development in this plant species will open up exciting possibilities for improving crop performance, metabolic engineering, and the use of plants as factories for producing biopharmaceuticals.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 01/2014; 1132:305-16. DOI:10.1007/978-1-62703-995-6_19 · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Lakshmi Kasirajan · Boomiraj Kovilpillai · Kailash Chander Bansal
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed marker-free transgenic wheat using a transcription factor, AtDREB1A cloned from Arabidopsis. Southern hybridization confirmed a transgenic event with a single copy insertion. PCR analysis of the T1 plants showed four were positive only for AtDREB1A. A T1 plant (HRCB3#17-37) was marker-free and had good expression of drought tolerance in comparison with untransformed plants. The leaf relative water content of this T1 transgenic plant was 12-15 % higher than that of the wild type during stress with an 8 % higher yield under water deficit conditions compared with wild type plants.
    Biotechnology Letters 12/2013; 36(5). DOI:10.1007/s10529-013-1431-z · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    Kailash C Bansal · Sangram Keshari Lenka · Tapan K. Mondal
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract To meet the challenges of climate change, exploring natural diversity in the existing plant genetic resource pool as well as creation of new mutants through chemical mutagenesis and molecular biology is needed for developing climate-resilient elite genotypes. Ever-increasing area under existing abiotic stresses as well as emerging abiotic stress factors and their combinations have further added to the problems of the current crop improvement programmes. However, with the advancement in modern techniques such as next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to generate on a whole-genome scale, genomic resources for crop species at a much faster pace with considerably less efforts and money. The genomic resources thus generated will be useful for various plant breeding applications such as marker-assisted breeding for gene introgression, mapping QTLs or identifying new or rare alleles associated with a particular trait. In this article, we discuss various aspects of generation of genomic resources and their utilization for developing abiotic stress-tolerant crops to ensure sustainable agricultural production and food security in the backdrop of rapid climate change.
    Plant Breeding 12/2013; DOI:10.1111/pbr.12117 · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wild Lens taxa are invaluable sources of useful traits for broadening genetic base of cultivated lentil. Nine inter-sub-specific and interspecific crosses were made successfully between cultivated (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris) and wild lentils (L. culinaris ssp. orientalis, odemensis, lamottei and ervoides). The effect of species groups, day length and temperature on crossability in lentils was evident under normal winter sowing in New Delhi and in summer Himalayan nursery at Sangla in Himachal Pradesh, India, although pollen fertility assessed in all the cross-combinations showed no significant variation. True hybridity of nine inter-sub-specific and interspecific crosses was confirmed through morphological and molecular (ISSR) markers, in which three of 120 primers could confirm the hybridity of all the crosses. All cross-combinations were also studied for important quantitative traits related to yield. The range, mean and coefficient of variation were estimated in parental lines, F1 and F2 generations to determine the extent of variability generated in cultivated lentils through the introgression of genes from wild L. taxa. A high level of heterosis was observed in F1 crosses for important traits studied. Substantially higher variations for seed yield and its attributing traits were exhibited in F2 generations indicating transgressive segregation. The results of the present investigation revealed that wild L. taxa can be successfully exploited for lentil improvement programmes, and the variations generated could be easily utilized for broadening the genetic base of cultivated lentil gene pool for improving the yield as well as wider adaptation.
    Plant Breeding 12/2013; 132(6). DOI:10.1111/pbr.12089 · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fruit ripening process is associated with change in carotenoid profile and accumulation of lycopene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). In this study, we quantified the β-carotene and lycopene content at green, breaker and red-ripe stages of fruit ripening in eight tomato genotypes by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the genotypes, lycopene content was found highest in Pusa Rohini and lowest in VRT-32-1. To gain further insight into the regulation of lycopene biosynthesis and accumulation during fruit ripening, expression analysis of nine carotenoid pathway-related genes was carried out in the fruits of high lycopene genotype—Pusa Rohini. We found that expression of phytoene synthase and β-carotene hydroxylase-1 was four and thirty-fold higher, respectively, at breaker stage as compared to red-ripe stage of fruit ripening. Changes in the expression level of these genes were associated with a 40% increase in lycopene content at red-ripe stage as compared with breaker stage. Thus, the results from our study suggest the role of specific carotenoid pathway-related genes in accumulation of high lycopene during the fruit ripening processes.
    Journal of Genetics 10/2013; DOI:10.1007/s12041-013-0275-6 · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carotenoid metabolism is regulated by several genes encoding carotenoid biosynthetic pathway enzymes. In the present study, a fruit transcriptome in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was compared between high lycopene accumulating genotype EC-521086 and low lycopene accumulating genotype VRT-32-1 at three different stages (green, breaker and red) of fruit ripening. This analysis led to the identification of 2,558 differentially expressed genes at three stages of fruit ripening. Among these genes, 123 were carotenoid-correlated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed high expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in lycopene biosynthesis like IPP isomerase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, z-carotene desaturase; and comparatively lower expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in lycopene catabolism like lycopene cyclase, carotenoid e-ring hydroxylase, zeaxanthin epoxidase, violaxanthin de-epoxidase and neoxanthin synthase in EC-521086, thereby possibly explaining the high lycopene content in EC-521086 as compared with the low lycopene genotype VRT-32-1. Further, the EC-521086 genotype exhibited high expression of the TOMATO AGAMOUSLIKE 1 (TAGL1) MADS box gene—a positive regulator of lycopene accumulation—at breaker stage, and low expression of the ethylene receptor LeETR4 gene—a negative regulator of trans-lycopene and β-carotene accumulation, at the red stage of fruit ripening. Our results clearly demonstrate the role of specific genes in accumulation of high lycopene in the EC-521086 tomato genotype during the fruit ripening processes.
    Plant Molecular Biology Reporter 06/2013; 31:1384 – 1396. DOI:10.1007/s11105-013-0613-0 · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is the second most widely grown legume crop after soybean, accounting for a substantial proportion of human dietary nitrogen intake and playing a crucial role in food security in developing countries. We report the ∼738-Mb draft whole genome shotgun sequence of CDC Frontier, a kabuli chickpea variety, which contains an estimated 28,269 genes. Resequencing and analysis of 90 cultivated and wild genotypes from ten countries identifies targets of both breeding-associated genetic sweeps and breeding-associated balancing selection. Candidate genes for disease resistance and agronomic traits are highlighted, including traits that distinguish the two main market classes of cultivated chickpea-desi and kabuli. These data comprise a resource for chickpea improvement through molecular breeding and provide insights into both genome diversity and domestication.
    Nature Biotechnology 01/2013; 31(3). DOI:10.1038/nbt.2491 · 39.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identification of genes that are coexpressed across various tissues and environmental stresses is biologically interesting, since they may play coordinated role in similar biological processes. Genes with correlated expression patterns can be best identified by using coexpression network analysis of transcriptome data. In the present study, we analyzed the temporal-spatial coordination of gene expression in root, leaf and panicle of rice under drought stress and constructed network using WGCNA and Cytoscape. Total of 2199 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in at least three or more tissues, wherein 88 genes have coordinated expression profile among all the six tissues under drought stress. These 88 highly coordinated genes were further subjected to module identification in the coexpression network. Based on chief topological properties we identified 18 hub genes such as ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein, dehydrin, protein phosphatase 2C, LTPL153 - Protease inhibitor, phosphatidylethanolaminebinding protein, lactose permease-related, NADP-dependent malic enzyme, etc. Motif enrichment analysis showed the presence of ABRE cis-elements in the promoters of > 62% of the coordinately expressed genes. Our results suggest that drought stress mediated upregulated gene expression was coordinated through an ABA-dependent signaling pathway across tissues, at least for the subset of genes identified in this study, while down regulation appears to be regulated by tissue specific pathways in rice.
    Bioinformation 01/2013; 9(2):72-8. DOI:10.6026/97320630009072 · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The MYB gene family comprises one of the richest groups of transcription factors in plants. Plant MYB proteins are characterized by a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. MYB proteins are classified into four major groups namely, 1R-MYB, 2R-MYB, 3R-MYB and 4R-MYB based on the number and position of MYB repeats. MYB transcription factors are involved in plant development, secondary metabolism, hormone signal transduction, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. A comparative analysis of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis will help reveal the evolution and function of MYB genes in plants. Results A genome-wide analysis identified at least 155 and 197 MYB genes in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that MYB family genes possess relatively more number of introns in the middle as compared with C- and N-terminal regions of the predicted genes. Intronless MYB-genes are highly conserved both in rice and Arabidopsis. MYB genes encoding R2R3 repeat MYB proteins retained conserved gene structure with three exons and two introns, whereas genes encoding R1R2R3 repeat containing proteins consist of six exons and five introns. The splicing pattern is similar among R1R2R3 MYB genes in Arabidopsis. In contrast, variation in splicing pattern was observed among R1R2R3 MYB members of rice. Consensus motif analysis of 1kb upstream region (5′ to translation initiation codon) of MYB gene ORFs led to the identification of conserved and over-represented cis-motifs in both rice and Arabidopsis. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that several members of MYBs are up-regulated by various abiotic stresses both in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of chromosomal distribution, tandem repeats and phylogenetic relationship of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggested their evolution via duplication. Genome-wide comparative analysis of MYB genes and their expression analysis identified several MYBs with potential role in development and stress response of plants.
    BMC Genomics 10/2012; 13(1):544. DOI:10.1186/1471-2164-13-544 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Single-pass transmembrane protein (type II, III, and IV) possessing a membrane-spanning domain which targets the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. In both type II and III membrane proteins, a single membrane-spanning domain serves both as a signal to initiate insertion and as a membrane anchor. These signal anchor sequences may direct membrane insertion with either an N cyt /C exo or N exo /C cyt orientation. This study focused on type III proteins, which possess single-anchor sequence but not having N-terminal signal peptide by definition. Type III proteins have the cluster of positively charged residues on the C-terminal side of the signal anchor. The distribution of charged residues flanking the hydrophobic core of the signal sequences play important role in the orientation of signal anchor proteins in membrane. However, the mechanism by which a signal-anchor sequence adopts a particular orientation is still unknown. Here, we performed genome wide screening to identify number of signal anchor proteins in rice genome, which will help to understand the general mechanism of protein orientation in type III membrane proteins.
  • Kailash C. Bansal · Amit Katiyar · Shuchi Smita · Viswanathan Chinnusamy
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    ABSTRACT: Unraveling the molecular details of plant response and defense against abiotic stress factors such as drought, salt, and temperature extremes is a crucial and challenging issue in plant research. Functional genomics and computational biology have enhanced the pace of molecular dissection of abiotic stress response mechanisms. In the past two decades, significant progress has been made in identification of genes involved in abiotic stress responses in model plants Arabidopsis and rice through forward and reverse genetic analyses. Besides, QTL analysis is a powerful complementary technology with functional genomics to discover and isolate the genes of agronomic importance. Several QTL associated with abiotic stress responses of plants have been mapped. The availability of complete genome sequence of important model plants, namely, Arabidopsis and rice, QTL databases, and mapping tools facilitates genomics-based strategies for gene discovery, coupled with high-throughput techniques, for abiotic stress tolerance. Fine mapping of these QTL will help the identification of major genes and development of tightly linked molecular markers that can be employed to genetically improve crops through genetic engineering and marker-assisted selection (MAS) breeding.
    Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, 03/2012: pages 321-335; , ISBN: 9783527328406
  • Kailash C. Bansal · Amit Katiyar · Shuchi Smita · Viswanathan Chinnusamy
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    ABSTRACT: Unrevealing the molecular details of plant response and defense against abiotic stress factors such as drought, salt and temperature extremes is a crucial and challenging issue in plant research. Functional genomics and computational biology enhance pace of molecular dissection of abiotic stress response mechanisms. During the past two decades several QTLs associated with abiotic stress responses of plants have been mapped. A QTL is a chromosomal region that contains a gene or genes that influence a quantitative trait. QTL mapping approach is applied frequently to map chromosomal regions that contribute significantly to a complex trait. The availability of complete genome sequence of important model plants namely Arabidopsis and rice, QTL databases and mapping tools facilitate genomics-based strategies for gene discovery, coupled with high-throughput techniques speed-up gene discovery for abiotic stress tolerance.
    Improving Crop Resistance to Abiotic Stress, First 03/2012: chapter 14: pages 321-335; WILEY-BLACKWELL., ISBN: 978-3-527-63293-0
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    ABSTRACT: In post-genomic era, bioinformatic tools allow us to explore and reconstruct the precise gene interaction network. To deduce the function of uncharacterized gene, genetic network by co-regulatory analysis from an expression data is a foremost approach. In this study, we report comprehensive identification of co-expressed MYB gene modules in rice. MYB transcription factor family is involved in phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthesis and various other metabolic and developmental processes. By a reiterative database exploration, 249 potential OsMYB genes were retrieved. Computational analysis has shown the presence of several other functional domains including WD domain, G-beta repeat, response regulator receiver domain, BTB/POZ domain, SWIRM/Zinc finger domain and many more. Several studies have pointed out their involvement in a range of biological processes, revealing that a large number of MYB genes are transcriptionally regulated under conditions of biotic and/or abiotic stress. To investigate the existence of MYB co-regulatory network, a whole genome MYB expression study was carried out in rice. We identified the existence of co-expression clusters comprising phylogenetically related MYB genes, suggesting that specific sets of MYB genes might act in co-regulatory network. Thus, the co-expression networks identified in this study illustrate gene cooperation pathways that have not been identified by classical genetic.
    Int'l Conf. Bioinformatics and Computational Biology | BIOCOMP'11 |; 07/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Developing crops that are better adapted to abiotic stresses is important for food production in many parts of the world today. Anticipated changes in climate and its variability, particularly extreme temperatures and changes in rainfall, are expected to make crop improvement even more crucial for food production. Here, we review two key biotechnology approaches, molecular breeding and genetic engineering, and their integration with conventional breeding to develop crops that are more tolerant of abiotic stresses. In addition to a multidisciplinary approach, we also examine some constraints that need to be overcome to realize the full potential of agricultural biotechnology for sustainable crop production to meet the demands of a projected world population of nine billion in 2050.
    Trends in Plant Science 04/2011; 16(7):363-71. DOI:10.1016/j.tplants.2011.03.004 · 13.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

470 Citations
113.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources
      New Dilli, NCT, India
  • 2006–2011
    • National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
      Old Delhi, NCT, India
  • 2010
    • Indian Agricultural Research Institute
      • National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology (NRCPB)
      New Dilli, NCT, India