M. Sewilo

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (71)198.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of the infrared/submm emission of the LMC star forming complex N158-N159-N160. Combining observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70um), the Herschel Space Observatory (100-500um) and LABOCA (870um) allows us to work at the best angular resolution available now for an extragalactic source. We observe a remarkably good correlation between SPIRE and LABOCA emission and resolve the low surface brightnesses emission. We use the Spitzer and Herschel data to perform a resolved Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) modelling of the complex. Using MBB, we derive a global emissivity index beta_c of 1.47. If beta cold is fixed to 1.5, we find an average temperature of 27K. We also apply the Galliano et al. (2011) modelling technique (and amorphous carbon to model carbon dust) to derive maps of the star formation rate, the mean starlight intensity, the fraction of PAHs or the dust mass surface density of the region. We observe that the PAH fraction strongly decreases in the HII regions. This decrease coincides with peaks in the mean radiation field intensity map. The dust surface densities follow the FIR distribution, with a total dust mass of 2.1x10^4 Msolar (2.8 times less than when using graphite grains) in the resolved elements we model. We find a non-negligible amount of dust in the molecular cloud N159 South (showing no massive SF). We also investigate the drivers of the Herschel/PACS and SPIRE submm colours as well as the variations in the gas-to-dust mass ratio (G/D) and the XCO conversion factor in the region N159. We finally model individual regions to analyse variations in the SED shape across the complex and the 870um emission in more details. No measurable submm excess emission at 870um seems to be detected in these regions.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 02/2013; 431(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present new observations of 34 YSO candidates in the SMC. The anchor of the analysis is a set of Spitzer-IRS spectra, supplemented by groundbased 3-5 micron spectra, Spitzer and NIR photometry, optical spectroscopy and radio data. The sources' SEDs and spectral indices are consistent with embedded YSOs; prominent silicate absorption is observed in the spectra of at least ten sources, silicate emission is observed towards four sources. PAH emission is detected towards all but two sources. Based on band ratios (in particular the strength of the 11.3 micron and the weakness of the 8.6 micron bands) PAH emission towards SMC YSOs is dominated by predominantly small neutral grains. Ice absorption is observed towards fourteen sources in the SMC. The comparison of H2O and CO2 ice column densities for SMC, LMC and Galactic samples suggests that there is a significant H2O column density threshold for the detection of CO2 ice. This supports the scenario proposed by Oliveira et al. (2011), where the reduced shielding in metal-poor environments depletes the H2O column density in the outer regions of the YSO envelopes. No CO ice is detected towards the SMC sources. Emission due to pure-rotational 0-0 transitions of H2 is detected towards the majority of SMC sources, allowing us to estimate rotational temperatures and column densities. All but one source are spectroscopically confirmed as SMC YSOs. Of the 33 YSOs identified in the SMC, 30 sources populate different stages of massive stellar evolution. The remaining three sources are classified as intermediate-mass YSOs with a thick dusty disc and a tenuous envelope still present. We propose one of the sources is a D-type symbiotic system, based on the presence of Raman, H and He emission lines in the optical spectrum, and silicate emission in the IRS-spectrum. This would be the first dust-rich symbiotic system identified in the SMC. (abridged)
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2012; 428(4). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    The Astronomical Journal 05/2012; 143:127. · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a new set of selection criteria for the identification of infrared bright young stellar object (YSO) candidates and apply them to nine HII regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), focusing particularly on lower mass candidates missed by most surveys. Data are from the Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program SAGE (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution; Meixner et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/132/2268, see also II/305), combined with optical photometry from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky et al. 1997AJ....114.1002Z) and near-infrared photometry from the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF; Kato et al. 2007, Cat. II/288). We choose regions of diverse physical size, star formation rates (SFRs), and ages. We also cover a wide range of locations and surrounding environments in the LMC. These active star-forming regions are LHA 120-N 11, N 44, N 51, N 105, N 113, N 120, N 144, N 160, and N 206. Some have been well-studied (e.g., N11, N44, N160) in the past, while others (e.g., N51, N144) have received little attention. We identify 1045 YSO candidates, including 918 never before identified and 127 matching previous candidate lists. We characterize the evolutionary stage and physical properties of each candidate using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter of Robitaille et al. (2007ApJS..169..328R) and estimate mass functions and SFRs for each region. (4 data files).
    VizieR Online Data Catalog. 04/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Most star formation in the universe occurs at low metallicity. Yet most star formation studies focus on nearby, high metallicity Galactic regions for which young stellar objects (YSOs) can be resolved and studied in detail. The nearby Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) offer a fantastic opportunity to investigate, on both large (galactic; kpc) and small (individual YSO; sub-parsec) scales, if and how the process of star formation changes with metallicity. The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on JWST will be a powerful probe of this and other extragalactic star formation. In this poster, we present example programs that utilize the spectroscopic and photometric imaging capabilities of MIRI to investigate star formation in the Magellanic Clouds. These example programs build upon recently discovered YSOs in the LMC and SMC with the Spitzer-SAGE and Herschel-HERITAGE surveys. This work is support by NASA NAG5-12595.
    01/2012;
  • Why Galaxies Care about AGB Stars II: Shining Examples and Common Inhabitants; 09/2011
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    ABSTRACT: We present the classification of 197 point sources observed with the Infrared Spectrograph in the SAGE-Spec Legacy programme on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We introduce a decision-tree method of object classification based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information, which is used to classify the SAGE-Spec sample of point sources. The decision tree has a broad application to mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys, where supporting photometry and variability information are available. We use these classifications to make deductions about the stellar populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the success of photometric classification methods. We find 90 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 29 young stellar objects, 23 post-AGB objects, 19 red supergiants, eight stellar photospheres, seven background galaxies, seven planetary nebulae, two HII regions and 12 other objects, seven of which remain unclassified. (1 data file).
    VizieR Online Data Catalog. 09/2011; 741:11597.
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    ABSTRACT: The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides a unique laboratory for the study of the lifecycle of dust given its low metallicity (~1/5 solar) and relative proximity (~60 kpc). This motivated the SAGE-SMC (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud) Spitzer Legacy program with the specific goals of studying the amount and type of dust in the present interstellar medium, the sources of dust in the winds of evolved stars, and how much dust is consumed in star formation. This program mapped the full SMC (30 sq. deg.) including the Body, Wing, and Tail in 7 bands from 3.6 to 160 micron using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The data were reduced, mosaicked, and the point sources measured using customized routines specific for large surveys. We have made the resulting mosaics and point source catalogs available to the community. The infrared colors of the SMC are compared to those of other nearby galaxies and the 8 micron/24 micron ratio is somewhat lower and the 70 micron/160 micron ratio is somewhat higher than the average. The global infrared spectral energy distribution shows that the SMC has ~3X lower aromatic emission/PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) abundances compared to most nearby galaxies. Infrared color-magnitude diagrams are given illustrating the distribution of different asymptotic giant branch stars and the locations of young stellar objects. Finally, the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of HII/star formation regions is compared to the equivalent Large Magellanic Cloud average HII/star formation region SED. These preliminary results are expanded in detail in companion papers.
    The Astronomical Journal 07/2011; 142(4). · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the infrared (IR) properties of cool, evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), including the red giant branch (RGB) stars and the dust-producing red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program entitled: "Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-stripped, Low Metallicity SMC", or SAGE-SMC. The survey includes, for the first time, full spatial coverage of the SMC bar, wing, and tail regions at infrared (IR) wavelengths (3.6 - 160 microns). We identify evolved stars using a combination of near-IR and mid-IR photometry and point out a new feature in the mid-IR color-magnitude diagram that may be due to particularly dusty O-rich AGB stars. We find that the RSG and AGB stars each contribute ~20% of the global SMC flux (extended + point-source) at 3.6 microns, which emphasizes the importance of both stellar types to the integrated flux of distant metal-poor galaxies. The equivalent SAGE survey of the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC) allows us to explore the influence of metallicity on dust production. We find that the SMC RSG stars are less likely to produce a large amount of dust (as indicated by the [3.6]-[8] color). There is a higher fraction of carbon-rich stars in the SMC, and these stars appear to able to reach colors as red as their LMC counterparts, indicating that C-rich dust forms efficiently in both galaxies. A preliminary estimate of the dust production in AGB and RSG stars reveals that the extreme C-rich AGB stars dominate the dust input in both galaxies, and that the O-rich stars may play a larger role in the LMC than in the SMC.
    The Astronomical Journal 06/2011; 142(4). · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report multi-frequency Very Large Array observations of three massive star formation regions (MSFRs) containing radio continuum components that were identified as broad radio recombination line (RRL) sources and hypercompact (HC) H II region candidates in our previous H92alpha and H76alpha study: G10.96+0.01 (component W), G28.20-0.04 (N), and G34.26+0.15 (B). An additional HC H II region candidate, G45.07+0.13, known to have broad H66alpha and H76alpha lines, small size, high electron density and emission measure, was also included. We observed with high spatial resolution (0.9" to 2.3") the H53alpha, H66alpha, H76alpha, and H92alpha RRLs and the radio continuum at the corresponding wavelengths (0.7 to 3.6 cm). The motivation for these observations was to obtain RRLs over a range of principal quantum states to look for signatures of pressure broadening and macroscopic velocity structure. We find that pressure broadening contributes significantly to the line widths, but it is not the sole cause of the broad lines. We compare radio continuum and dust emission distributions and find a good correspondence. We also discuss maser emission and multi-wavelength observations reported in the literature for these MSFRs.
    05/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We propose to re-observe and enhance the original GLIMPSE survey region by following the Galactic warp at a Galactocentric distance of 13 kpc to survey the far outer Galaxy. The new survey will cover longitudes of 15 < l l > -95, with a latitude width of 2.5 degrees; 55% of the survey will overlap with GLIMPSE, and 45% will cover new territory. The survey strategy of 3 HDR visits on each sky position will increase the dynamic range over GLIMPSE by a factor of 13 on the faint end and 3 on the bright end. The survey will be enhanced by several complementary surveys at near-IR, mid-IR, far-IR, submm, and radio wavelengths. Deep GLIMPSE will allow us to map stellar Galactic structure out to the edge of the stellar disk; map star formation and H II regions in the far outer Galaxy; improve our estimate of the star formation rate (SFR) of the Galaxy and study the SFR as a function of Galactocentric distance; study low-mass as well as high-mass star formation in the Galactic plane and determine stellar mass functions and evolutionary timescales of YSOs as a function of stellar mass and environment; continue to catalog PAH bubbles, IRDCs, YSO outflows, stellar clusters, external galaxies, brown dwarfs, and more; and search for dwarf galaxies hidden by the Galactic midplane.
    Spitzer Proposal. 05/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The photometric data used in the SEDs come from a variety of different sources covering different fields of view. These data are summarized in Figure 1 and Table 1. (2 data files).
    VizieR Online Data Catalog. 05/2011; 219:30023.
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    ABSTRACT: Fundamental parameters and time evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as d = 4611{sup +213}{sub -200} pc and age as 12 {+-} 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more red giant branch mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more metal-poor {omega} Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of {approx}1000 L{sub sun}, becoming ubiquitous above L = 2000 L{sub sun}. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 04/2011; 193:23. · 16.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the photometric catalogs for the star-forming cluster NGC 602 in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud covering a range of wavelengths from optical (HST/ACS F555W, F814W, and SMARTS/ANDICAM V, I) to infrared (Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 {mu}m and MIPS 24 {mu}m). Combining this with Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared photometry (J, H, K{sub s} ), we compare the young main sequence (MS) and pre-main sequence (PMS) populations prominent in the optical with the current young stellar object (YSO) populations revealed by the infrared. We analyze the MS and PMS population with isochrones in color-magnitude diagrams to derive ages and masses. The optical data reveal {approx}565 PMS candidates, low-mass Stage III YSOs. We characterize {approx}40 YSOs by fitting their spectral energy distributions to a grid of models (Robitaille et al.) to derive luminosities, masses, and evolutionary phase (Stages I-III). The higher resolution HST images reveal that {approx}70% of the YSO candidates are either multiples or protoclusters. For YSOs and PMS sources found in common, we find a consistency in the masses derived. We use the YSO mass function to derive a present-day star formation rate of {approx}0.2-1.0 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, similar to the rate derived from the optical star formation history suggesting a constant star formation rate for this region. We demonstrate a progression of star formation from the optical star cluster center to the edge of the star-forming dust cloud. We derive lifetimes of a few 10{sup 5} years for the YSO Stages I and II.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2011; 730(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fundamental parameters and time-evolution of mass loss are investigated for post-main-sequence stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). This is accomplished by fitting spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to existing optical and infrared photometry and spectroscopy, to produce a true Hertzsprung--Russell diagram. We confirm the cluster's distance as 4611 (+213, -200) pc and age as 12 +/- 1 Gyr. Horizontal branch models appear to confirm that no more RGB mass loss occurs in 47 Tuc than in the more-metal-poor omega Centauri, though difficulties arise due to inconsistencies between the models. Using our SEDs, we identify those stars which exhibit infrared excess, finding excess only among the brightest giants: dusty mass loss begins at a luminosity of ~ 1000 Lsun, becoming ubiquitous above 2000 Lsun. Recent claims of dust production around lower-luminosity giants cannot be reproduced, despite using the same archival Spitzer imagery.
    01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the photometric catalogs for the star-forming cluster NGC 602 in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud covering a range of wavelengths from optical HST/ACS (F555W, F814W) and SMARTS/ANDICAM (V, I) to infrared (Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 micron and MIPS 24 micron). Combining this with IRSF (InfraRed Survey Facility) near-infrared photometry (J, H, Ks), we compare the young main sequence (MS) and pre-main sequence (PMS) populations prominent in the optical with the current young stellar object (YSO) populations revealed by the infrared (IR). We analyze the MS and PMS population with isochrones in color-magnitude diagrams to derive ages and masses. The optical data reveal ~565 PMS candidates, low mass Stage III YSOs. We characterize ~40 YSOs by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a grid of models (Robitaille et al. 2007) to derive luminosities, masses and evolutionary phase (Stage I-III). The higher resolution HST images reveal that ~70% of the YSO candidates are either multiples or protoclusters. For YSOs and PMS sources found in common, we find a consistency in the masses derived. We use the YSO mass function to derive a present-day star-formation rate of ~0.2-1.0 Msun/yr/kpc^2, similar to the rate derived from the optical star formation history suggesting a constant star formation rate for this region. We demonstrate a progression of star formation from the optical star cluster center to the edge of the star forming dust cloud. We derive lifetimes of a few 10^5 years for the YSO Stages I and II. Comment: 55 pages, 18 Figures; High resolution images available form author Accepted to ApJ
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2010; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spitzer SAGE-Spec program (PID: 40159) consists of 224.6hr of spectroscopic observations of targets in the LMC. The targets included point sources and extended regions, both of which were observed using the IRS low-resolution and MIPS SED modes. Observations were done in the IRS staring mode for 196 point sources, and 48 point sources were observed in MIPS SED mode. In addition, 10 extended regions were mapped in both the MIPS SED and IRS observing modes. (4 data files).
    VizieR Online Data Catalog. 11/2010; 612:20683.
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of the infrared properties of 4922 spectroscopically confirmed massive stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, focusing on the active OB star population. Besides OB stars, our sample includes yellow and red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and supergiant B[e] stars. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We also find photometric variability among the active OB population and evidence for transitions of Be stars to B stars and vice versa. We furthermore confirm the presence of dust around all the supergiant B[e] stars in our sample, finding the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to be very similar, in contrast to the variety of SED shapes among the spectrally variable LBVs. Comment: 5 pages, 1 figure, to appear in the proceedings of the IAUS 272 on "Active OB stars: structure, evolution, mass loss and critical limits" (Paris, July 19-23, 2010), Cambridge University Press. Editors C. Neiner, G. Wade, G. Meynet and G. Peters
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union 10/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We present results of our study of the infrared properties of massive stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, which are based on the Spitzer SAGE surveys of these galaxies. We have compiled catalogs of spectroscopically confirmed massive stars in each galaxy, as well as photometric catalogs for a subset of these stars that have infrared counterparts in the SAGE database, with uniform photometry from 0.3 to 24 microns in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. These catalogs enable a comparative study of infrared excesses of OB stars, classical Be stars, yellow and red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars, Luminous Blue Variables and supergiant B[e] stars, as a function of metallicity, and provide the first roadmaps for interpreting luminous, massive, resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies at infrared wavelengths. Comment: 5 pages, 1 figure, contribution to 39th Liege Astrophysical Colloquium, 'The multi-wavelength view of hot, massive stars'
    10/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We present analysis of the energetic star-forming region Henize 206 (N206) located near the southern edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on photometric data from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE-LMC; IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 μm and MIPS 24 μm), Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared survey (J, H, K s ), and the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS UBVI) covering a wavelength range of 0.36-24 μm. Young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified based upon their location in infrared color-magnitude space and classified by the shapes of their spectral energy distributions in comparison with a pre-computed grid of YSO models. We identify 116 YSO candidates: 102 are well characterized by the YSO models, predominately Stage I, and 14 may be multiple sources or young sources with transition disks. Careful examination of the individual sources and their surrounding environment allows us to identify a factor of ~14.5 more YSO candidates than have already been identified. The total mass of these well-fit YSO candidates is ~520 M ☉. We calculate a current star formation rate of 0.27 × 10–1 M ☉ yr–1 kpc–2. The distribution of YSO candidates appears to follow shells of neutral material in the interstellar medium.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2010; 721:357-368. · 6.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

104 Citations
198.86 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2012
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2007–2010
    • Space Telescope Science Institute
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2003–2008
    • University of Wisconsin, Madison
      • Department of Astronomy
      Madison, MS, United States
  • 2005
    • Max Planck Institute for Astronomy
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany