Anjali Kakria

Father Muller Medical College, Mangalur, Karnātaka, India

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Publications (4)3.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: To estimate the numbers and trends in cervix cancer cases visiting the Radiotherapy Department at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, statistical modelling from retrospective data was applied. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on data for a total of 159 patients treated for cervix cancer at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, between 28th September 2000 and 31st December 2008. Theoretical statistics were used for statistical modelling and forecasting. Results: Using curve fitting method, Linear, Logarithmic, Inverse, Quadratic, Cubic, Compound, Power and Exponential growth models were validated. Including the constant term, none of the models fit the data well. Excluding the constant term, the cubic model demonstrated the best fit, with R2=0.871 (p=0.004). In 2008, the observed and estimated numbers of cases were same (12). According to our model, 273 patients with cervical cancer are expected to visit the hospital in 2015. Conclusions: Our data predict a significant increase in cervical cancer cases in this region in the near future. This observation suggests the need for more focus and resource allocation on cervical cancer screening and treatment.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2013; 14(3):2097-100. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regional cancer epidemiology is an important basis for determining the priorities for cancer control in different countries worldwide. There is no reliable information about the pattern of head and neck cancer in western Nepal and hence an attempt was here made to evaluate the situation based on hospital data, which provide the only source in the western region of Nepal. A clinicopathological analysis of head and neck cancers treated between 2003 and 2006 in Manipal Teaching Hospital affiliated to Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Western Development Region, Nepal was performed. A total of 105 head and neck cancer cases were identified with a male to female ratio of 1.8:1. The median ages of male and female patients were 62 and 64 years, respectively. Ninety-seven (92.4%) of the cancer patients were suffering from carcinoma, three (2.9%) had blastoma, three (2.9%) had sarcoma, and two (1.9%) had lymphoma. The majority (61.9%) of carcinoma cases were squamous cell carcinoma followed by anaplastic carcinoma (7.2%). Of the carcinoma cases, the most common site of primary lesion was larynx (19.6%), followed by the thyroid (14.4%), the tongue and hypopharynx with 10.3% cases each. Comparative analysis among males and females did not reveal any sex difference in type of head and neck cancers. The head and neck cancer pattern revealed by the present study provides valuable leads to cancer epidemiology in western Nepal and useful information for health planning and cancer control, and future research in western Nepal.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2012; 13(12):6059-62. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    Gastrointestinal cancer research: GCR 10/2008; 2(5):260-1.
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    ABSTRACT: Information on cancer patterns is an important basis for determining the priorities for cancer control in different countries worldwide. There is no reliable information about the incidence or pattern of cancer in Nepal and hence an attempt was made to assess the situation based on hospital data which is the only source in the western region of Nepal. Cancer cases diagnosed by all methods or treated in Manipal Teaching Hospital, affiliated to Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, during 1st January 2003 to 30th May 2005 were used for the present study. A total of 957 cancer cases were identified with a male to female ratio of 1.1:1. The median age of male and female patients was 63 and 60 years, respectively. The proportion of microscopically confirmed cases, both from primary and metastatic sites was 87.5% and tobacco-related cancers constituted 48% of all cancers among males and 28% among females. For males the leading cancer sites were lung (22.2%), larynx (9.8%) and stomach (9%) and that for females was lung (20%), cervix (19.7%) and breast (7.8%). Among males, 33.1% of all cancers were in the respiratory system followed by digestive organ cancers (23.2%). Among females, 28.4% cancers were related to the reproductive system, 22.8% to the respiratory system and 14.1% to digestive organs. The cancer pattern revealed by the present study provides valuable leads to cancer epidemiology in Nepal, particularly in the western region, and provides useful information for health planning and future research.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 8(2):183-6. · 1.27 Impact Factor