Jeffrey Chou

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States

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Publications (7)35.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 23 January 2014; doi:10.1038/gt.2013.87.
    Gene therapy 01/2014; · 4.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Application of high-throughput DNA sequencing to the analysis of B- and T-lymphocyte antigen receptors has great potential for improving the monitoring of lymphoid malignancies, assessing immune reconstitution after hematopoietic cell transplantation, and characterizing the composition of lymphocyte repertoires. Current technology can define the number and frequency of IGH, TCRα, TCRβ, or TCRγ chains expressed in a population of lymphocytes; techniques for determining the number of antigen receptor heterodimers, such as TCRαβ pairs, expressed in the population are under development.
    Blood 05/2013; · 9.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Xenografts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) in immune-deficient mice have great potential for accelerating the study of tumor biology and therapy. We evaluated xenografts established in NOD/scid/IL2Rγ-null mice from the primary or metastatic tumors of 27 patients with CRC to estimate their capacity for expanding tumor cells for in vitro studies and to assess how faithfully they recapitulated the transcriptional profile of their parental tumors. RNA-seq analysis of parental human CRC tumors and their derivative xenografts demonstrated that reproducible transcriptional changes characterize the human tumor to murine xenograft transition. In most but not all cases, the human stroma, vasculature, and hematopoietic elements were systematically replaced by murine analogues while the carcinoma component persisted. Once established as xenografts, human CRC cells that could be propagated by serial transplantation remained transcriptionally stable. Three histologically atypical xenografts, established from patients with peritoneal metastases, contained abundant human stromal elements and blood vessels in addition to human tumor cells. The transcriptomes of these mixed tumor/stromal xenografts did not closely resemble those of their parental tumors, and attempts to propagate such xenografts by serial transplantation were unsuccessful. Stable expression of numerous genes previously identified as high priority targets for immunotherapy was observed in most xenograft lineages. Aberrant expression in CRC cells of human genes that are normally only expressed in hematopoietic cells was also observed. Our results suggest that human CRC cells expanded in murine xenografts have great utility for studies of tumor immunobiology and targeted therapies such as immunotherapy but also identify potential limitations.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e79874. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the antitumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8 T cells from HLA-A2 healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8/TET T-cell clones specific for 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors, respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417-25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4-infected HLA-A2 EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2-expressing and 5T4-expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the coinoculation of a representative 5T417-25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune-deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high-avidity CD8 CTL able to recognize the naturally processed 5T417-25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8T-cell immunity targeting 5T417-25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies.
    Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md.: 1997) 08/2012; 35(7):523-33. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Development of specific immunotherapy for colorectal cancer (CRC) will require identification of antigens selectively or exclusively expressed on CRC cells and strategies to induce and enhance immune responses against these antigenic targets. Cancer-testis (C-T) antigens are proving to be excellent targets for immunotherapy of solid tumors such as melanoma, but their clinical utility for treatment of CRC has to date been limited by their infrequent expression in CRC cells. Here we report that the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) induces expression of NY-ESO-1 and other C-T genes in CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo in a dose-dependent manner but has negligible effects on the expression of C-T genes in normal nontransformed cells such as fibroblasts. The induction by DAC of NY-ESO-1 expression in CRC cells persists over 100 days after DAC exposure and is associated with increased levels of NY-ESO-1 protein. CRC cells exposed to DAC at concentrations that can be readily achieved in vivo are rendered susceptible to major histocompatibility complex-restricted recognition by CD8 NY-ESO-1-specific T cells. We also demonstrate that retroviral transduction of polyclonal peripheral blood T cells from a metastatic CRC patient with the T-cell receptor α-chain and β-chain genes encoding a human leukocyte antigen-A2-restricted, NY-ESO-1157-165-specific T-cell receptor can be used to generate both CD8 and CD4 NY-ESO-1157-165-specific T cells that selectively recognize DAC-treated CRC but not nontransformed cells. Collectively, these results suggest that the combination of epigenetic modulation and adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T lymphocytes may enable specific immunotherapy for CRC.
    Journal of immunotherapy (Hagerstown, Md.: 1997) 02/2012; 35(2):131-41. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chondrosarcoma has no proven systemic option in the metastatic setting. The development of a non-cross-resistant strategy, such as cellular immunotherapy using antigen-specific T cells would be highly desirable. NY-ESO-1 and PRAME are members of the Cancer Testis Antigen (CTA) family that have been identified as promising targets for T cell therapy. LAGE-1 is a cancer testis antigen 90% homologous to NY-ESO-1, sharing the 157-165 A*0201 NY-ESO-1 epitope with its transcript variant, LAGE-1s. A number of CTA's have been induced using 5-Aza-2-Deoxycitabine (5-Aza-dC) in other cancers. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of targeting chondrosarcoma tumors using NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1s and PRAME specific T cells using 5-Aza-dC to induce antigen expression. We used 11 flash frozen tumors from the University of Washington tumor bank to test for the expression of NY-ESO-1, PRAME, LAGE-1s and LAGE-1L in chondrosarcoma tumors. Using four chondrosarcoma cell lines we tested the expression of these CTA's with and without 5-Aza-dC treatments. Finally, using NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1s and PRAME specific effectors that we generated from sarcoma patients, we evaluated the ability of these T cells to lyse A*0201 expressing chondrosarcoma cell lines in vitro both with and without 5-Aza-dC treatment. A minority (36%) of chondrosarcoma tumors expressed either NY-ESO-1 or LAGE-1s at >10% of our reference value and none expressed PRAME at that level. However, in all four of the chondrosarcoma cell lines tested, NY-ESO-1 and PRAME expression could be induced following treatment with 5-Aza-dC including in cell lines where expression was absent or barely detectable. Furthermore, NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1s and PRAME specific CD8+ effector T cells were able to specifically recognize and lyse A*0201 expressing chondrosarcoma cell lines following 5-Aza-dC treatment. These data suggest that adoptive immunotherapy in combination with 5-Aza-dC may be a potential strategy to treat unresectable or metastatic chondrosarcoma patients where no proven systemic therapies exist.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(2):e32165. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor regression has been observed in some patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Cellular and molecular characterization of antigens recognized by tumor-reactive T cells isolated from responding patients could potentially provide insight into the mechanisms of tumor regression. CD8+ CTL clones that recognized a novel RCC-associated minor histocompatibility (H) antigen presented by HLA-A*0201 were isolated from two patients with metastatic RCC who experienced tumor regression or stable disease following nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT. These clones were used to screen a cDNA library and isolate the unique cDNA encoding the antigen. An alternative open reading frame in the C19orf48 gene located on chromosome 19q13 encodes the HLA-A*0201-restricted minor H antigen recognized by the RCC-reactive T cells. The differential T-cell recognition of donor- and recipient-derived target cells is attributable to a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism within the nucleotide interval that encodes the antigenic peptide. Assays for gene expression and CTL recognition showed that the C19orf48-encoded peptide is widely expressed in renal tumors and solid tumors of other histologies. The antigenic peptide can be processed for CTL recognition via both TAP-dependent and TAP-independent pathways. Donor T-cell responses against the HLA-A*0201-restricted minor H antigen encoded by C19orf48 may contribute to RCC regression after MHC-matched allogeneic HCT.
    Clinical Cancer Research 09/2008; 14(16):5260-9. · 7.84 Impact Factor