Carla L Hudson Kam

University of British Columbia - Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

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Publications (13)28.68 Total impact

  • Amy S Finn, Taraz Lee, Allison Kraus, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: Compared to children, adults are bad at learning language. This is counterintuitive; adults outperform children on most measures of cognition, especially those that involve effort (which continue to mature into early adulthood). The present study asks whether these mature effortful abilities interfere with language learning in adults and further, whether interference occurs equally for aspects of language that adults are good (word-segmentation) versus bad (grammar) at learning. Learners were exposed to an artificial language comprised of statistically defined words that belong to phonologically defined categories (grammar). Exposure occurred under passive or effortful conditions. Passive learners were told to listen while effortful learners were instructed to try to 1) learn the words, 2) learn the categories, or 3) learn the category-order. Effortful learners showed an advantage for learning words while passive learners showed an advantage for learning the categories. Effort can therefore hurt the learning of categories.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(7):e101806. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Does tuning to one's native language explain the "sensitive period" for language learning? We explore the idea that tuning to (or becoming more selective for) the properties of one's native-language could result in being less open (or plastic) for tuning to the properties of a new language. To explore how this might lead to the sensitive period for grammar learning, we ask if tuning to an earlier-learned aspect of language (sound structure) has an impact on the neural representation of a later-learned aspect (grammar). English-speaking adults learned one of two miniature artificial languages (MALs) over 4 days in the lab. Compared to English, both languages had novel grammar, but only one was comprised of novel sounds. After learning a language, participants were scanned while judging the grammaticality of sentences. Judgments were performed for the newly learned language and English. Learners of the similar-sounds language recruited regions that overlapped more with English. Learners of the distinct-sounds language, however, recruited the Superior Temporal Gyrus (STG) to a greater extent, which was coactive with the Inferior Frontal Gyrus (IFG). Across learners, recruitment of IFG (but not STG) predicted both learning success in tests conducted prior to the scan and grammatical judgment ability during the scan. Data suggest that adults' difficulty learning language, especially grammar, could be due, at least in part, to the neural commitments they have made to the lower level linguistic components of their native language.
    Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 01/2013; 7:85.
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    Marc Ettlinger, Amy S Finn, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: It has been well documented how language-specific cues may be used for word segmentation. Here, we investigate what role a language-independent phonological universal, the sonority sequencing principle (SSP), may also play. Participants were presented with an unsegmented speech stream with non-English word onsets that juxtaposed adherence to the SSP with transitional probabilities. Participants favored using the SSP in assessing word-hood, suggesting that the SSP represents a potentially powerful cue for word segmentation. To ensure the SSP influenced the segmentation process (i.e., during learning), we presented two additional groups of participants with either (a) no exposure to the stimuli prior to testing or (b) the same stimuli with pauses marking word breaks. The SSP did not influence test performance in either case, suggesting that the SSP is important for word segmentation during the learning process itself. Moreover, the fact that SSP-independent segmentation of the stimulus occurred (in the latter control condition) suggests that universals are best understood as biases rather than immutable constraints on learning.
    Cognitive Science A Multidisciplinary Journal 11/2011; 36(4):655-73. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    Carla L Hudson Kam, Whitney Goodrich Smith
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the problem of the conventionalization of grammatical morphology during language formation, asking how a form comes to have a shared grammatical meaning in an emerging linguistic community. Results from an experiment, inspired by changes in the use of space in Nicaraguan Sign Language, are presented that demonstrate the difficulty of conventionalization for grammatical forms. We show that even in cases where meaning should be relatively easy to discern, adult listeners are not consistent, either internally or when compared to each other, in the inferences they draw. The paper ends with a discussion of the nature of the problem with respect to emerging languages more broadly, and speculates on how grammatical forms might come to have shared meanings in a newly emerging language, focussing on the role that children might play in the process.
    The Canadian Journal of Linguistics / La revue canadienne de linguistique 03/2011; 56(1):109-124.
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    ABSTRACT: Although children perform more poorly than adults on many cognitive measures, they are better able to learn things such as language and music. These differences could result from the delayed specialization of neural circuits and asynchronies in the maturation of neural substrates required for learning. Working memory--the ability to hold information in mind that is no longer present in the environment--comprises a set of cognitive processes required for many, if not all, forms of learning. A critical neural substrate for working memory (the prefrontal cortex) continues to mature through early adulthood. What are the functional consequences of this late maturation for working memory? Using a longitudinal design, we show that although individuals recruit prefrontal cortex as expected during both early and late adolescence during a working memory task, this recruitment is correlated with behavior only in late adolescence. The hippocampus is also recruited, but only during early, and not late, adolescence. Moreover, the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are coactive in early adolescence regardless of task demands or performance, in contrast to the pattern seen in late adolescents and adults, when these regions are coactive only under high task demands. Together, these data demonstrate that neural circuitry underlying working memory changes during adolescent development. The diminishing contribution of the hippocampus in working memory function with age is an important observation that informs questions about how children and adults learn differently.
    Journal of Neuroscience 08/2010; 30(33):11062-7. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    Psyche Loui, David L Wessel, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of musical rules and structures has been reliably demonstrated in humans of different ages, cultures, and levels of music training, and has been linked to our musical preferences. However, how humans acquire knowledge of and develop preferences for music remains unknown. The present study shows that humans rapidly develop knowledge and preferences when given limited exposure to a new musical system. Using a non-traditional, unfamiliar musical scale (Bohlen-Pierce scale), we created finite-state musical grammars from which we composed sets of melodies. After 25-30 min of passive exposure to the melodies, participants showed extensive learning as characterized by recognition, generalization, and sensitivity to the event frequencies in their given grammar, as well as increased preference for repeated melodies in the new musical system. Results provide evidence that a domain-general statistical learning mechanism may account for much of the human appreciation for music.
    Music Perception 06/2010; 27(5):377-388. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    Carla L Hudson Kam, Ann Chang
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    ABSTRACT: When language learners are exposed to inconsistent probabilistic grammatical patterns, they sometimes impose consistency on the language instead of learning the variation veridically. The authors hypothesized that this regularization results from problems with word retrieval rather than from learning per se. One prediction of this, that easing the demands of lexical retrieval leads to less regularization, was tested. Adult learners were exposed to a language containing inconsistent probabilistic patterns and were tested with either a standard production task or one of two tasks that reduced the demands of lexical retrieval. As predicted, participants tested with the modified tasks more closely matched the probability of the inconsistent items than did those tested with the standard task.
    Journal of Experimental Psychology Learning Memory and Cognition 06/2009; 35(3):815-21. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    Carla L Hudson Kam, Elissa L Newport
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    ABSTRACT: When natural language input contains grammatical forms that are used probabilistically and inconsistently, learners will sometimes reproduce the inconsistencies; but sometimes they will instead regularize the use of these forms, introducing consistency in the language that was not present in the input. In this paper we ask what produces such regularization. We conducted three artificial language experiments, varying the use of determiners in the types of inconsistency with which they are used, and also comparing adult and child learners. In Experiment 1 we presented adult learners with scattered inconsistency - the use of multiple determiners varying in frequency in the same context - and found that adults will reproduce these inconsistencies at low levels of scatter, but at very high levels of scatter will regularize the determiner system, producing the most frequent determiner form almost all the time. In Experiment 2 we showed that this is not merely the result of frequency: when determiners are used with low frequencies but in consistent contexts, adults will learn all of the determiners veridically. In Experiment 3 we compared adult and child learners, finding that children will almost always regularize inconsistent forms, whereas adult learners will only regularize the most complex inconsistencies. Taken together, these results suggest that regularization processes in natural language learning, such as those seen in the acquisition of language from non-native speakers or in the formation of young languages, may depend crucially on the nature of language learning by young children.
    Cognitive Psychology 04/2009; 59(1):30-66. · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines whether human learners can acquire statistics over abstract categories and their relationships to each other. Adult learners were exposed to miniature artificial languages containing variation in the ordering of the Subject, Object, and Verb constituents. Different orders (e.g. SOV, VSO) occurred in the input with different frequencies, but the occurrence of one order versus another was not predictable. Importantly, the language was constructed such that participants could only match the overall input probabilities if they were tracking statistics over abstract categories, not over individual words. At test, participants reproduced the probabilities present in the input with a high degree of accuracy. Closer examination revealed that learner's were matching the probabilities associated with individual verbs rather than the category as a whole. However, individual nouns had no impact on word orders produced. Thus, participants learned the probabilities of a particular ordering of the abstract grammatical categories Subject and Object associated with each verb. Results suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are capable of tracking relationships between abstract linguistic categories in addition to individual items.
    Language Learning and Development 04/2009; 5(2):115-145.
  • Whitney Goodrich, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: People gesture a great deal when speaking, and research has shown that listeners can interpret the information contained in gesture. The current research examines whether learners can also use co-speech gesture to inform language learning. Specifically, we examine whether listeners can use information contained in an iconic gesture to assign meaning to a novel verb form. Two experiments demonstrate that adults and 2-, 3-, and 4-year-old children can infer the meaning of novel intransitive verbs from gestures when no other source of information is present. The findings support the idea that gesture might be a source of input available to language learners.
    Developmental Science 02/2009; 12(1):81-7. · 3.89 Impact Factor
  • Amy S Finn, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated whether adult learners' knowledge of phonotactic restrictions on word forms from their first language impacts their ability to use statistical information to segment words in a novel language. Adults were exposed to a speech stream where English phonotactics and phoneme co-occurrence information conflicted. A control where these did not conflict was also run. Participants chose between words defined by novel statistics and words that are phonotactically possible in English, but had much lower phoneme contingencies. Control participants selected words defined by statistics while experimental participants did not. This result held up with increases in exposure and when segmentation was aided by telling participants a word prior to exposure. It was not the case that participants simply preferred English-sounding words, however, when the stimuli contained very short pauses, participants were able to learn the novel words despite the fact that they violated English phonotactics. Results suggest that prior linguistic knowledge can interfere with learners' abilities to segment words from running speech using purely statistical cues at initial exposure.
    Cognition 09/2008; 108(2):477-99. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    Carla L. Hudson Kam, Elissa L. Newport
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    ABSTRACT: In this article we investigate what learners acquire when their input contains in- consistent grammatical morphemes such as those present in pidgins and incipi- ent creoles. In particular, we ask if learners acquire variability veridically or if they change it, making the language more regular as they learn it. In Experi- ment 1 we taught adult participants an artificial language containing unpredict- able variation in 1 grammatical feature. We manipulated the amount of inconsis- tency and the meaning of the inconsistent item. Postexposure testing showed that participants learned the language, including the variable item, despite the presence of inconsistency. However, their use of variable items reflected their input. Participants exposed to consistent patterns produced consistent patterns, and participants exposed to inconsistency reproduced that inconsistency; they did not make the language more consistent. The meaning of the inconsistent item had no effect. In Experiment 2 we taught adults and 5- to 7-year-old chil- dren a similar artificial language. As in Experiment 1, the adults did not regu- larize the language. However, many children did regularize the language, impos- ing patterns that were not the same as their input. These results suggest that children and adults do not learn from variable input in the same way. Moreover, they suggest that children may play a unique and important role in creole for- mation by regularizing grammatical patterns.
    Language Learning and Development 01/2005; 1(2):151-195.
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    Amy S Finn, Carla L Hudson Kam
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate whether adult learners' knowledge of phonotactic restrictions on word forms from their first language (L1) impact their word segmentation abilities in a new language. Adult learners were exposed to a speech stream in which language specific and non-language specific cues for word segmentation were pitted against one another. English rules about possible phonetic combinations (phonotactics) and transitional probabilities of syllables conflicted such that predictive transitional probabilities generated words that were phonotactically impossible in English. A control with phonotactically viable items was also run. At test, participants choose between words defined by deterministic transitional probabilities and words that are phonotactically possible in English, but have much lower transitional probabilities. A baseline of their abilities to track transitional probabilities in the stimuli was also collected. Results suggest that although participants are able to track the transitional probabilities in these stimuli, they are not using them to segment and extract words. Control subjects, however, do use transitional probabilities to segment words. This pattern of results is resilient, holding up with substantial increases in exposure and even when segmentation is encouraged by explicitly giving participants one of the words in the stream prior to exposure.

Publication Stats

216 Citations
28.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Linguistics
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 2008–2011
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Psychology
      Berkeley, California, United States
  • 2010
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States