L A Finelli

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Maryland, United States

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Publications (14)85.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Humans have an individual profile of the electroencephalographic power spectra at the 8 to 16Hz frequency during non–rapid eye movement sleep that is stable over time and resistant to experimental perturbations. We tested the hypothesis that this electroencephalographic “fingerprint” is genetically determined, by recording 40 monozygotic and dizygotic twins during baseline and recovery sleep after prolonged wakefulness. We show a largely greater similarity within monozygotic than dizygotic pairs, resulting in a heritability estimate of 96%, not influenced by sleep need and intensity. If replicated, these results will establish the electroencephalographic profile during sleep as one of the most heritable traits of humans. Ann Neurol 2008
    Annals of Neurology 09/2008; 64(4):455 - 460. · 11.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neural circuits exploit numerous strategies for encoding information. Although the functional significance of individual coding mechanisms has been investigated, ways in which multiple mechanisms interact and integrate are not well understood. The locust olfactory system, in which dense, transiently synchronized spike trains across ensembles of antenna lobe (AL) neurons are transformed into a sparse representation in the mushroom body (MB; a region associated with memory), provides a well-studied preparation for investigating the interaction of multiple coding mechanisms. Recordings made in vivo from the insect MB demonstrated highly specific responses to odors in Kenyon cells (KCs). Typically, only a few KCs from the recorded population of neurons responded reliably when a specific odor was presented. Different odors induced responses in different KCs. Here, we explored with a biologically plausible model the possibility that a form of plasticity may control and tune synaptic weights of inputs to the mushroom body to ensure the specificity of KCs' responses to familiar or meaningful odors. We found that plasticity at the synapses between the AL and the MB efficiently regulated the delicate tuning necessary to selectively filter the intense AL oscillatory output and condense it to a sparse representation in the MB. Activity-dependent plasticity drove the observed specificity, reliability, and expected persistence of odor representations, suggesting a role for plasticity in information processing and making a testable prediction about synaptic plasticity at AL-MB synapses.
    PLoS Computational Biology 05/2008; 4(4):e1000062. · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Power spectra in the non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) have been shown to exhibit frequency-specific topographic features that may point to functional differences in brain regions. Here, we extend the analysis to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and waking (W) to determine the extent to which EEG topography is determined by state under two different levels of sleep pressure. Multichannel EEG recordings were obtained from young men during a baseline night, a 40-h waking period, and a recovery night. Sleep deprivation enhanced EEG power in the low-frequency range (1-8 Hz) in all three vigilance states. In NREMS, the effect was largest in the delta band, in W, in the theta band, while in REMS, there was a peak in both the delta and the theta band. The response of REMS to prolonged waking and its pattern of EEG topography was intermediate between NREMS and W. Cluster analysis revealed a major topographic segregation into three frequency bands (1-8 Hz, 9-15 Hz, 16-24 Hz), which was largely independent of state and sleep pressure. To assess individual topographic traits within each state, the differences between pairs of power maps were compared within (i.e., for baseline and recovery) and between individuals (i.e., separately for baseline and recovery). A high degree of intraindividual correspondence of the power maps was observed. The frequency-specific clustering of power maps suggests that distinct generators underlie EEG frequency bands. Although EEG power is modulated by state and sleep pressure, basic topographic features appear to be state-independent.
    NeuroImage 09/2006; 32(1):283-92. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    Luca A.  Finelli , Terrence J.  Sejnowski 
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    ABSTRACT: Learning procedural skills involves improvement in speed and accuracy. Walker proposes two stages of memory consolidation: enhancement, which requires sleep, and stabilization, which does not require sleep. Speed improvement for a motor learning task but not accuracy occurs after sleep-dependent enhancement. We discuss this finding in the context of computational models and underlying sleep mechanisms.
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences 01/2005; 28(01):70 - 71. · 18.57 Impact Factor
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    L A Finelli, P Achermann, A A Borbély
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    ABSTRACT: The sleep EEG of eight healthy young men was recorded from 27 derivations during a baseline night and a recovery night after 40 h of waking. Individual power maps of the nonREM sleep EEG were calculated for the delta, theta, alpha, sigma and beta range. The comparison of the normalized individual maps for baseline and recovery sleep revealed very similar individual patterns within each frequency band. This high correspondence was quantified and statistically confirmed by calculating the Manhattan distance between all pairs of maps within and between individuals. Although prolonged waking enhanced power in the low-frequency range (0.75-10.5 Hz) and reduced power in the high-frequency range (13.25-25 Hz), only minor effects on the individual topography were observed. Nevertheless, statistical analysis revealed frequency-specific regional effects of sleep deprivation. The results demonstrate that the pattern of the EEG power distribution in nonREM sleep is characteristic for an individual and may reflect individual traits of functional anatomy.
    Neuropsychopharmacology 12/2001; 25(5 Suppl):S57-62. · 8.68 Impact Factor
  • P Achermann, L A Finelli, A A Borbély
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    ABSTRACT: EEG power spectra exhibit site-specific and state-related differences in specific frequency bands. In the present study we investigated the effect of total sleep deprivation on sleep EEG topography. Eight healthy, young, right-handed subjects were recorded during baseline sleep and recovery sleep after sleep deprivation. Forty hours of sleep deprivation affected power spectra in all derivations. However, hemispheric asymmetries were observed in the delta range. Sleep deprivation enhanced the anterior predominance of delta activity in the left hemisphere but not in the right one. This effect may reflect a functional asymmetry between the dominant and non-dominant hemisphere. The results provide further evidence for the presence of both global and local aspects of sleep regulation.
    Brain Research 10/2001; 913(2):220-3. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • L A Finelli, A A Borbély, P Achermann
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    ABSTRACT: The sleep EEG of healthy young men was recorded during baseline and recovery sleep after 40 h of waking. To analyse the EEG topography, power spectra were computed from 27 derivations. Mean power maps of the nonREM sleep EEG were calculated for 1-Hz bins between 1.0 and 24.75 Hz. Cluster analysis revealed a topographic segregation into distinct frequency bands which were similar for baseline and recovery sleep, and corresponded closely to the traditional frequency bands. Hallmarks of the power maps were the frontal predominance in the delta and alpha band, the occipital predominance in the theta band, and the sharply delineated vertex maximum in the sigma band. The effect of sleep deprivation on EEG topography was determined by calculating the recovery/baseline ratio of the power spectra. Prolonged waking induced an increase in power in the low-frequency range (1-10.75 Hz) which was largest over the frontal region, and a decrease in power in the sigma band (13-15.75 Hz) which was most pronounced over the vertex. The topographic pattern of the recovery/baseline power ratio was similar to the power ratio between the first and second half of the baseline night. These results indicate that changes in sleep propensity are reflected by specific regional differences in EEG power. The predominant increase of low-frequency power in frontal areas may be due to a high 'recovery need' of the frontal heteromodal association areas of the cortex.
    European Journal of Neuroscience 07/2001; 13(12):2282-90. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study the role of GABA-ergic mechanisms in sleep regulation, the combined action of 40 h sleep deprivation and either 20 mg zolpidem or placebo on the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) were investigated by quantitative EEG analysis in eight young men who participated in a positron emission tomography study. Compared with baseline, sleep deprivation increased low-frequency (1.25-7.0 Hz) EEG power in nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in the placebo night. After administration of zolpidem, power in the 3.75-10.0 Hz range and 14.25-16.0 Hz band was reduced. The largest decrease was observed in the theta band. Comparison with placebo revealed that zolpidem attenuated power in the entire 1.75-11.0 Hz range. The plasma concentration of zolpidem at 4.5 h after intake showed a positive correlation with the drug-induced difference in power from placebo in the 14.25-16.0 Hz band. Regional EEG analysis based on bipolar derivations along the antero-posterior axis disclosed, for NREM sleep, a drug-induced posterior shift of power in the frequency range of 7.75-9.75 Hz. Zolpidem did not affect rapid eye movement deep spectra. We conclude that sleep deprivation and agonistic modulation of GABA(A) receptors have separate and additive effects-on power spectra and that their effects are mediated by different neurophysiological mechanisms.
    Journal of Sleep Research 07/2000; 9(2):175-183. · 3.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in the functional organization of the brain during the course of sleep and waking are reflected by different patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). To investigate the effect of the hypnotic zolpidem, a benzodiazepine receptor agonist, drug or placebo were administered to eight young, healthy men prior to bedtime. The subjects were sleep-deprived to promote sleep during the 4-h recording period in the positron emission tomography scanner. Intravenous injections of labelled water were administered during pre-drug wakefulness, and during Stage 2, Stage 4 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, each injection being followed by an emission scan. Statistical parametric mapping was used to investigate the effects of treatment and sleep states. During sleep (combined Stages 2 and 4, and REM sleep) relative rCBF was lower after zolpidem than after placebo in the basal ganglia and insula, and higher in the parietal cortex. A 'multiple study' analysis of REM sleep revealed that rCBF in the anterior cingulum was lower after zolpidem than after placebo, whereas rCBF in the occipital and parietal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus and cerebellum was higher. When the pooled data (drug and placebo) of Stages 2 and 4 were compared with wakefulness, rCBF was lower in prefrontal cortex and insula, and higher in the occipital and parietal cortex. The results indicate that some differences in rCBF from wakefulness to non-REM sleep are further augmented by zolpidem.
    Journal of Sleep Research 07/2000; 9(2):161-173. · 3.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in the functional organization of the brain during the course of sleep and waking are reflected by different patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). To investigate the effect of the hypnotic zolpidem, a benzodiazepine receptor agonist, drug or placebo were administered to eight young, healthy men prior to bedtime. The subjects were sleep-deprived to promote sleep during the 4-h recording period in the positron emission tomography scanner. Intravenous injections of labelled water were administered during pre-drug wakefulness, and during Stage 2, Stage 4 and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, each injection being followed by an emission scan. Statistical parametric mapping was used to investigate the effects of treatment and sleep states. During sleep (combined Stages 2 and 4, and REM sleep) relative rCBF was lower after zolpidem than after placebo in the basal ganglia and insula, and higher in the parietal cortex. A ‘multiple study’ analysis of REM sleep revealed that rCBF in the anterior cingulum was lower after zolpidem than after placebo, whereas rCBF in the occipital and parietal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus and cerebellum was higher. When the pooled data (drug and placebo) of Stages 2 and 4 were compared with wakefulness, rCBF was lower in prefrontal cortex and insula, and higher in the occipital and parietal cortex. The results indicate that some differences in rCBF from wakefulness to non-REM sleep are further augmented by zolpidem.
    Journal of Sleep Research 05/2000; 9(2):161 - 173. · 3.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the relationship between markers of sleep homeostasis during waking and sleep, the electroencephalogram of eight young males was recorded intermittently during a 40-h waking episode, as well as during baseline and recovery sleep. In the course of extended waking, spectral power of the electroencephalogram in the 5-8Hz band (theta activity) increased. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, power in the 0.75-4.5Hz band (slow-wave activity) was enhanced in the recovery night relative to baseline. Comparison of individual records revealed a positive correlation between the rise rate of theta activity during waking and the increase in slow-wave activity in the first non-rapid eye movement sleep episode. A topographic analysis based on 27 derivations showed that both effects were largest in frontal areas. From these results, we suggest that theta activity in waking and slow-wave activity in sleep are markers of a common homeostatic sleep process.
    Neuroscience 02/2000; 101(3):523-9. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effect on the sleep EEG, a 1-mg oral dose of SR 46349B, a novel 5-HT2 antagonist, was administered three hours before bedtime. The drug enhanced slow wave sleep (SWS) and reduced stage 2 without affecting subjective sleep quality. In nonREM sleep (NREMS) EEG slow-wave activity (SWA; power within 0.75–4.5 Hz) was increased and spindle frequency activity (SFA; power within 12.25–15 Hz) was decreased. The relative NREMS power spectrum showed a bimodal pattern with the main peak at 1.5 Hz and a secondary peak at 6 Hz. A regional analysis based on bipolar derivations along the antero-posterior axis revealed significant ‘treatment’ × ‘derivation’ interactions within the 9–16 Hz range. In enhancing SWA and attenuating SFA, the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation, whereas the pattern of the NREMS spectrum differed.
    Neuropsychopharmacology 01/1999; 21(3):455-466. · 8.68 Impact Factor
  • Neuropsychopharmacology 01/1999; 21(3). · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the locust olfactory system multiple intrinsic and circuit neuronal properties act together, conveying coincidence detection attributes to the decoders of olfactory information Kenyon cells (KCs) of the mushroom body (MB). Acting as coincidence detectors, KCs respond to selective odor specific patterns of synchronization across antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs). Using a computer model we explored whether synaptic plasticity of the AL afferents to the MB helps KCs to exploit the synchrony in the input spike trains. On a cycle-by-cycle basis we studied what combination of synchronous and asynchronous PN input patterns induced KC spiking, with particular attention for those selected and reinforced through spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at the KC dendrites. In the naive (before training) system, odor presentations elicited relatively dense response patterns in the MB, with olfactory representations characterized by the participation of several KCs (often >25%). However, response reliability was low, as most neurons fired less than one spike per trial. After learning, sparse responses involved typically 1 KC that fired reliably across trials. Joint analysis of the final synaptic strengths indicated that STDP selectively promoted ensembles with a large fraction of synchronous PNs and inhibited all others. While enhancing sparseness and selectivity of olfactory representations in KCs, STDP consistently reduced the jitter of the stimulus-locked KC spikes (32% lower after STDP, p

Publication Stats

652 Citations
85.80 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 2005–2008
    • Salk Institute
      La Jolla, California, United States
  • 2000–2001
    • University of Zurich
      • Institute of Veterinary Pharmakology and Toxicology
      Zürich, ZH, Switzerland