M.-H. Hay

Université de Montpellier 1, Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

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Publications (18)20.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background. To assess the feasibility of salvage intensity-modulated radiation Therapy (IMRT) and to examine clinical outcome. Patients and Methods. 57 patients were treated with salvage IMRT to the prostate bed in our center from January, 2007, to February, 2010. The mean prescription dose was 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Forty-four patients received concomitant androgen deprivation. Results. Doses to organs at risk were low without altering target volume coverage. Salvage IMRT was feasible without any grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal or urinary toxicity. With a median follow-up of 21 months, one grade 2 urinary and 1 grade ≥2 rectal late toxicities were reported. Biological relapse-free survival was 96.5% (2.3% (1/44) relapsed with androgen suppression and 7.7% (1/13) without). Conclusion. Salvage IMRT is feasible and results in low acute and chronic side-effects. Longer follow-up is warranted to draw conclusions in terms of oncologic control.
    ISRN urology. 01/2012; 2012:391705.
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    ABSTRACT: Cancers of the paranasal sinuses are rare tumors, with treatment based on a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery and radiation therapy, possibly associated with chemotherapy are used to obtain 5 years specific survival rate of 60-70 %. Advances in radiotherapy, including the use of imaging for 3D conformal approach require precise knowledge of the radioanatomy for this type of tumor to determine the different volumes of interest. Purpose of this study was to specify radioanatomy and conformal radiation modalities for cancers of the sinuses, and is illustrated by a case report.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 11/2010; 14 Suppl 1:S52-60. · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancers of the paranasal sinuses are rare tumors, with treatment based on a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery and radiation therapy, possibly associated with chemotherapy are used to obtain 5 years specific survival rate of 60–70 %. Advances in radiotherapy, including the use of imaging for 3D conformal approach require precise knowledge of the radioanatomy for this type of tumor to determine the different volumes of interest. Purpose of this study was to specify radioanatomy and conformal radiation modalities for cancers of the sinuses, and is illustrated by a case report.
    Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2010; 14.
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2010; 14(6):592-592.
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    ABSTRACT: More than one third of patients with localized prostate cancer at diagnosis who receive radical prostatectomy have histologically extraprostatic disease. Three randomized trials have demonstrated a significant benefit of postoperative radiotherapy for these patients in terms of biochemical progression-free survival, overall survival or metastasis-free survival in function of each study, at the cost of moderate acute and late toxicity. The technical developments of recent years have enabled the evolution of a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with better adaptation of the dose distribution to the shape of target volumes to preserve organs at risk while delivering the required dose volume target. This requires a thorough knowledge of the prostate cancer radioanatomy, ballistics and dosimetry. Purpose of this work was to specify epidemiological and radioanatomy characteristics for this tumor type and conformal radiation modalities illustrated by a case report.
    Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2010; 14.
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2009; 13(6):637-638.
  • Fuel and Energy Abstracts 01/2009; 75(3).
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the dose coverage of planning and clinical target volume (PTV, CTV), and organs-at-risk (OAR) between intensity-modulated (3D-IMRT) and conventional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) before and after internal organ variation in prostate cancer. We selected 10 patients with clinically significant interfraction volume changes. Patients were treated with 3D-IMRT to 80 Gy (minimum PTV dose of 76 Gy, excluding rectum). Fictitious, equivalent 3D-CRT plans (80 Gy at isocenter, with 95% isodose (76 Gy) coverage of PTV, with rectal blocking above 76 Gy) were generated using the same planning CT data set ("CT planning"). The plans were then also applied to a verification CT scan ("CT verify") obtained at a different moment. PTV, CTV, and OAR dose coverage were compared using non-parametric tests statistics for V95, V90 (% of the volume receiving 95 or 90% of the dose) and D50 (dose to 50% of the volume). Mean V95 of the PTV for "CT planning" was 94.3% (range, 88-99) vs 89.1% (range, 84-94.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p=0.005), respectively. Mean V95 of the CTV for "CT verify" was 97% for both 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT. Mean D50 of the rectum for "CT planning" was 26.8 Gy (range, 22-35) vs 43.5 Gy (range, 33.5-50.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p=0.0002), respectively. For "CT verify", this D50 was 31.1 Gy (range, 16.5-44) vs 44.2 Gy (range, 34-55) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p=0.006), respectively. V95 of the rectum was 0% for both plans for "CT planning", and 2.3% (3D-IMRT) vs 2.1% (3D-CRT) for "CT verify" (p=non-sig.). Dose coverage of the PTV and OAR was better with 3D-IMRT for each patient and remained so after internal volume changes.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 08/2008; 88(1):77-87. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2007; 11(6):418-418.
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2006; 10(6):496-497.
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    ABSTRACT: - To report our experience on treatment planning and acute toxicity in 16 patients suffering from clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). - Between March 2001 and October 2002, 16 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment planning included an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. All patients received the entire treatment course with IMRT to a prescribed dose of 78 Gy. All IMRT treatment plans were compared with a theoretical conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Acute lower gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated in all patients and graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE v. 3.0). A relationship between dose volume and clinical toxicity was evaluated. - Ninety-five percent of the PTV2 received more than 76 Gy using IMRT or 3D-CRT with no difference between both methods. The dose-volume histogram mean obtained for the PTV2 was not different between IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT improved homogeneity of the delivered dose to the PTV2 as compared with 3D-CRT (7.5 vs 9%, respectively). Ninety-five percent of the PTV1 received 5 Gy more using IMRT with protection of the bladder and the rectum walls. The benefit was considered below 75 and 70 Gy for the wall of the bladder and the rectum, respectively. Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity was observed in four (25%) and five (31%) patients, respectively. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. There was a trend towards a relationship between the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity but without statistical significant difference (P =0.09). - Dose escalation with IMRT is feasible with no grade 3 or higher acute GI or GU toxicity. Examination of a larger cohort and longer-term follow-up are warranted in the future.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 05/2004; 8(2):59-69. · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. – To report our experience on treatment planning and acute toxicity in 16 patients suffering from clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT).Patients and methods. – Between March 2001 and October 2002, 16 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment planning included an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. All patients received the entire treatment course with IMRT to a prescribed dose of 78 Gy. All IMRT treatment plans were compared with a theoretical conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Acute lower gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated in all patients and graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE v. 3.0). A relationship between dose volume and clinical toxicity was evaluated.Results. – Ninety-five percent of the PTV2 received more than 76 Gy using IMRT or 3D-CRT with no difference between both methods. The dose–volume histogram mean obtained for the PTV2 was not different between IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT improved homogeneity of the delivered dose to the PTV2 as compared with 3D-CRT (7.5 vs 9%, respectively). Ninety-five percent of the PTV1 received 5 Gy more using IMRT with protection of the bladder and the rectum walls. The benefit was considered below 75 and 70 Gy for the wall of the bladder and the rectum, respectively. Grade 2 GI and GU toxicity was observed in four (25%) and five (31%) patients, respectively. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. There was a trend towards a relationship between the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity but without statistical significant difference (P =0.09).Conclusion. – Dose escalation with IMRT is feasible with no grade 3 or higher acute GI or GU toxicity. Examination of a larger cohort and longer-term follow-up are warranted in the future.
    Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2004; 8(2):59-69.
  • Frontiers of radiation therapy and oncology 02/1997; 31:131-7.
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    ABSTRACT: We treated 31 soft tissue sarcoma bearing patients with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with ages ranging from 26 to 71: first curative intent treatment, 16 patients; and recurrent tumors, 15 patients. The tumor site was the pelvis and the retroperitoneal spaces in 13 patients and the limbs or the trunk in 18 patients. The histological type was: malignant histiocytofibroma, 14 patients; liposarcomas, 10 patients; malignant schwanoma, 1 patient; leiomyosarcoma, 2 patients; hemangiopericytoma, 1 patient; embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma, 2 patients; and synovialosarcoma, 1 patient. All the patients were diagnosed without any distant metastatic evolution at the moment of the treatment. All the patients except one underwent a complete surgical excision without any gross residual disease and received an intraoperative radiation single dose of 10 Gy in one case, 12.5 Gy in one case, 13 Gy in one case, 15 Gy in 17 cases, 18 Gy in three cases, 20 Gy in seven cases and 25 Gy in one case. Thereafter the treatment was completed by a postoperative X-ray dose of 45-50 Gy in 4.5-5 weeks for 16 patients. Local control (LC) was obtained in 27 out of 31 patients (87%), with a minimal follow-up duration of 2 years. Eleven out of 31 patients died: seven with local control (one from an intercurrent disease, six from distant metastasis) and four with local failure inside the IORT fields. Twenty patients are alive with no evolutive disease in 19 cases and with a distant metastasis in one case.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 03/1995; 34(2):160-3. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Pathologie Biologie 12/1992; 39(9):884-5. · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our study concerns 42 patients with chest wall recurrences from breast cancer: 17 Stage 1 (less than 4 cm in diameter), 11 Stage 2 (more than 4 cm), seven Stage 3 (skin ulceration whatever tumor size), and seven Stage 4 (neoplastic lymphangitis and/or skin nodules covering chest wall beyond midline). All the patients were treated with 2450 MHz microwaves by means of a generator with 4 magnetrons (250 to 300 W) and arterial applicators delivering 5 to 10 W/cm2. Each applicator is coupled with an infrared thermometer allowing an atraumatic temperature control processed by a PC-compatible computer using a Turbo Pascal program. A temperature of 41.5 degrees C to 42.5 degrees C was maintained for 45 minutes from the skin surface to a 2.5-cm depth within tissues. Hyperthermia alone was done in four patients; hyperthermia was combined with chemotherapy in four patients, and with electrontherapy (2 X 450 cGy or 3 X 350 cGy/week) in 34 patients: tumor dose under 3000 cGy in seven patients and over 3000 cGy in 27 patients. We observed a complete response in 22 patients (52.3%), a partial response (greater than 50%) in 11 patients (26.1%), and no response in nine patients (21.4%). No complete response was observed in patients treated with hyperthermia alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy. The local control was demonstrated to be improved only in patients treated with hyperthermia and radiotherapy. The results were correlated with tumor stage: ten complete responses out of 12 Stage 1, and one complete response out of four Stage 4. We noted nine side effects completely reversible within a month with no late skin reaction. Our results show that hyperthermia can give improved local control without any morbidity in treating chest wall recurrences of breast cancer.
    Cancer 10/1990; 66(5):848-52. · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • Progress in clinical and biological research 02/1982; 107:605-10.
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    ABSTRACT: Radiation therapy is now widely accepted as an efficacious treatment of localized prostate cancer. The technical developments of recent years have enabled the evolution of a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, offering a better adaptation of the dose distribution, and leading therefore to preserve organs at risk. In addition, the required dose delivered to the target volume permit physician to increase the total dose if necessary. This requires a thorough knowledge of the radio-anatomy of the prostate, the natural history of the disease but also the ballistics and dosimetry. The objectives of this work were to detail epidemiology and radio-anatomy of the prostate cancer. In addition, conformal radiation modalities are illustrated by a case report.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 14:S161–S173. · 1.48 Impact Factor