F Ji

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States

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Publications (5)10.47 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this experiment were 1) to determine if dietary soybean oil (SBO) affects the NE of corn when fed to growing or finishing pigs, 2) to determine if possible effects of dietary SBO on the NE of corn differ between growing and finishing pigs, and 3) to determine effects of SBO on pig growth performance and retention of energy, protein, and lipids. Forty-eight growing (initial BW: 27.3 ± 2.5 kg) and 48 finishing (initial BW: 86.0 ± 3.0 kg) barrows were used, and within each stage of growth, pigs were allotted to 1 of 6 groups. Two groups at each stage of growth served as an initial slaughter group. The remaining 4 groups were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments and pigs in these groups were harvested at the conclusion of the experiment. A low-lipid basal diet containing corn, soybean meal, and no added SBO and a high-lipid basal diet containing corn, soybean meal, and 8% SBO were formulated at each stage of growth. Two additional diets at each stage of growth were formulated by mixing 25% corn and 75% of the low-lipid basal diet or 25% corn and 75% of the high-lipid basal diet. Results indicated that addition of SBO had no effects on growth performance, carcass composition, or retention of energy, protein, and lipids but increased (P < 0.05) apparent total tract digestibility of acid hydrolyzed ether extract and GE. Addition of SBO also increased (P < 0.05) DE and NE of diets, but had no effect on the DE and NE of corn. Finishing pigs had greater (P < 0.05) growth performance and retention of energy, protein, and lipids than growing pigs. A greater (P < 0.05) DE and NE of diets was observed for finishing pigs than for growing pigs and the DE and NE of corn was also greater (P < 0.05) for finishing pigs than for growing pigs. In conclusion, addition of SBO increases the DE and NE of diets but has no impact on the DE and NE of corn. Diets fed to finishing pigs have greater DE and NE values than diets fed to growing pigs and the DE and NE of corn are greater for finishing pigs than for growing pigs.
    Journal of Animal Science 07/2013; 91(7):3283-3290. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this experiment were: 1) to determine if dietary soybean oil (SBO) affects the NE of corn when fed to growing or finishing pigs, 2) to determine if possible effects of dietary SBO on the NE of corn differ between growing and finishing pigs; and 3) to determine effects of SBO on pig growth performance and retention of energy, protein, and lipids. Forty eight growing (initial BW: 27.3 ± 2.5 kg) and 48 finishing (initial BW: 86.0 ± 3.0 kg) barrows were used, and within each stage of growth, pigs were allotted to 1 of 6 groups. Two groups at each stage of growth served as an initial slaughter group. The remaining 4 groups were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments and pigs in these groups were harvested at the conclusion of the experiment. A low-lipid basal diet containing corn, soybean meal, and no added SBO, and a high-lipid basal diet containing corn, soybean meal, and 8% SBO were formulated at each stage of growth. Two additional diets at each stage of growth were formulated by mixing 25% corn and 75% of the low-lipid basal diet or 25% corn and 75% of the high-lipid basal diet. Results indicated that addition of SBO had no effects on growth performance, carcass composition, or retention of energy, protein, and lipids, but increased (P < 0.05) apparent total tract digestibility of acid-hydrolyzed ether extract and GE. Addition of SBO also increased (P < 0.05) DE and NE of diets, but had no effect on the DE and NE of corn. Finishing pigs had greater (P < 0.05) growth performance and retention of energy, protein, and lipids than growing pigs. A greater (P < 0.05) DE and NE of diets was observed for finishing pigs than for growing pigs and the DE and NE of corn was also greater (P < 0.05) for finishing pigs than for growing pigs. In conclusion, addition of SBO increases the DE and NE of diets, but has no impact on the DE and NE of corn. Diets fed to finishing pigs have greater DE and NE values than diets fed to growing pigs and the DE and NE of corn are greater for finishing pigs than for growing pigs.
    Journal of Animal Science 05/2013; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this experiment were: 1) to determine the effect of dietary soybean hulls (SBH) and wheat middlings (WM) on body composition, nutrient and energy retention, and the NE of diets and ingredients fed to growing or finishing pigs, and 2) to determine if finishing pigs utilize the energy in SBH and WM more efficiently than growing pigs. Forty growing barrows (initial BW: 25.4 ± 0.7 kg) and 40 finishing barrows (initial BW: 84.8 ± 0.9 kg) were randomly allotted to 5 groups within each stage of growth. Two groups at each stage of growth served as the initial slaughter group. The remaining pigs were randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments and harvested at the conclusion of the experiment. The basal diet was based on corn and soybean meal and formulated to be adequate in all nutrients. Two additional diets were formulated by mixing 70% of the basal diet and 30% SBH or 30% WM. In the growing phase, ADG, G:F, and retention of lipids were greater (P < 0.05) for pigs fed the basal diet than for pigs fed the diets containing SBH or WM. Retention of energy was also greater (P < 0.05) for pigs fed the basal diet than for pigs fed the SBH. In the finishing phase, pigs fed the SBH diet tended (P = 0.10) to have a greater ADG than pigs fed the WM diet, and energy retention was greater (P < 0.05) for pigs fed the basal diet than for pigs fed the WM diet. The NE of the basal diet fed to growing pigs was greater (P < 0.01) than the NE of the diets containing SBH or WM, and there was a tendency for a greater (P = 0.05) NE of the basal diet than of the other diets when fed to finishing pigs. The NE of SBH did not differ from the NE of WM in either growing or finishing pigs, and there was no interaction between ingredients and stage of growth on the NE of diets or ingredients. The NE of diets for growing pigs (1,668 kcal/kg) was not different from the NE of diets for finishing pigs (1,823 kcal/kg) and the NE of the diets containing SBH (1,688 kcal/kg) was not different from the NE of the diets containing WM (1,803 kcal/kg). Likewise, the NE of SBH (603 kcal/kg) did not differ from the NE of WM (987 kcal/kg). In conclusion, inclusion of 30% SBH or WM decreases the performance and nutrient retention in growing pigs, but has little impact on finishing pigs. The NE of the diets decreases with the inclusion of SBH and WM, but the NE of diets and ingredients is not affected by the BW of pigs. The NE of SBH is not different from the NE of WM.
    Journal of Animal Science 03/2013; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this experiment were 1) to determine the NE of soybean oil (SBO) and choice white grease (CWG) fed to growing and finishing pigs, 2) to evaluate the effects of inclusion rate of SBO on the NE by growing and finishing pigs, and 3) to determine if there is a difference in the NE of SBO and CWG between growing and finishing pigs. Forty-eight growing (initial BW: 22.13 ± 1.78 kg) and 48 finishing (initial BW: 84.17 ± 5.80 kg) barrows were used, and they were housed and fed individually. Within each stage of growth, pigs were allotted to 8 outcome groups of 6 barrows based on BW. Within each outcome group, pigs were randomly allotted to 1 of 6 groups. Two groups at each stage of growth served as an initial slaughter group. Pigs in the remaining groups were assigned to 4 dietary treatments and slaughtered at the conclusion of the experiment. The basal diet contained corn, soybean meal, and no supplemental lipids. Three additional diets were formulated by mixing 95% of the basal diet and 5% SBO, 90% of the basal diet and 10% SBO, or 90% of the basal diet and 10% CWG. Average daily gain and G:F for finishing pigs and apparent total tract digestibility of energy for growing and finishing pigs increased (linear, P < 0.05) with lipid content, but was not affected by lipid source. The lipid gain:protein gain ratio and the energy retention also increased (linear, P ≤ 0.05) with lipid content in growing and finishing pigs. There were no interactive effects between lipid content and stage of growth or between lipid source and stage of growth on the NE of diets and the NE of dietary lipids. The NE of diets increased (linear, P < 0.01) with increasing SBO (2,056, 2,206, and 2,318 kcal/kg for diets containing 0, 5, or 10% SBO). The NE of the diet containing 10% CWG (2,440 kcal/kg) was greater (P < 0.05) than the NE of the diet containing 10% SBO. The NE of diets was greater (P < 0.05) for finishing pigs than for growing pigs regardless of lipid content or source. The NE of SBO included at 5% (5,073 kcal/kg) was not different from the NE of SBO included at 10% (4,679 kcal/kg), but the NE of CWG (5,900 kcal/kg) was greater (P < 0.05) than the NE of SBO. The stage of growth had no impact on the NE of SBO or CWG. In conclusion, the NE of lipids is not affected by the content of dietary lipids, but the NE of CWG is greater than the NE of SBO.
    Journal of Animal Science 10/2010; 89(2):448-59. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of a beta-glucanase-protease enzyme blend product (EBP) on fecal digestibility (FD), apparent ileal digestibility (AID), standardized ileal digestibility, and digestibility in the hindgut of growing pigs. Twelve ileal-cannulated, growing barrows (38.2 +/- 0.5 kg) were housed in individual metabolism crates, blocked by previous feed intake into 3 groups with 4 pigs each, and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments within a square (group) of 3 replications of 4 x 4 Latin square design. Treatments were basal diet (Basal), Basal + 0.05% of EBP (0.05% EBP), Basal + 0.10% of EBP (0.10% EBP), and hydrolyzed casein for measurement of endogenous amino acids. The Basal diet consisted of corn and soybean meal and was calculated to have 3.36 Mcal of ME/kg and 1.1% of total lysine, as-fed basis. Feed intake of each replicate of the Latin square during the first period was 85% of the minimum feed intake of the 4 pigs during the preliminary period and was equalized within each square. The feeding level was increased by 100 g/d in each subsequent period. Each of the experimental periods was 14 d, including 4 d of dietary adaptation, 5 d of fecal collection, 3 d of transition period, and 2 d of ileal collection. Ileal effluents were collected continuously for the same 12-h interval each day. Pigs fed the EBP demonstrated increased (P < 0.05) FD of DM, OM, energy, CP, nonfiber carbohydrate, total dietary fiber, insoluble dietary fiber, acid-hydrolyzed fat, ash, Ca, and P compared with pigs fed Basal. The AID of NDF and hemicellulose was increased (P < 0.05) by supplying the EBP either at 0.05 or 0.10% in the diets, but AID of DM and energy was not increased. The AID of acid-hydrolyzed fat tended to be greater (P = 0.051) for the pigs fed the EBP than for those fed Basal. Ileal digestibility of most amino acids was not affected by treatment, but the EBP reduced the apparent and standardized digestibility of methionine, alanine, and serine (P < 0.05). The difference between FD and AID of hemicellulose was lower (P < 0.05) for the pigs fed the EBP than for those fed Basal. These results demonstrated that the EBP fed to growing pigs improved the FD of DM, OM, energy, CP, nonfiber carbohydrate, total dietary fiber, acid-hydrolyzed fat, Ca, and P, and the AID of NDF and hemi-cellulose, but the standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids was not improved by supplying the EBP in corn-soybean meal-based diets of growing pigs.
    Journal of Animal Science 07/2008; 86(7):1533-43. · 2.09 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

11 Citations
10.47 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Department of Animal Sciences
      Urbana, IL, United States