J A Gossage

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (31)65.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is established in the management of most resectable esophageal and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas. However, assessing the downstaging effects of chemotherapy and predicting response to treatment remain challenging, and the relative importance of tumor stage before and after chemotherapy is debatable.
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The optimal surgical approach to tumours of the oesophagus and oesophagogastric junction remains controversial. The principal randomized trial comparing transhiatal (THO) and transthoracic (TTO) oesophagectomy showed no survival difference, but suggested that some subgroups of patients may benefit from the more extended lymphadenectomy typically conducted with TTO. This was a cohort study based on two prospectively created databases. Short- and long-term outcomes for patients undergoing THO and TTO were compared. The primary outcome measure was overall survival, with secondary outcomes including time to recurrence and patterns of disease relapse. A Cox proportional hazards model provided hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 per cent confidence intervals (c.i.), with adjustments for age, tumour stage, tumour grade, response to chemotherapy and lymphovascular invasion. Of 664 included patients (263 THO, 401 TTO), the distributions of age, sex and histological subtype were similar between the groups. In-hospital mortality (1·1 versus 3·2 per cent for THO and TTO respectively; P = 0·110) and in-hospital stay (14 versus 17 days respectively; P < 0·001) favoured THO. In the adjusted model, there was no difference in overall survival (HR 1·07, 95 per cent c.i. 0·84 to 1·36) or time to tumour recurrence (HR 0·99, 0·76 to 1·29) between the two operations. Local tumour recurrence patterns were similar (22·8 versus 24·4 per cent for THO and TTO respectively). No subgroup could be identified of patients who had benefited from more radical surgery on the basis of tumour location or stage. There was no difference in survival or tumour recurrence for TTO and THO.
    British Journal of Surgery 02/2014; · 4.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. • Changes in CT body composition occur after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oesophageal cancer. • Sarcopenia was more prevalent after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • Fat mass, fat-free mass and weight decreased after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • Changes in body composition were associated with CRM positivity. • Changes in body composition did not affect perioperative complications and survival.
    European Radiology 02/2014; · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The consequences of major conduit necrosis following oesophagectomy are devastating. Jejunal interposition with vascular supercharging is an alternative reconstructive method if colon is unavailable. Aims of this study were to review the long-term outcome and quality of life of patients undergoing this surgery in our tertiary unit. Methods Patients undergoing oesophageal reconstruction with supercharged jejunum were identified and retrospective review of hospital notes performed. Each patient was then interviewed for follow up data and quality of life assessment using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Results Six patients (5 men) (median age 59 years (range 34–72) underwent supercharged pedicled jejunal (SPJ) interposition from May 2005–August 2010. Indications for surgery were loss of both gastric and colonic conduits following surgery for oesophageal cancer (n = 4), loss of gastric conduit and previous colectomy (n = 1) and lastly, gastric and colonic infarction in a strangulated paraoesophageal hernia (n = 1). Median time to reconstruction was 12 months [6–15 range]. There were no in-hospital deaths. Median postoperative stay was 46 days [13–118]. Three patients required surgical re-intervention for leak, sepsis and reflux, respectively. Median follow up was 6.5 years [range 7–102 months]. One patient died seven months following surgery due to respiratory complications. On follow up, 5 patients have an enteral diet without supplemental nutrition, maintaining weight and good quality of life scores. Conclusions Supercharged jejunal interposition is a suitable alternative conduit for delayed oesophageal replacement in patients with otherwise limited reconstructive options. Good functional outcomes can be achieved despite formidable technical challenges in this group.
    The surgeon: journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland 01/2014; · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The influence of reoperation on long-term prognosis is unknown. In this large population-based cohort study, it was aimed to investigate the influence of a reoperation within 30 days of oesophageal cancer resection on survival even after excluding the initial postoperative period. This was a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study. All hospitals performing oesophageal cancer resections during the study period (1987-2010) in Sweden. Patients operated for oesophageal cancer with curative intent in 1987-2010. Adjusted HRs of all cause, early and late mortality up to 5 years after reoperation following oesophageal cancer resection. Among 1822 included patients, the 200 (11%) who were reoperated had a 27% increased HR of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.53) and 28% increased HR of disease-specific mortality (adjusted HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.59), compared to those not reoperated. Reoperation for anastomotic insufficiency in particular was followed by an increased mortality (adjusted HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.19 to 2.76). This large and population-based nationwide cohort study shows that reoperation within 30 days after primary oesophageal resection was associated with increased mortality, even after excluding the initial 3 months after surgery. This finding stresses the need to consider any actions that might prevent complications and reoperation after oesophageal cancer resection.
    BMJ Open 01/2014; 4(3):e004648. · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is established in the management of most resectable esophageal and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas. However, assessing the downstaging effects of chemotherapy and predicting response to treatment remain challenging, and the relative importance of tumor stage before and after chemotherapy is debatable. METHODS: We analyzed consecutive resections for esophageal or esophagogastric junction adenocarcinomas performed at two high-volume cancer centers in London between 2000 and 2010. After standard investigations and multidisciplinary team consensus, all patients were allocated a clinical tumor stage before treatment, which was compared with pathologic stage after surgical resection. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 584 included patients, 400 patients (68%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with downstaged tumors after neoadjuvant chemotherapy experienced improved survival compared with patients without response (P < .001), and such downstaging (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.59) was the strongest independent predictor of survival after adjusting for patient age, tumor grade, clinical tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, resection margin status, and surgical resection type. Patients downstaged by chemotherapy, compared with patients with no response, experienced lower rates of local recurrence (6% v 13%, respectively; P = .030) and systemic recurrence (19% v 29%, respectively; P = .027) and improved Mandard tumor regression scores (P < .001). Survival was strongly dictated by stage after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, rather than clinical stage at presentation. CONCLUSION: The stage of esophageal or esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant chemotherapy determines prognosis rather than the clinical stage before neoadjuvant chemotherapy, indicating the importance of focusing on postchemotherapy staging to more accurately predict outcome and eligibility for surgery. Patients who are downstaged by neoadjuvant chemotherapy benefit from reduced rates of local and systemic recurrence.
    J Clin Oncol. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate selection of patients for radical treatment of esophageal cancer is essential to avoid early recurrence and death (ERD) after surgery. We sought to evaluate a large series of consecutive resections to assess factors that may be associated with this poor outcome. This was a cohort study including 680 patients operated for esophageal cancer between 2000 and 2010. The poor outcome group comprised 100 patients with tumor recurrence and death within 1 year of surgery. The comparison group comprised 267 long-term survivors, defined as those surviving more than 3 years from surgery. Pathological characteristics associated with poor outcome were analyzed using logistic regression to determine odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). On the adjusted model T stage and N stage predicted poor survival, with the greatest risk being patients with locally advanced tumors and three or more involved lymph nodes (OR 10.6, 95% CI 2.8-40.0). Poor differentiation (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.5), chemotherapy response (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2-10.6), and involved resection margins (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.0) were all significant independent prognostic markers in the multivariable model. There was a trend toward worse survival with lymphovascular invasion (OR 2.0, 95% CI 0.9-4.2) and low albumin (OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.8-4.4) but not of statistical significance in the adjusted model. Esophageal cancer patients with poorly differentiated tumors and three or more involved lymph nodes have a particularly high risk of ERD after surgery. Accurate risk stratification of patients may identify a group who would be better served by alternative oncological treatment strategies. J. Surg. Oncol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Surgical Oncology 12/2013; · 2.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reflux frequently occurs after a gastric conduit has replaced the resected esophagus. In this Swedish population-based cohort study, the potential antireflux effects of using cervical anastomosis, intrathoracic antireflux anastomosis, or pyloric drainage, and a risk of dysphagia due to cervical anastomosis and intrathoracic antireflux anastomosis were studied. METHODS: Patients undergoing esophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction in 2001-2005 were included. Reflux symptoms and dysphagia were assessed 6 months and 3 years postoperatively using a validated questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-OES18). The study exposures were cervical anastomosis, antireflux anastomosis, and pyloric drainage procedure. Multivariable logistic regression and propensity-adjusted analyses based on multinomial logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounding. RESULTS: A total of 304 patients were included in the study. Adjusted ORs for reflux symptoms were 0.9 (95 % CI 0.3-2.2) for patients with a cervical anastomosis compared to patients with an intrathoracic anastomosis, 0.9 (95 % CI 0.4-2.0) for patients with an antireflux anastomosis versus patients with a conventional anastomosis, and 1.5 (95 % CI 0.9-2.6) for patients after pyloric drainage versus patients without such a pyloric drainage procedure. Dysphagia was not statistically significantly increased after cervical anastomosis or antireflux anastomosis. ORs were virtually similar 3 years after surgery. No interactions were identified. The propensity analyses rendered similar results as the logistic regression models, except for a possibly increased dysphagia with a cervical anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical anastomosis, antireflux anastomosis, and pyloric drainage do not seem to prevent reflux symptoms 6 months or 3 years after esophagectomy for cancer with a gastric conduit.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 06/2013; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    Cara R Baker, James A Gossage, Robert C Mason
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    ABSTRACT: We present a 52-year-old gentleman with an unusual cause of progressive dysphagia, namely due to extrinsic lower oesophageal compression from a cystic mass of the posterior mediastinum. Cystic masses in adults are uncommon, and there is a wide differential diagnosis. This includes neoplastic, such as germ cell tumour (cystic teratoma), and non-neoplastic aetiologies. The later include foregut duplication cysts, lymphatic malformations, infective (hydatid), simple mediastinal cysts or pseudocysts. Management is principally surgical with complete excision, or alternatively, in cases of benign cysts, marsupialization or decompression. In our patient, a simple mediastinal cyst was diagnosed and this case is the first description of a totally transabdominal approach to mediastinal cyst decompression by a Roux-en-Y cyst-jejunostomy.
    Journal of surgical case reports. 01/2013; 2013(3).
  • J A Gossage, M J Forshaw
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately, 50,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United Kingdom resulting in a number of negligence claims referred to the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and outcomes of claims reported to the NHSLA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed in England between 1995 and 2008. Data were requested from the NHSLA on all claims related to laparoscopic cholecystectomy which occurred in England between 1995 and 2008. A review of the data provided by the NHSLA data identified over 300 claims in this time period. Of the claims identified, 244 have been completed. Common bile duct injury (41%), bile leak (12%), bowel injury (9%), haemorrhage (9%) and fatality (9%) were the most frequent types of claim. Common bile duct injury resulted in the highest proportion of successful claims (86%) and the largest sums paid to the claimant (average £65,000). Common bile duct injury is the most common claim to the NHSLA after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and results in the highest proportion of successful claims and the largest sums paid to the claimant.
    International Journal of Clinical Practice 12/2010; 64(13):1832-5. · 2.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous studies showed that the direct injection of an adenovirus construct expressing urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) into experimental venous thrombi significantly reduces thrombus weight. The systemic use of adenovirus vectors is limited by inherent hepatic tropism and inflammatory response. As macrophages are recruited into venous thrombi, it is reasonable to speculate that these cells could be used to target the adenovirus uPA (ad-uPA) gene construct to the thrombus. The aims of this study were to determine whether macrophages transduced with ad-uPA have increased fibrinolytic activity and whether systemic injection of transduced cells could be used to target uPA expression to the thrombus and reduce its size. The effect of up-regulating uPA was examined in an immortalized macrophage cell line (MM6) and macrophages differentiated from human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (HBMMs). Cells were infected with ad-uPA or blank control virus (ad-blank). Fibrinolytic mediator expression, cell viability, and cytokine expression were measured by activity assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Monocyte migration was measured using a modified Boyden chamber assay. A model of venous thrombosis was developed and characterized in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This model was used to study whether systemically administered macrophages over-expressing uPA reduced thrombus size. Uptake of HBMMs into the thrombus induced in these mice was confirmed by a combination of PKH2-labeled cell tracking and colocalization with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) by immunohistology. Compared with ad-blank, treated HBMMs transduction with ad-uPA increased uPA production by >1000-fold (P = .003), uPA activity by 150-fold (P = .0001), and soluble uPA receptor (uPAR) by almost twofold (P = .043). Expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and PAI-2 was decreased by about twofold (P = .011) and threefold (P = .005), respectively. Up-regulation of uPA had no effect on cell viability or inflammatory cytokine production compared with ad-blank or untreated cells. Ad-uPA transduction increased the migration rate of HBMMs (about 20%, P = .03) and MM6 cells (>twofold, P = .005) compared with ad-blank treated controls. Human macrophage recruitment into the mouse thrombus was confirmed by the colocalization of HLA with the PKH2-marked cells. Systemic injection of uPA-up-regulated HBMMs reduced thrombus weight by approximately 20% compared with ad-blank (P = .038) or sham-treated controls (P = .0028). Transduction of HBBM with ad-uPA increases their fibrinolytic activity. Systemic administration of uPA up-regulated HBBMs reduced thrombus size in an experimental model of venous thrombosis. Alternative methods of delivering fibrinolytic agents are worth exploring.
    Journal of vascular surgery: official publication, the Society for Vascular Surgery [and] International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter 08/2009; 50(5):1127-34. · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Health Service (NHS) Cancer Plan aims to eliminate economic inequalities in healthcare provision and cancer outcomes. This study examined the influence of economic status upon the incidence, access to treatment and survival from oesophageal and gastric cancer in a single UK cancer network. A total of 3619 patients diagnosed with either oesophageal or gastric cancer in a London Cancer Network (population = 1.48 million) were identified from the Thames Cancer Registry (1993-2002). Patients were ranked into economic quintiles using the income domain of the Multiple Index of Deprivation. Statistical analysis was performed using a chi(2) test. Survival analysis was performed using a Cox's proportional hazards model. Between 1993-1995 and 2000-2002, the incidence of oesophageal cancer in the most affluent males rose by 51% compared with a 2% rise in the least affluent males. The incidence of gastric cancer in most affluent males between 1993-1995 and 2000-2002 fell by 32% compared with a 7% fall in the least affluent males. These changes were less marked in females. Economic deprivation had no effect on the proportion of patients undergoing either resectional surgery or chemotherapy; the least affluent oesophageal cancer patients with a higher incidence of squamous cell carcinoma received significantly more radiotherapy. Economic deprivation had no effect upon survival for either oesophageal or gastric cancer. There has been an increase in oesophageal cancer and a decrease in gastric cancer incidence among more affluent males in the last 10 years. Economic status did not appear to influence access to treatment or survival.
    International Journal of Clinical Practice 07/2009; 63(6):859-64. · 2.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adenocarcinoid of the appendix is a rare malignant tumour with features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid, showing both epithelial and endocrine differentiation. Mucinous cystadenoma is the commonest of the benign neoplasms of the appendix, with an incidence of 0.6% in appendicectomy specimens. We report a rare combination of these tumours and discuss the latest treatment options. To the best of our knowledge, only six cases have been reported in the literature to date. A 71-year-old Caucasian man presented to our department with a right iliac fossa mass associated with pain. Laparoscopy revealed an adenocarcinoid of the appendix in combination with mucinous cystadenoma. He underwent a radical right hemicolectomy with clear margins and lymph nodes. Adenocarcinoids account for 2% of primary appendiceal malignancies. Most tumours are less than 2 cm in diameter and 20% of them metastasize to the ovaries. The mean age for presentation is 59 years and the 5-year survival rate ranges from 60% to 84%. Right hemicolectomy is generally advised if any of the following features are present: tumours greater than 2 cm, involvement of resection margins, greater than 2 mitoses/10 high-power fields on histology, extension of tumour beyond serosa. Chemotherapy mostly with 5-Fluorouracil and Leucovorin is advised for remnant disease after surgery. Cytoreductive surgery with intraperitoneal chemotherapy can offer improved survival for advanced peritoneal dissemination.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 02/2009; 3:28.
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea has become an important health problem in UK hospitals but surgical intervention is rarely required. There is little evidence regarding best practice for patients requiring surgical intervention. The aim of this multicentre study was to review our experience in patients requiring surgery for C. difficile colitis. Patients who underwent surgery for C. difficile colitis in 5 hospitals in Southeast England over a 7-year period (1 teaching hospital and 4 district general hospitals) were identified from histopathology databases. Data were collected regarding the presentation, indication for surgery and post-operative outcomes. 15 patients (9 males; mean age=71 years (range 35-84 years)) underwent surgery. 46% of patients (n=7) contracted C. difficile during their hospital admission for other medical reasons and 73% of patients were initially admitted under other medical specialties. Diagnosis was only made preoperatively in 8 patients (53%). Indications for surgery were peritonitis and systemic toxicity (n=12), failure of medical management (n=2) and unresolving large bowel dilatation (n=1). 12 patients underwent total colectomy and the rest underwent segmental resection. All patients were admitted to the intensive care unit post operatively with a mean stay of 6 days. 2 patients needed a second look laparotomy. Mortality rate was 67% (n=10), with all but 1 patient dying within the 30-day mortality period. The mean length of hospital stay of survivors was 30 days (range 17-72). Surgical intervention for C. difficile colitis remains uncommon. Total colectomy and end ileostomy is the procedure of choice. The outlook for patients requiring surgery remains poor.
    International Journal of Surgery (London, England) 12/2008; 7(1):78-81. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    E Au, J A Gossage, S R Bailey
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    ABSTRACT: Surgeons frequently sustain needlestick injuries when operating. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and reporting rate of needlestick injuries at one institution. A questionnaire was distributed anonymously to 69 surgeons of all grades and specialties in a district general hospital in the UK. The questionnaire was returned by 42 surgeons (60.9%). There were 840 needlestick injuries over two years, of which 126 caused bleeding. Senior surgeons who spent more hours operating per week had a higher rate of needlestick injuries compared with junior surgeons (29.1 vs 6.59 injuries per surgeon over two years). Of the total number of injuries, 19 (2.26%) were reported to Occupational Health according to the surgeons questioned, but only six reported incidents were found in the Occupational Health records. Junior surgeons were significantly more likely to report needlestick injuries than senior surgeons (9.82% vs 1.10% of injuries reported, P=0.0000045). The main reasons for failure to report needlestick injuries were due to the lack of time and excessive paperwork. Seventy-three percent of surgeons did not routinely use double gloves when operating, mainly because of decreased hand sensation. The rate of needlestick injury reporting by surgeons at this institution is extremely low. Previous studies have shown a higher reporting rate suggesting that, despite awareness of blood-borne infections, surgeons are still not following recommended protocols.
    Journal of Hospital Infection 08/2008; 70(1):66-70. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rapid thrombus recanalization reduces the incidence of post-thrombotic complications. This study aimed to discover whether adenovirus-mediated transfection of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene (ad.VEGF) enhanced thrombus recanalization and resolution. In rats, thrombi were directly injected with either ad.VEGF (n=40) or ad.GFP (n=37). Thrombi in SCID mice (n=12) were injected with human macrophages transfected with ad.VEGF or ad.GFP. Thrombi were analyzed at 1 to 14 days. GFP was found mainly in the vein wall and adventitia by 3 days, but was predominantly found in cells within the body of thrombus by day 7. VEGF levels peaked at 4 days (376+/-299 pg/mg protein). Ad.VEGF treatment reduced thrombus size by >50% (47.7+/-5.1 mm(2) to 22.0+/-4.0 mm(2), P=0.0003) and increased recanalization by >3-fold (3.9+/-0.69% to 13.6+/-4.1%, P=0.024) compared with controls. Ad.VEGF treatment increased macrophage recruitment into the thrombus by more than 50% (P=0.002). Ad.VEGF-transfected macrophages reduced thrombus size by 30% compared with controls (12.3+/-0.89 mm(2) to 8.7+/-1.4 mm(2), P=0.04) and enhanced vein lumen recanalization (3.39+/-0.34% to 5.07+/-0.57%, P=0.02). Treatment with ad.VEGF enhanced thrombus recanalization and resolution, probably as a consequence of an increase in macrophage recruitment.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 07/2008; 28(10):1753-9. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine whether mobile phones and mobile phone locating devices are associated with improved ambulance response times in central London. All calls from the London Ambulance Service database since 1999 were analysed. In addition, 100 consecutive patients completed a questionnaire on mobile phone use whilst attending the St Thomas's Hospital Emergency Department in central London. Mobile phone use for emergencies in central London has increased from 4007 (5% of total) calls in January 1999 to 21,585 (29%) in August 2004. Ambulance response times for mobile phone calls were reduced after the introduction of the mobile phone locating system (mean 469 s versus 444 s; P = 0.0195). The proportion of mobile phone calls made from mobile phones for life-threatening emergencies was higher after injury than for medical emergencies (41% versus 16%, P = 0.0063). Of patients transported to the accident and emergency department by ambulance, 44% contacted the ambulance service by mobile phone. Three-quarters of calls made from outside the home or work-place were by mobile phone and 72% of patients indicated that it would have taken longer to contact the emergency services if they had not used a mobile. Since the introduction of the mobile phone locating system, there has been an improvement in ambulance response times. Mobile locating systems in urban areas across the UK may lead to faster response times and, potentially, improved patient outcomes.
    Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England 04/2008; 90(2):113-6. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    James A Gossage, Alex Cho, Philip C H Ng
    Annals of The Royal College of Surgeons of England 08/2007; 89(5):530. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Clinical Practice 07/2007; 61(6):1047-9. · 2.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate a single unit's experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for treating locally advanced non-metastatic initially resectable and unresectable oesophago-gastric cancer. The medical records of all patients with either locally advanced carcinoma of the lower oesophagus or cardia treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy between August 1999 and January 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-four patients with initially resectable tumours (T2-3 or N+) and 38 patients with initially unresectable tumours (T4 or M1a) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (83% combination Epirubicin, Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil). Symptomatic grade III/IV toxicity was observed in 33% of patients. Chemotherapy was not completed in 20 patients because of death (5.9%) and inadequate tumour response/toxicity (13.7%). Forty-three patients (67.3%) with initially resectable tumours and 19 patients (50%) with initially unresectable tumours underwent surgery. Chemotherapy in this study was associated with appreciable toxicity. Patients with initially unresectable locally advanced disease can be downstaged with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
    European Journal of Surgical Oncology 01/2007; 32(10):1114-8. · 2.61 Impact Factor