Fahad Al Mohareb

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Ar Riyāḑ, Ar Riyāḑ, Saudi Arabia

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Publications (8)11.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background and objectives There is limited information regarding the outcome of patients treated for leukemia during pregnancy. This study was performed on all cases of leukemia during pregnancy identified in our institution leukemia database. Patients and methods It is a retrospective study from our existing database. Thirty two cases were identified among the cohort of patients treated for acute and chronic leukemia between January 1991 and July 2003. Results Among the acute leukemia patients (n = 21), 10 patients (47.6%) received chemotherapy during pregnancy, seven had live birth and three had spontaneous abortion. No teratogenicity or congenital malformations or postnatal complication were reported. The remaining 11 (52.4%) were not given chemotherapy while pregnant; three patients presented after 34 weeks of gestation ending in normal live births and then received chemotherapy and eight patients had abortion before starting chemotherapy. Among the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients (n = 11), nine patients received hydroxyurea, one patient received alfa-interferon and one patient was treated with leukepheresis. Eight patients had normal live births and three patients had abortion. Out of the 32 patients, 18 patients (56.2%) subsequently underwent HLA matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation, seven for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), two for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and nine for CML. After a median follow up of 16 years, five patients (15.6%) are alive in remission (one from chemotherapy group and four from SCT group). Conclusions Our report lends credence to the safety and feasibility of administering anti-leukemic therapy in acute and chronic leukemias during pregnancy although acute leukemia patients had possibly a poor long term outcome compared to non-pregnant patients.
    Hematology/ Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is a significant postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant problem. Recent data in lung transplant patients suggest an association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We studied posthematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its response to a proton pump inhibitor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were studied. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was assessed by 24-hour pH monitoring with a Bravo catheter-free radio pH capsule. Patients with positive gastroesophageal reflux disease were started on omeprazole. Pretreatment and posttreatment pulmonary function tests were done at 3-month intervals. RESULTS: Of 7 patients, 5 had positive results for gastroesophageal reflux disease (71%). Omeprazole had a disease-stabilizing effect on the patients' pulmonary function tests. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows a significant association between bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Use of omeprazole may have a disease-stabilizing effect in short-term follow-up.
    Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. 03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Limited data exist on allogeneic transplant outcomes in recipients receiving hematopoietic cells from donors with prior or current hepatitis B (HBV) or C virus (HCV) infection (seropositive donors), or for recipients with prior or current HBV or HCV infection (seropositive recipients). Transplant outcomes are reported for 416 recipients from 121 centers, who received a human leukocyte antigen-identical related-donor allogeneic transplant for hematologic malignancies between 1995 and 2003. Of these, 33 seronegative recipients received grafts from seropositive donors and 128 recipients were seropositive. The remaining 256 patients served as controls. With comparable median follow-up (cases, 5.9 years; controls, 6.7 years), the incidence of treatment-related mortality, survival, graft-versus-host disease, and hepatic toxicity, appears similar in all cohorts. The frequencies of hepatic toxicities as well as causes of death between cases and controls were similar. Prior exposure to HBV or HCV in either the donor or the recipient should not be considered an absolute contraindication to transplant.
    Transplant Infectious Disease 05/2012; 14(5):468-78. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • Hematology/ Oncology and Stem Cell Therapy 01/2012; 5(3):169-70.
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    ABSTRACT: Several centers are now performing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO) but the availability is still limited due to high cost and the need for multi-disciplinary team and an advanced laboratory support. Special issues including compatible donor availability, potential for alternate donor programs, differences in pattern of disease, pre-HSCT general status particularly for patients with BM failure, high sero-positivity for CMV, Hepatitis B and C infection and specific observations about GVHD with its relation to genetically homogeneous community are discussed. A total of 17 HSCT programs (performing five or more HSCTs annually) exist in nine countries of the EM region. Only six programs are currently reporting to EBMT or IBMTR. A total of 7617 HSCTs including 5701 allogeneic HSCTs have been performed. Due to low HSCT team density (1.5583 teams/10 million inhabitants versus 14.4333 in Europe) and very low HSCT team distribution (0.2729 teams/10,000 sq km area versus <1 to 6 teams in Europe) only 70.8% of total population has access to such a program in EM region. GNI/capita had no clear association with low HSCT activity; however improvement in infrastructure and establishment of EM regional HSCT registry need prioritization.
    Transfusion and Apheresis Science 04/2010; 42(2):169-75. · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response and resistance of cases to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy with tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors (imatinib mesylate) and to search for mutations in the breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) kinase domain prior to and during therapy. Molecular response was assessed with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and was expressed as the ratio between BCR-ABL and ABL (k562 cell line) x 100. In addition, we searched for mutations in BCR-ABL kinase domain by amplification and direct sequencing of cDNA products of archived RNA samples. There were 85 cases of CML Philadelphia-chromosome-positive patients. Major molecular response [corrected] (MMR) of 0.05% was achieved in 40 (47%) of 85 patients and 3-log reduction was achieved in 37 (44%) after 6 months of imatinib therapy. When molecular monitoring was extended to 12 months in a subset of delayed responsive cases (17 cases) who did not achieve an MMR at 6 months, significant changes in BCR-ABL/ABL ratio were noticed. Fifteen de novo CML patients were started directly on treatment and were monitored for BCR-ABL/ABL ratio for a further period of up to 24 months. Their median of BCR-ABL/ABL ratio was 18% at diagnosis, 0.3% after 6 months, 0.2% after 12 months, and 0.01% after 18 and 24 months. Four (27%) of 15 patients achieved MMR as 3-log reduction after 6 months, 6 (40%) after 12 months, 9 (60%) after 18 months, and 7 (46%) after 24 months. No mutation(s) or polymorphism(s) were detected in all tested patients at diagnosis, at 6 months following imatinib and following 12 months for patients showing delayed response. BCR-ABL mutations are rare in early chronic phase and increases with CML disease progression. Therefore, search for other causes in resistant cases at this phase should be sought.
    Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers 11/2009; 14(1):67-74. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the antitumor immune function of gammadelta T cells and to scan the granzyme B gene for the known single nucleotide polymorphism in breast cancer patients and normal controls. Levels, cytotoxicity, and functional capacity of gammadelta T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assessed by flow cytometry, (51)Cr release, and ELISpot assays, respectively. Furthermore, sequence based typing was adopted to screen for granzyme B gene polymorphism. We have found that the frequency and function of gammadelta T cells are reduced both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 30 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (2 [1.2, 3]), compared with 38 normal controls (3.2 [2.5, 5.7]) (p=0.02). In addition, resting gammadelta T cells from breast cancer patients produced significantly more interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha than normal controls. Moreover, ex vivo stimulation of gammadelta T cells with zoledronic acid and interleukin-2 compensated in part for this deficiency, as it stimulated the proliferation, cytokine production, and enhanced the expression of messenger RNA of granzyme B. Interestingly, when the known granzyme B gene polymorphism was screened, we found the prevalence of the mutated genotype RAH/RAH to be significantly (p<0.017) associated with breast cancer patients (14.30%) compared with normal donors (1.40%). Cytotoxicity exerted by gammadelta T cells on Daudi and MCF-7 was significantly higher in donors with the wild-type QPY/QPY (50%) compared with donors with RAH/RAH (21%). Our data suggest that reduction in the proportion of gammadelta T cells and granzyme B gene polymorphism leads to defective immune function in breast cancer patients. Treatment with zoledronic acid amend partially this fault. Further studies of gammadelta T cells function and granzyme B gene polymorphism in cancers, as well as the potential therapeutic use of zoledronic acid are warranted.
    Experimental hematology 06/2009; 37(7):838-48. · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) result from genetic and environmental factors. We present patients who had no history of atopic disorders before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and who seem to have acquired VKC or AKC from their donors, who had atopic disorders. Observational case series. The patients in this study were part of a cohort of patients who had undergone allogeneic hemapoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from January 1997 through December 2007. Of 621 HSCT recipients, four recipients who were free of allergic disorders acquired VKC or AKC from their afflicted donors after HSCT. Each patient underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, determination of the total serum immunoglobulin (Ig) E, and conjunctival scrapings. Four (0.64%) of 621 patients who had undergone HSCT acquired VKC or AKC after BMT. The donors had VKC or atopic dermatitis. In addition, in two of these four patients, asthma developed. One patient had elevated total serum IgE. Conjunctival scrapings of all four patients revealed the presence of eosinophils. One patient had concurrent graft-versus-host disease. VKC and AKC are systemic allergic disorders characterized by local ocular manifestations. This report suggests the possibility of the acquisition of VKC or AKC after BMT by adoptive transfer.
    American Journal of Ophthalmology 08/2008; 146(3):462-5. · 4.02 Impact Factor