Claudia Rossi

Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Piedmont, Italy

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Publications (6)4.31 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The past two decades have seen a progressive improvement in the survival rates of preterm infants, especially in neonates <30 weeks of gestational age. These neonates constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the definition of their optimal postnatal growth pattern is still controversial. Concerns have also been raised about the strategies to monitor their growth, specifically in relation to the charts used. At present the available charts in clinical practice are fetal growth charts, neonatal anthropometric charts and postnatal growth charts for term infants. None of these, for different reasons, is suitable to correctly evaluate preterm infant growth. An international multicentric project has recently started a study aiming at building a prescriptive standard for the evaluation of postnatal growth of preterm infants and it will be available in the next years providing a population that is conceptually as close as possible to the prescriptive approach used for the construction of the WHO infant and child growth standards. At present, while an international longitudinal standard for evaluating preterm infant postnatal growth is lacking, in Italy the best compromise in clinical practice is likely to be as follows: new Italian INeS (Italian Neonatal Study) charts up to term; International longitudinal charts WHO 2006 or CDC 2002 from term to two years; finally the Italian Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes (SIEDP) 2006 growth charts could be suitable for monitoring the growth of these infants from two years up to 20 years of age.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 07/2011; 24 Suppl 2:9-11. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It's well known that VLBWI fail to thrive, however it's still unclear how gender, GA and morbidities affect growth pattern: aim of this study is to assess the influence of these factors on weight growth. 262 VLBWI were selected. Weight was recorded daily up to 28 days, weekly up to discharge and during 7 scheduled follow-up visits up to 2 years of corrected age. Individual profiles were fitted with a mathematical function suitable to model selected growth milestones and mean distance and velocity curves were drawn. Effects of gender, GA, major-morbidities, nutritional and respiratory support on individual weight growth milestones were estimated using a multivariate linear model. Each of these variables acts differently on weight growth pattern mainly modifying velocity curves characteristics. In particular, infants with major morbidities weight growth impairment-seen on distance curves at 2 years of corrected age-depends on poor weight velocity during a critical period ending within 4th month of postnatal age, for SGA or BPD infants, starting from 5th month of postnatal for severely neurologically impaired infants. These critical periods could be the most appropriate to identify risk factors for weight growth impairment in VLBWI.
    Early human development 03/2009; 85(6):339-47. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants' survival has greatly increased in the last few decades thanks to the improvement in obstetrical and neonatal care. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the definitions of their optimal nutrition and postnatal growth pattern are still controversial. It is known that VLBW infants have a specific postnatal growth pattern markedly different from that of higher birthweight full-term infants. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to trace VLBW infants growth charts for weight, length and head circumference. These charts will be a useful tool to monitor postnatal growth of VLBW infants both during hospitalisation and after discharge, up to 2 or 3 years of age. A useful tool in VLBW infants growth evaluation could also be absolute velocity charts that, allowing a better and earlier identification of growth anomalies, could permit the observation of phenomena not yet visible on distance charts. Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants' survival has greatly increased in the last few decades thanks to the improvement in obstetrical and neonatal care. These neonates represent about 1-1.5% of all live born infants in developed countries (1) and they constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). For this reason, the correct evaluation of their postnatal growth is of primary concern nowadays although the definitions of optimal nutrition and postnatal growth pattern are still controversial.
    Pediatric endocrinology reviews: PER 10/2008; 6(1):9-13.
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    ABSTRACT: Since aminoglycoside efficacy is proportional to serum peak/MIC ratio and linked to post antibiotic effect, use of netilmicin once rather than twice a day has been proposed. On the other hand netilmicin might play a role in drug-induced nephrotoxicity, mainly on proximal tubule. Urinary retinol binding protein (RBP) and alpha1 microglobulin (alpha1m) are early and specific indicators of tubular damage and dysfunction. 21 preterm neonates (GA < 37 weeks) were divided in two groups on the basis of netilmicin administration modality (1: once a day, 2: twice a day, both for 7 days, at 5 mg/kg/die) and differences in netilmicin tolerability were assessed by evaluation of alpha1m and RBP levels by immunonephelometric method. No significant differences were found between the two groups either considering levels at time 1 and at time 2, or considering the difference between time 1 and 2 (Delta1/2). In our study once-daily dosing schedule shows similar low rates of nephrotoxicity, compared with multiple daily dosing schedule: this result may support the general adoption of once-daily dosing of netilmicin in clinical practice.
    Journal of chemotherapy (Florence, Italy) 07/2008; 20(3):324-6. · 0.83 Impact Factor
  • Early Human Development - EARLY HUM DEV. 01/2008; 84.
  • The Journal of nuclear medicine and allied sciences 34(4 Suppl):281-4.