He Li

Beijing Normal University, Beijing, Beijing Shi, China

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Publications (14)59.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: With a longer life expectancy and an increased prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, investigations on trajectories of cognitive aging have become exciting and promising. This study aimed to estimate the patterns of age-related cognitive decline and the potential associated factors of cognitive function in community-dwelling residents of Beijing, China. In this study, 1248 older adults aged 52-88 years [including 175 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects] completed a battery of neuropsychological scales. The personal information, including demographic information, medical history, eating habits, lifestyle regularity and leisure activities, was also collected. All cognitive function exhibited an agerelated decline in normal volunteers. Piece-wise linear fitting results suggested that performance on the Auditory Verbal Learning Test remained stable until 58 years of age and continued to decline thereafter. The decline in processing speed and executive function began during the early 50's. Scores on visual-spatial and language tests declined after 66 years of age. The decline stage of the general mental status ranged from 63 to 70 years of age. However, the MCI group did not exhibit an obvious age-related decline in most cognitive tests. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that education, gender, leisure activities, diabetes and eating habits were associated with cognitive abilities. These results indicated various trajectories of age-related decline across multiple cognitive domains. We also found different patterns of agerelated cognitive decline between MCI and normal elderly. These findings could help improve the guidance of cognitive intervention program and have implications for public policy issues.
    Current Alzheimer Research 01/2014; 11(8):806-16. · 3.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The seven-factor biopsychosocial model of personality distinguished four biologically based temperaments and three psychosocially based characters. Previous studies have suggested that the four temperaments-Novelty Seeking (NS), Reward Dependence (RD), Harm Avoidance (HA), and Persistence (P)-have their respective neurobiological correlates, especially in the striatum-connected subcortical and cortical networks. However, few studies have investigated their neurobiological basis in the form of fiber connectivity between brain regions. This study correlated temperaments with fiber connectivity between the striatum and subcortical and cortical hub regions in a sample of 50 Chinese adult males. Generally consistent with our hypotheses, results showed that: (1) NS was positively correlated with fiber connectivity from the medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC, lOFC) and amygdala to the striatum; (2) RD was positively correlated with fiber connectivity from the mOFC, posterior cingulate cortex/retrosplenial cortex (PCC), hippocampus, and amygdala to the striatum; (3) HA was positively linked to fiber connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and PCC to the striatum; and (4) P was positively linked to fiber connectivity from the mOFC to the striatum. These results extended the research on the neurobiological basis of temperaments by identifying their anatomical fiber connectivity correlates within the subcortical-cortical neural networks.
    NeuroImage 04/2013; · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is recognized as the prodromal phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence showed that patients with multiple-domain (MD) aMCI were at higher risk of converting to dementia and exhibited more severe gray matter atrophy than single-domain (SD) aMCI. The investigation of the microstructural abnormalities of white matter (WM) among different subtypes of aMCI and their relations with cognitive performances can help to understand the variations among aMCI subtypes and to construct potential imaging based biomarkers to monitor the progression of aMCI. Diffusion-weighted MRI data were acquired from 40 patients with aMCI (aMCI-SD: n = 19; aMCI-MD: n = 21) and 37 healthy controls (HC). Voxel-wise and atlas-based analyses of whole-brain WM were performed among three groups. The correlations between the altered diffusion metrics of the WM tracts and the neuropsychological scores in each subtype of aMCI were assessed. The aMCI-MD patients showed disrupted integrity in multiple WM tracts across the whole-brain when compared with HCs or with aMCI-SD. In contrast, only few WM regions with diffusion changes were found in aMCI-SD as compared to HCs and with less significance. For neuropsychological correlations, only aMCI-MD patients exhibited significant associations between disrupted WM connectivity (in the body of the corpus callosum and the right anterior internal capsules) and cognitive impairments (MMSE and Digit Symb-Coding scores), whereas no such correlations were found in aMCI-SD. These findings indicate that the degeneration extensively exists in WM tracts in aMCI-MD that precedes the development of AD, whereas underlying WM pathology in aMCI-SD is imperceptible. The results are consistent with the view that aMCI is not a uniform disease entity and presents heterogeneity in the clinical progression.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 04/2013; · 4.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:To investigate the topologic reorganization of the default-mode network (DMN) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and whether, relative to healthy control subjects, patients with MCI would be more likely to show disrupted functional connectivity and altered topological configuration of the DMN during the memory task compared with that observed during the resting state.Materials and Methods:This study was approved by the institutional review board of Beijing Normal University Imaging Center for Brain Research. Written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Healthy control subjects (n = 26) and patients with amnestic MCI (aMCI) (n = 25) performed an episodic memory task and also rested while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Task-induced deactivations were identified and parcellated into different regions associated with the DMN. Functional connectivity across all pairs of regions was computed to construct the DMN architecture. Graph theoretical approaches were used to characterize topological properties of this network.Results:Patients with aMCI showed similar deactivation in the DMN to that observed in healthy control subjects (P > .05) but showed significantly decreased anterior-to-posterior functional connectivity only during the task (P < .05). Significant increases in local efficiency (P < .05), but not in global efficiency (P > .05), were observed in aMCI only during the task. Decreased functional connectivity was predictive of increased local efficiency (r = -0.35, P = .015). Significant correlations between these network measures and cognitive performance (P < .05) indicated their potential use as early markers to assess the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD).Conclusion:This study suggests the early onset functional reorganization of the DMN toward a nonoptimized regularity configuration in aMCI and expands the understanding of dynamic functional reorganization in brain networks along the continuum from normal aging to AD dementia.© RSNA, 2013Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13121573/-/DC1.
    Radiology 03/2013; · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate the topological alterations of whole-brain white matter structural connectivity in patients with different types of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), including single-domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) aMCI, and to explore the relationship of such connectivity with neuropsychologic performance. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board of Imaging Center for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University. Written informed consent was obtained from each participant. The present study involved 38 patients with aMCI (SD aMCI, n = 18; MD aMCI, n = 20) and 36 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. White-matter connectional architecture in each participant was depicted with diffusion-weighted MR imaging and represented in terms of a connectivity matrix by using a deterministic tractography method. Graph theory-based analyses were then performed to characterize brain network properties. Results: The global topological organization of white matter networks was significantly disrupted in patients with MD aMCI (P < .01 for all) but not in those with SD aMCI, as compared with control subjects. Connectivity impairment in patients with MD aMCI was found in the temporal, frontal, and parietal cortices (P < .05, corrected). MD aMCI had decreased network efficiency relative to SD aMCI (P = .016), with the most pronounced differences located in the frontal cortex (P < .01 for all). Strong associations between cognitive impairments and disrupted topological features (global, P < .05; regional, P < .002) were identified in patients with aMCI. Conclusion: The present study suggests early onset disruption of whole-brain white matter connectivity in patients with aMCI, especially in those with the MD subtype, supporting the view that MD aMCI is a more advanced form of disease than is SD aMCI. Moreover, cognitive correlations with topological network properties suggest their potential use as markers to assess the risk of Alzheimer disease. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112361/-/DC1.
    Radiology 09/2012; 265(2):518-27. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous case-control and family-based association studies have implicated the SLC6A4 gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Little research, however, has examined this gene's role in obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in community samples. The present study genotyped seven tag SNPs and two common functional tandem repeat polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and STin2), which together cover the whole SLC6A4 gene, and investigated their associations with OCS in normal Chinese college students (N = 572). The results revealed a significant gender main effect and gender-specific genetic effects of the SLC6A4 gene on OCS. Males scored significantly higher on total OCS and its three dimensions than did females (ps < .01). The 5-HTTLPR in the promoter region showed a female-specific genetic effect, with the l/l and l/s genotypes linked to higher OCS scores than the s/s genotype (ps < .05). In contrast, a conserved haplotype polymorphism (rs1042173| rs4325622| rs3794808| rs140701| rs4583306| rs2020942) covering from intron 3 to the 3' UTR of the SLC6A4 gene showed male-specific genetic effects, with the CGAAGG/CGAAGG genotype associated with lower OCS scores than the other genotypes (ps < .05). These effects remained significant after controlling for OCS-related factors including participants' depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as stressful life events, and correction for multiple tests. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for our understanding of the sex-specific role of the different sections of the SLC6A4 gene in OCD.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 06/2012; 46(9):1153-60. · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Response inhibition refers to the suppression of inappropriate or irrelevant responses. It has a central role in executive functions, and has been linked to a wide spectrum of prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders. Increasing evidence from neuropharmacological studies has suggested that gene variants in the norepinephrine neurotransmission system make specific contributions to response inhibition. This study genotyped five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering the whole alpha-2B-adrenergic receptor (ADRA2B) gene and investigated their associations with response inhibition in a relatively large healthy Chinese sample (N=421). The results revealed significant genetic effects of the ADRA2B conserved haplotype polymorphisms on response inhibition as measured by stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) (F(2, 418)=5.938, p=0.003). Individuals with the AAGG/AAGG genotype (n=89; mean SSRT=170.2 ms) had significantly shorter SSRTs than did those with either the CCAC/AAGG genotype (n=216; mean SSRT=182.4 ms; uncorrected p=0.03; corrected p=0.09) or the CCAC/CCAC genotype (n=116; mean SSRT=195.8 ms; corrected p<0.002, Cohen's d=0.51). This finding provides the first evidence from association research in support of a critical role of the norepinephrine neurotransmission system in response inhibition. A better understanding of the genetic basis of response inhibition would allow us to develop more effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of deficient or underdeveloped response inhibition as well as its related prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 01/2012; 37(5):1115-21. · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research has shown inconsistent findings regarding the relations between the functional Val158Met polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene and individual differences in personality traits. This study attempts to overcome some of the weaknesses of previous research, namely, small sample sizes, clinical samples, ethnic stratification, wide age ranges, neglecting sex differences, and single measures of personality traits. A large sample (n = 556, 250 male, 306 female) of healthy Chinese college students (mean age = 20.5 ± 1 years) was given a battery of personality scales, including the temperament and character inventory-revised, the behavioral inhibition system and behavioral approach system scale, the Beck depression inventory, and the Beck anxiety inventory. Factor analysis of the affect-related personality traits revealed two factors that corresponded to positive (PEM) and negative emotionality (NEM). We found a consistent COMT-by-sex interaction effect on affect-related personality traits. Compared with males with Met/Met alleles, males with Val/Val alleles showed significantly higher scores on NEM, but lower scores on PEM. Females, however, showed an opposite but nonsignificant pattern. Our results supported the role of the COMT gene in personality traits for males and contributed to the growing literature on sex differences in gene-behavior connections.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 04/2011; 36(8):1593-8. · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional stage between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent functional imaging studies have demonstrated regional deactivation magnitudes changes of default-mode network (DMN) in patients, accompanied by a defect of memory function. However, functional connectivity in the DMN during task performance was rarely investigated. METHODS : 26 amnestic MCI and 27 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during an episodic memory task. Resting-state fMRI data were also collected. The changes in default-mode networks under both task-related and resting-state fMRI were obtained with a temporal correlation analysis. RESULTS: Significantly decreased functional connectivity was found mainly in anterior-posterior connectivity of DMN in aMCI groups. And a correlation existed between the anterior-posterior functional connectivity and MMSE scores. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that disconnectivity of DMN could be used as an imaging biomarker for predicting the future cognitive decline of aMCI patients.
    4th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, BMEI 2011, Shanghai, China, October 15-17, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Recent molecular genetics studies showed significant associations between dopamine-related genes (including genes for dopamine receptors, transporters, and degradation) and working memory, but little is known about the role of genes for dopamine modulation, such as those related to neurotensin (NT), in working memory. A recent animal study has suggested that NT antagonist administration impaired working memory in a learning task. The current study examined associations between NT genes and working memory among humans. Four hundred and sixty healthy undergraduate students were assessed with a 2-back working memory paradigm. 5 SNPs in the NTSR1 gene were genotyped. 5 ANOVA tests were conducted to examine whether and how working memory differed by NTSR1 genotype, with each SNP variant as the independent variable and the average accuracy on the working memory task as the dependent variable. ANOVA results suggested that two SNPs in the NTSR1 gene (rs4334545 and rs6090453) were significantly associated with working memory. These results survived corrections for multiple comparisons. Our results demonstrated that NTSR1 SNP polymorphisms were significantly associated with variance in working memory performance among healthy adults. This result extended previous rodent studies showing that the NT deficiency impairs the working memory function. Future research should replicate our findings and extend to an examination of other dopamine modulators.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(3):e17365. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Risky decision making is a complex process that involves weighing the probabilities of alternative options that can be desirable, undesirable, or neutral. Individuals vary greatly in how they make decisions either under ambiguity and/or under risk. Such individual differences may have genetic bases. Based on previous studies on the genetic basis of decision making, two decision making tasks [i.e., the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and Loss Aversion Task (LAT)] were used to test the effect of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on decision making under ambiguity and under risk in a large Han Chinese sample (572 college students, 312 females). Basic intelligence and memory tests were also included to control for the influence of basic cognitive abilities on decision making. We found that 5-HTTLPR polymorphism significantly influenced performance in both IGT and LAT. After controlling for intelligence and memory abilities, subjects homozygous for s allele had lower IGT scores than l carriers in the first 40 trials of the IGT task. They also exhibited higher loss aversion than l carriers in the LAT task. Moreover, the effects of 5-HTTLPR were stronger for males than for females. These results extend the literature on the important role of emotion in decision making under ambiguity and risk, and shed additional lights on how decision making is influenced by culture as well as sex differences. Combining our results with existing literature, we propose that these effects might be mediated by a neural circuitry that comprises the amygdala, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and insular cortex. Understanding the genetic factors affecting decision making in healthy subjects may allow us to better identify at-risk individuals, and better target the development of new potential treatments for specific disorders such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression.
    Neuropharmacology 11/2010; 59(6):518-26. · 4.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This research investigated the cognitive correlates of false memories that are induced by the misinformation paradigm. A large sample of Chinese college students (N=436) participated in a misinformation procedure and also took a battery of cognitive tests. Results revealed sizable and systematic individual differences in false memory arising from exposure to misinformation. False memories were significantly and negatively correlated with measures of intelligence (measured with Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), perception (Motor-Free Visual Perception Test, Change Blindness, and Tone Discrimination), memory (Wechsler Memory Scales and 2-back Working Memory tasks), and face judgement (Face Recognition and Facial Expression Recognition). These findings suggest that people with relatively low intelligence and poor perceptual abilities might be more susceptible to the misinformation effect.
    Memory 07/2010; 18(5):543-55. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This research investigated the associations among personality characteristics, cognitive abilities, and false memory induced by misinformation. Chinese college students (N = 436) participated in a misinformation study and received a battery of cognitive tasks and personality measures. Results showed that false memory was positively related to persistence, self-directedness, and active coping, but negatively related to depression, fear of negative evaluation, novelty seeking, negative coping, and cognitive abilities. Importantly, significant interaction effects were found between personality factors and cognitive abilities. Individuals with particular combinations of personality characteristics and cognitive abilities (i.e., low fear of negative evaluation, low harm avoidance, high cooperativeness, high reward dependence, and high self-directedness in combination with relatively low cognitive abilities) were more vulnerable to the misinformation effect.
    Personality and Individual Differences. 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Behavioral and neuroimaging evidence shows that bilinguals experience interference and competition during bilingual processing. The neural basis of bilingual language control is not well understood. Using mixed blocked and event-related design, the present study explored the sustained and transient activations during bilingual control. 15 Chinese-English bilingual speakers were scanned when they performed language switching tasks. The results showed that, compared to single language condition, the mixed language condition (sustained control) induced the activation in the bilateral prefrontal (BA6BA8BA10), middle frontal (BA4546) and parietal lobes (BA7 BA40BA49); In contrast, relative to the no switch condition, language switching (transient control) activated the left superior, inferior parietal lobe (BA2 BA40) and middle frontal (BA1146). These results suggested that sustained and transient language control induced differential lateral activation patterns.
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 06/2008; 123(5):3890. · 1.65 Impact Factor