Yi-Peng Chen

Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 臺南市, Taiwan, Taiwan

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Publications (5)9.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Gold particles have been used in complementary medicine for decades, and many beneficial effects have been reported. Our present study sought to evaluate the therapeutic effects of nanogold in carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄)-injured liver of rats. Male SD rats were subjected to liver injury induction by CCl₄, then the rats were fed with zero to high dose (0, 1, 5 or 10 ppm) of nanogold water every day for 4 weeks. Biochemical analyses on liver functions were then performed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of nanogold. Our results revealed that gold nanoparticles lowered serum aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase and exerted serum total protein-recovering effects, which might be partially associated with the elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 level. In addition, serum triglyceride level fell after continuous ingestion of nanogold. Finally, the experimental animals recovered body weight after 4 weeks of nanogold ingestion. This is the first report indicating inflammationalleviating effects of nanogold on hepatic injury.
    The Chinese journal of physiology 10/2012; 55(5):331-6. · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the active ingredient of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) responsible for its anti-inflammatory effects and the relevant molecular mechanisms. Five major antcins (A, B, C, H, and K) were isolated from fruiting bodies of Niuchangchih. Structural similarity between the antcins and 2 glucocorticoids (cortisone and dexamethasone) was compared. After incubation with each compound, the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was examined for its migration into the nucleus. Mo lecular docking was performed to model the tertiary structure of GR associated with antcins. Incubation with cortisone, dexamethasone or antcin A (but not antcins B, C, H, and K) led to the migration of glucocorticoid receptor into the nucleus. The minimal concentration of antcin A, cortisone and dexamethasone to induce nuclear migration of glucocorticoid receptor was 10, 1, and 0.1 mol/L, respectively. The results are in agreement with the simulated binding affinity scores of these three ligands docking to the glucocorticoid receptor. Molecular modeling indicates that C-7 of antcin A or glucocorticoids is exposed to a hydrophobic region in the binding cavity of the glucocorticoid receptor, and the attachment of a hydrophilic group to C-7 of the other four antcins presumably results in their being expelled when docking to the cavity. The anti-inflammatory effect of Niuchangchih is, at least, partly attributed to antcin A that mimics glucocorticoids and triggers translocation of glucocorticoid receptor into nucleus to initiate the suppressing inflammation.
    Acta Pharmacologica Sinica 05/2011; 32(7):904-11. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been reported that medicinal mushrooms might induce different types of immune responses. Anthodia camphorata (A. camphorata) has attracted much attention for its therapeutic effects in treating hepatoma. We tested this anti-tumor effects using immunomodulation of macrophages and extracts of A. camphorata. We evaluated the anti-proliferation effects of various extracts of A. camphorata from fruiting bodies (AC-FB), mycelium of solid-state cultures (AC-SS), liquid-state cultures (AC-LS) and polyaccharide extracts from liquid-state cultures (AC-PS), and extracts of A. camphorata stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cell-conditioned mediums (MC-CMs). We measured cell proliferation and, did migration assays by cell cycle analysis and by observing apoptosis-related proteins (AKT, PARP-1, and NF-κB) and the mRNA expression of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) of macrophages in human hepatoma cell lines. Our results revealed that two of the extracts (AC-FB and AC-SS) had better anti-proliferation effects, implying an immunomodulatory role the macrophages might play. This outcome is consistent with findings that AC-FB and AC-SS increase mRNA expression of TNF-α and the corresponding expression of apoptosis-related proteins on activation of MC-CMs, while A. camphorata polysaccharides induce macrophage-derived anti-tumor activities in human hepatoma cells via IL-1β and Akt activation. These results indicate that anti-tumor effects exerted by modulation of macrophage activation of A. camphorate may be influenced by the other constituents which (contained little or no polysaccharide) of A. camphorata.
    Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry 05/2011; 75(4):624-32. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antrodia camphorata, unique fungal specie, has been used as a folk medicine in Taiwan for many years. The purpose of this study was to compare the extracts from the solid-state culture of A. camphorata co-fermented with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF) with two other extracts from fruiting bodies (AC-FB) or solid-state culture (AC-SS), for their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We measured in vitro cell proliferation, percentage of apoptosis, population distribution of cell cycles, Western blot analysis of multiple drugs resistance-1 (MDR-1), and apoptosis-related proteins in HepG2 cells treated with three different preparations of A. camphorate extracts. Our results showed that AC-CF had better anti-proliferation effect on human hepatoma HepG2 cells than AC-FB or AC-SS dose-dependently. In addition, AC-CF in combination with anti-tumor agents (mitomycin C or methotrexate) showed better adjuvant anti-tumor effects than AC-FB or AC-SS. We further demonstrated the augmented adjuvant anti-tumor effects of AC-CF not only through down regulation of MDR-1 expression but also through a COX-2 dependent apoptosis pathway, involving down-regulation of COX-2 and p-AKT and up-regulation of PARP-1. In conclusion, in this study, we have demonstrated a novel strategy of fermenting A. camphorata with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF), which augmented their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells as compared to the traditional ones (AC-FB or AC-SS).
    The American Journal of Chinese Medicine 02/2009; 37(4):771-83. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to investigate the adjuvant anti-tumor effects of Antrodia camphorate in human hepatoma cells (C3A and PLC/PRF/5) which are resistance to most anti-tumor agents, elucidate the possible regulation pathways, and measure the tumor growth and survival rate in xenograft-nude mice after combined with anti-tumor agents. The AC extracts were measured by using a phenol/sulfuric acid method as previously described. The in vitro cell proliferation assay of ACs and anti-tumor agents was tested on C3A and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines. The percentage of human hepatoma cells undergoing apoptosis and distributing in different phases of cell cycle were determined by Flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis for MDR-1 and apoptosis- related proteins. The measurements of tumor growth and survival analysis of hepatoma implanted nude mice treated with Antrodia camphorata extracts and anti-tumor agents alone or in combinations. We have found that Antrodia camphorata extracts, when combined with anti-tumor agents, showed adjuvant antiproliferative effects on hepatoma cells (in vitro) and on xenografted cells in tumor-implanted nude mice (in vivo), which then extended their median survival days. Furthermore, solid-state extracts of Antrodia camphorata (AC-SS) showed its adjuvant effects through the inhibition of MDR gene expressions and the pathway of COX-2- dependent inhibition of p-AKT, which ultimately resulted in the induction of apoptosis in hepatoma cells. In this study, we have found that Antrodia camphorata extract, when combined with anti-tumor agents, showed adjuvant antiproliferative effects on hepatoma cells (in vitro) and on xenografted cells in tumor-implanted nude mice (in vivo).
    Journal of Ethnopharmacology 06/2008; 118(3):387-95. · 2.76 Impact Factor