Sandrine Plouvier

French Institute of Health and Medical Research, Paris, Ile-de-France, France

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Publications (9)16.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Occupational biomechanical exposures are considered as risk factors for low back pain in the working population. It has also been suggested that their effects persist after retirement. Our objectives were to assess the role of past biomechanical occupational exposure on low back pain in early old age among male participants of the Gazel Cohort.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 09/2014; · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 08/2013; 55(8):859-861. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Physical occupational exposure is a risk factor for low back pain in workers but the long term effects of exposure remain unclear. As several countries consider increasing the retirement age, further information on this topic is relevant. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of low back pain among middle aged and aging individuals in the general French population according to physical occupational exposure and retirement status. The study population originated from the French national survey 'Enquête décennale santé 2002'. Low back pain for more than 30 days within the previous twelve months (LBP) was assessed using a French version of the Nordic questionnaire. Occupational exposure was self assessed. Subjects were classified as "exposed" if they were currently or had previously been exposed to handling of heavy loads and/or to tiring postures. The weighted prevalence of LBP was computed separately for men and women, for active (aged 45-59) and retiree (aged 55-74), according to 5-year age group and past/present occupational exposure. For active men, the prevalence of LBP was significantly higher in those currently or previously exposed (n = 1051) compared with those never exposed (n = 1183), respectively over 20% versus less than 11%. Among retired men, the prevalence of LBP tended towards equivalence with increasing age among those previously exposed (n = 748) and those unexposed (n = 599).Patterns were quite similar for women with a higher prevalence in exposed active women (n = 741) compared to unexposed (n = 1260): around 25% versus 15%. Similarly, differences between previously exposed (n = 430) and unexposed (n = 489) retired women tended to reduce with age. The prevalence of LBP in active workers was associated with occupational exposure. The link with past exposure among retirees decreased with age. These results should be considered for policies dealing with prevention at the workplace and retirement.
    BMC Public Health 01/2011; 11:268. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low-back pain is a major public health concern because of its socioeconomic burden, especially for chronic forms. The purpose of this study was to analyse the associations between low-back pain and occupational and personal factors, with a special focus on interactions between age and occupational exposures. The study population comprised a sample of 3958 and 4526 working women and men aged 30 to 59 derived from a national health survey (2002-2003 EDS). Low-back pain was assessed using the French version of the Nordic questionnaire. Weight, height and smoking status were obtained through interview at home. Occupational exposures were self-assessed. The associations between low-back pain for more than 30 days in the previous year and occupational and personal factors were assessed using logistic models. An interaction between age and each occupational exposure was studied. In the multivariate models, age was the only personal factor significantly associated with low-back pain for both genders. The other personal factors studied were significantly associated with low-back pain for women only. Handling heavy loads and awkward postures at work were strongly associated with low-back pain for both genders (respectively OR=1.80 [1.46-2.23] and OR=1.65 [1.34-2.03] for men, and OR=1.65 [1.32-2.06] and OR=1.28 [1.04-1.59] for women). A high level of psychological demands at work and a low level of decision latitude were also associated with low-back pain for both genders (respectively OR=1.22 [1.03-1.46] and OR=1.32 [1.11-1.57] for men, and OR=1.31 [1.10-1.56] and OR=1.27 [1.06-1.51] for women). Only the interaction between age and awkward postures for men was borderline significant. This study showed strong associations between occupational exposures and persistent/recurrent low-back pain in a general working population in France. Targeting these exposures in prevention programs could be useful.
    Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 12/2010; 58(6):383-91. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the role that biomechanical strains and psychosocial work factors play in occupational class disparities in low-back pain in the GAZEL cohort. Recruited in 1989, the GAZEL cohort members were employees of the French national company in charge of energy who volunteered to enroll in an annual follow-up survey. The study population comprised 1487 men who completed questionnaires in 1996 (past occupational exposure to manual material handling, bending/twisting, and driving), 1997 (psychosocial work factors), and 2001 (low-back pain using a French version of the Nordic questionnaire for the assessment of low-back pain). Associations between low-back pain for >30 days in the preceding 12 months and social position at baseline (four categories) were described with a Cox model to determine prevalence ratios for each category. We compared adjusted and unadjusted ratios to quantify the contribution of occupational exposures. The prevalence of low-back pain for >30 days was 13.6%. The prevalence of low-back pain adjusted for age was significantly higher for blue-collar workers and clerks than for managers. The number of socioeconomic disparities observed was significantly reduced when biomechanical strains were taken into account; adjusting for psychosocial factors had little impact. In this population, occupational exposures--especially biomechanical strains--played an important role in occupational class disparities for persistent or recurrent low-back pain.
    Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health 10/2009; 35(6):429-36. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the pathways from level of education to low back pain (LBP) in the adult population, especially concerning the role of physical working constraints, and personal factors (overweight, tobacco consumption, and tallness). The study population consisted of 15,534 subjects from the National Health Survey, with data on LBP, level of education, personal factors, and physical working constraints. Logistic models for LBP (pain more than 30 days during the previous 12 months) were compared in order to check the consistency of the data with specific causal pathways. Low back pain was strongly associated with level of education. This association was almost completely explained if present or past exposure to tiring work postures and handling of heavy loads were taken into account. For men, the OR for "no diploma", adjusted only for age, was 1.75; it was 1.02 after additional adjustment on physical work factors. Personal factors played also a role, especially overweight for women. Among them, the OR associated with a body mass index = 27 or more was 1.58 after adjustment on all the other factors. In this national population the main pathways from education to LBP were through occupational exposure and lifestyle factors.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 11/2008; 82(5):643-52. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 09/2008; 56(5):280-280. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effects of duration of exposure to biomechanical strains on various types of low back pain (LBP). The population study was a random sample from the GAZEL cohort. Durations of exposure to selected biomechanical strains during subjects' working lifetime and potential confounders were assessed in 1996 by self-administered questionnaires. Data on LBP in the previous 12 months were collected in 2001. Relations between various dimensions of LBP and durations of exposure to the biomechanical strains were analysed with multivariate regression models. Polytomous models were built to determine whether some biomechanical strains were specifically associated with some types of LBP. Analyses were performed separately for men (n = 2218) and women (n = 383). Significant associations were observed (ORs reported are those for 20 years of exposure) between LBP and durations of driving and bending/twisting for men (OR 1.24 and 1.37 respectively); LBP for more than 30 days and duration of exposure to bending/twisting for men and women (OR 2.20 and 2.00 respectively) and duration of driving for women (OR 3.15); LBP radiating to the leg and duration of driving for men (OR 1.43) and bending/twisting for women (OR 1.95); LBP radiating below the knee and duration of exposure to pulling/pushing/carrying for men (OR 1.88). Bending/twisting in both men and women, and driving for women appeared to be stronger risk factors for LBP for more than 30 days. Pulling/pushing/carrying heavy loads appeared to be a risk factor specific for LBP radiating below the knee for men. This study suggests that exposure to biomechanical strains has long-term effects and a dose-response relation with duration of exposure and specific effects for some types of LBP.
    Occupational and environmental medicine 05/2008; 65(4):268-74. · 3.64 Impact Factor
  • Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2008; 56(5):281-281.