A C Donaldson

University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom

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Publications (4)9.51 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Compare the microbial profiles on the tongue dorsum in patients with halitosis and control subjects in a UK population using culture-independent techniques. Halitosis patients were screened according to our recently developed recruitment protocol. Scrapings from the tongue dorsum were obtained for 12 control subjects and 20 halitosis patients. Bacteria were identified by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The predominant species found in the control samples were Lysobacter-type species, Streptococcus salivarius, Veillonella dispar, unidentified oral bacterium, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Atopobium parvulum and Veillonella atypica. In the halitosis samples, Lysobacter-type species, S. salivarius, Prevotella melaninogenica, unidentified oral bacterium, Prevotella veroralis and Prevotella pallens were the most commonly found species. For the control samples, 13-16 (4.7-5.8%) of 276 clones represented uncultured species, whereas in the halitosis samples, this proportion increased to 6.5-9.6% (36-53 of 553 clones). In the control samples, 22 (8.0%) of 276 clones represented potentially novel phylotypes, and in the halitosis samples, this figure was 39 (7.1%) of 553 clones. The microflora associated with the tongue dorsum is complex in both the control and halitosis groups, but several key species predominate in both groups.
    Oral Diseases 05/2008; 14(3):251-8. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • A C Donaldson, M P Riggio, H J Rolph, J Bagg, P J Hodge
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    ABSTRACT: To develop and apply a detailed clinical protocol for screening and assessing subjects with a complaint of halitosis. Cross-sectional. Several methods were used to recruit subjects with a complaint of halitosis, including a newspaper advertisement. A definition of halitosis arising from within the oral cavity, which is not related to generalized chronic gingivitis, chronic periodontitis or pathology of the oral mucosa was used. An extensive list of exclusion criteria was applied at the initial visit. Eligible subjects were asked to follow strict instructions and complete a questionnaire prior to their second visit for data collection. The clinical examination consisted of an organoleptic assessment, Halimeter reading and periodontal examination. The best method of recruiting subjects was advertising. Of 66 individuals recruited, four failed to attend the screening visit and 25 were excluded. The main reasons for exclusion were poor oral hygiene and existing periodontal disease. Thirty-seven completed the full protocol, resulting in identification of 18 with halitosis and 19 controls. Application of the exclusion criteria resulted in significant attrition of eligible participants. Our results suggest that organoleptic assessment should be regarded as a useful standard for defining subjects with halitosis.
    Oral Diseases 02/2007; 13(1):63-70. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Determination of the microflora present on the tongue dorsum of subjects with and without halitosis using conventional microbiological culture methods. Twenty-one halitosis and 20 control patients were recruited using a strict clinical protocol. Samples were collected from the posterior dorsum of the tongue using a sterile brush. Each sample was vortex mixed for 30 s and serial 10-fold dilutions to 10(-7) were carried out. Samples were plated onto fastidious anaerobe agar (FAA) and FAA enriched with vancomycin. These were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 10 days at 37 degrees C. Strict anaerobes were identified by metronidazole sensitivity and bacteria were identified to genus level by a combination of colony morphology, Gram staining and biochemical and enzymatic tests (rapid ID 32 A). The predominant species in test and control groups were Veillonella sp. and Prevotella sp. Greater species diversity was found in the halitosis samples compared with controls. The halitosis samples contained an increased incidence of unidentifiable Gram-negative rods, Gram-positive rods and Gram-negative coccobacilli. There was no obvious association between halitosis and any specific bacterial genus. The increased species diversity found in halitosis samples suggests that halitosis may be the result of complex interactions between several bacterial species. The role of uncultivable bacteria may also be important in contributing to this process.
    Oral Diseases 02/2005; 11 Suppl 1:61-3. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • AC Donaldson, D McKenzie, AJ Flanagan, MP Riggio
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Determination of the microflora present on the tongue dorsum of subjects with and without halitosis using conventional microbiological culture methods. Methods Twenty-one halitosis and 20 control patients were recruited using a strict clinical protocol. Samples were collected from the posterior dorsum of the tongue using a sterile brush. Each sample was vortex mixed for 30 s and serial 10-fold dilutions to 10−7 were carried out. Samples were plated onto fastidious anaerobe agar (FAA) and FAA enriched with vancomycin. These were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 10 days at 37°C. Strict anaerobes were identified by metronidazole sensitivity and bacteria were identified to genus level by a combination of colony morphology, Gram staining and biochemical and enzymatic tests (rapid ID 32 A). Results The predominant species in test and control groups were Veillonella and Prevotella. Greater species diversity was found in the halitosis samples compared to controls. The halitosis samples contained a larger number of unidentifiable gram-negative rods, gram positive rods and gram negative coccobacilli. Conclusions There was no obvious association between halitosis and any specific bacterial genus. The increased species diversity found in halitosis samples suggests that halitosis may be the result of complex interactions between several bacterial species. The role of uncultivable bacteria may also be important in contributing to this process.
    Oral Diseases 01/2005; 11. · 2.38 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

70 Citations
9.51 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2005–2007
    • University of Glasgow
      Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
    • Glasgow School of Art
      Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom