Martin H K Hoffmann

Universität Ulm, Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Are you Martin H K Hoffmann?

Claim your profile

Publications (43)181.24 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Selecting the optimal phase for coronary artery evaluation can be challenging, especially at higher heart rates, given that the optimal phase may differ for each of the coronary arteries. This study aimed to evaluate a novel vessel-specific algorithm which automatically outputs the minimum motion phase per coronary artery. The study included 44 patients who underwent 256-slice cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of chest pain. End-systolic and mid-diastolic minimal motion phases were automatically calculated by a previously validated global motion algorithm and by a new vessel-specific algorithm which calculates the minimum motion for each of the three main coronary arteries, separately. Two readers blindly evaluated all coronary segments for image quality. Median scores per coronary artery were compared by the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The variation, per patient, between the optimal phases of the three coronary arteries was 5.0 ± 4.5% (1%-22%) for end systole and 4.8 ± 4.1% (0%-19%) for mid diastole. The mean image quality scores per coronary artery were 4.0 ± 0.61 for the vessel-specific approach and 3.80 ± 0.69 for the global phase selection (P < .001). Overall, 46 of 122 arteries had a better score with the vessel-specific approach and five with the standard global approach. Interreader agreement was substantial (k = 0.72). This study has shown that multiple phases are required to ensure optimal image quality for all three coronary arteries and that a vessel-specific phase selection algorithm achieves superior results to the standard global approach. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Academic Radiology 03/2015; 22(6). DOI:10.1016/j.acra.2015.01.013 · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare planimetric aortic valve area (AVA) measurements from 256-slice CT to those derived from transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and cardiac catheterization in high-risk subjects with known high-grade calcified aortic stenosis. The study included 26 subjects (10 males, mean age: 79±6; range, 61-88 years). All subjects were clinically referred for aortic valve imaging prior to percutaneous aortic valve replacement from April 2008 to March 2009. Two radiologists, blinded to the results of TEE and cardiac catheterization, independently selected the systolic cardiac phase of maximum aortic valve area and independently performed manual CT AVA planimetry for all subjects. Repeated AVA measurements were made to establish CT intra- and interobserver repeatability. In addition, the image quality of the aortic valve was rated by both observers. Aortic valve calcification was also quantified. All 26 subjects had a high-grade aortic valve stenosis (systolic opening area <1.0 cm(2)) via CT-based planimetry, with a mean AVA of 0.62±0.18. In four subjects, TEE planimetry was precluded due to severe aortic valve calcification, but CT-planimetry was successfully performed with a mean AVA of 0.46±0.23 cm(2). Mean aortic valve calcium mass score was 563.8±526.2 mg. Aortic valve area by CT was not correlated with aortic valve calcium mass score. A bias and limits of agreement among CT and TEE, CT and cardiac catheterization, and TEE and cardiac catheterization were -0.07 [-0.37 to 0.24], 0.03 [-0.49 to 0.55], 0.12 [-0.39 to 0.63]cm(2), respectively. Differences in AVA among CT and TEE or cardiac catheterization did not differ systematically over the range of measurements and were not correlated with aortic valve calcium mass score. Planimetric aortic valve area measurements from 256-slice CT agree well with those derived from TEE and cardiac catheterization in high-risk subjects with known high-grade calcified aortic stenosis.
    European journal of radiology 10/2011; 80(1):151-7. DOI:10.1016/j.ejrad.2010.07.015 · 2.16 Impact Factor
  • Martin H. K. Hoffmann
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1) Select appropriate acquisition protocols for performing coronary angiography utilizing 8cm detectors. 2) Select appropriate rest periods for image reconstruction at various heart rates. 3) Recognize the potential of prospectively gated axial acquisition protocols to reduce dose exposure. 4) Recognize the clinical potential of combined morphology and perfusion scanning. 5) Identify the different strategies of development in cardiac CT technology. ABSTRACT
    Radiological Society of North America 2010 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 12/2010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential clinical value of coronary plaque imaging with a new generation CT scanner and the interobserver variability of coronary plaque assessment with a new semiautomatic plaque analysis application. Thirty-five isolated plaques of the left anterior descending coronary artery from 35 patients were evaluated with a new semiautomatic plaque analysis application. All patients were scanned with a 256-slice MDCT scanner (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland OH, USA). Two independent observers evaluated lesion volume, maximum plaque burden, lesion CT number mean and standard deviation, and relative lesion composition. We found 10 noncalcified, 16 mixed, and 9 calcified lesions in our study cohort. Relative interobserver bias and variability for lesion volume were -37%, -13%, -49%, -44% and 28%, 16%, 37%, and 90% for all, noncalcified, mixed, and calcified lesions, respectively. Absolute interobserver bias and variability for relative lesion composition were 1.2%, 0.5%, 1.5%, 1.3% and 3.3%, 4.5%, 7.0%, and 4.4% for all, noncalcified, mixed, and calcified lesions, respectively. While mixed and calcified lesions demonstrated a high degree of lesion volume interobserver variability, noncalcified lesions had a lower degree of lesion volume interobserver variability. In addition, relative noncalcified lesion composition had a very low interobserver variability. Therefore, there may a role for MDCT in serial noncalcified plaque assessment with semiautomatic analysis software.
    The international journal of cardiovascular imaging 03/2010; 26(6):711-20. DOI:10.1007/s10554-010-9614-3 · 2.32 Impact Factor
  • Martin H.K. Hoffmann
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1) Select appropriate acquisition protocols for performing coronary angiography utilizing 8cm detectors. 2) Select appropriate rest periods for image reconstruction at various heart rates. 3)Recognize the potential of prospectively gated axial acquisition protocols to reduce dose exposure. 4) Recognize the clinical potential of combined morphology and perfusion scanning. 5) Identify the different strategies of development in cardiac CT technology. ABSTRACT
    Radiological Society of North America 2009 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 12/2009
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare image quality and effective radiation dose for prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography on 64- and 256-slice CT. The patient cohort consisted of 80 consecutive patients undergoing imaging with 256-slice CT and 80 patients with 64-slice CT. The two patient groups were demographically matched according to age, gender, body mass index and heart rate. For both groups, two observers independently assessed image quality for all coronary segments on a five-point ordinal scale. The two groups were compared with regard to image quality and effective radiation dose. Image quality scores less than 3 were considered non-diagnostic. Mean effective radiation dose did not significantly differ between the two groups (3.4 +/- 0.8 mSv in both groups; p > 0.1). Vessel-based image quality was significantly better in patients undergoing 256-slice CT compared with those undergoing 64-slice CT (p < 0.001). The proportion of assessable coronary segments significantly increased from 95.6% in the 64-slice group to 98.9% in the 256-slice group (p < 0.05). Prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography performed on 256-slice CT provides significantly improved and more stable image quality at an equivalent effective radiation dose compared with 64-slice CT.
    European Radiology 11/2009; 20(5):1124-31. DOI:10.1007/s00330-009-1652-7 · 4.34 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As diffusion-weighted imaging is increasingly implemented into routine protocols of abdominal MRI, abnormal findings in expected and unexpected locations become more common. The aim of our retrospective study was to investigate the specificity of restricted diffusion in differentiation of benign from malignant abdominal disease. Two hundred thirty consecutively registered patients underwent abdominal MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (single-shot spin-echo echo-planar sequence) with b values of 0, 150, 500, and 1,000 s/mm(2). Lesions were detected by two blinded readers using only the images with a b value of 1,000 s/mm(2), and representative apparent diffusion coefficients were measured. Lymph nodes were not documented. Fifty-two of the 230 patients had a total of 55 lesions with restricted diffusion (23.9%). The mean apparent diffusion coefficient was 809 mm(2)/s. Forty-three lesions (78.2%) were malignant. The 12 benign lesions were liver hemangioma, liver adenoma, autoimmune pancreatitis, pancreatic teratoma, two abscesses, three cases of inflammatory bowel wall thickening due to Crohn's disease, Bartholin cyst, hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, and renal Rosai-Dorfman disease. Restricted diffusion is generally considered to be associated with malignant tumors because of the high cellularity of these tumors. However, in interpretation of diffusion-weighted images, it should be kept in mind that a number of benign lesions, as many as 22% in our cohort, can exhibit restricted diffusion on images with high b values, thus mimicking malignant lesions.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 10/2009; 193(4):1070-6. DOI:10.2214/AJR.08.2093 · 2.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a respiratory biofeedback system could increase navigator efficiency and maintain image quality compared to conventional respiratory-gated magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA). Eighteen healthy volunteers underwent MRCA using three different respiratory-gating protocols. A conventional expiratory free-breathing (FB) sequence was compared to two approaches using navigator echo biofeedback (NEB), a midinspiratory approach (NEBin) and an expiratory approach (NEBex). Navigator data reflecting the position of the diaphragm relative to a 3-mm gating window were made available to the subject using a video projector in combination with a Plexiglas screen and mirror goggles. Image quality was graded by two radiologists in consensus using a visual score ranging from 1 (not visible) to 4 (excellent vessel depiction). The NEB approaches improved navigator efficiency (71.1% with NEBex and 68.0% with NEBin vs 42.2% with FB), thus reducing total imaging time. This difference was statistically significant (P(NEBin)=.007; P(NEBex)=.001). Image quality in the NEBex group was comparable to that in the FB group (median score, 2.44 vs 2.52), but it proved to be significantly lower (median score, 1.94 vs 2.52) for the right coronary artery and the left anterior descending coronary artery in the NEBin group. NEB maintains image quality and significantly increases navigator efficiency, thereby decreasing total imaging time by about 40% compared to a conventional FB acquisition strategy.
    Academic radiology 04/2009; 16(3):374-9. DOI:10.1016/j.acra.2008.08.015 · 2.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigated the influence of sublingual nitroglycerine (NTG) on the peripheral diameter, intraluminal contrast agent density, and image quality of coronary arteries during computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Thirty patients with sublingual NTG application were matched to 30 patients without NTG. The diameters of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the left circumflex coronary artery and the right coronary artery were measured at 1-, 4-, and 8-cm length of each vessel as well as the intraluminal contrast agent density along the LAD. Vessel diameters and contrast attenuation at 4 and 8 cm were referenced against the values at 1 cm and processed as percentage reduction. Image quality of the posterior descending artery was assessed subjectively by 2 independent observers. The percentage of peripheral vessel diameter reduction and the peripheral attenuation of contrast agent density for all measured coronary arteries was significantly smaller in the group with NTG administration. The image quality of the posterior descending artery was significantly higher in the group with NTG. Sublingual administration of NTG before CTCA results in improved diagnostic image quality because of a significant dilatation and improved intraluminal contrast agent density of the peripheral vessels.
    Journal of computer assisted tomography 01/2009; 33(2):199-203. DOI:10.1097/RCT.0b013e31817c6b33 · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • Martin H.K. Hoffmann
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1) Select appropriate acquisition protocols for performing coronary angiography utilizing 8cm detectors. 2) Select appropriate rest periods for image reconstruction at various heart rates. 3)Recognize the potential of prospectively gated axial acquisition protocols to reduce dose exposure. 4) Recognize the clinical potential of combined morphology and perfusion scanning. 5) Identify the different strategies of development in cardiac CT technology. ABSTRACT
    Radiological Society of North America 2008 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 12/2008
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE Image quality and radiation exposure with prospectively-gated axial CT coronary angiography (PGA) were compared using a 64 and 256 channel scanner. METHOD AND MATERIALS 60 patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent a prospectively-gated axial CT coronary angiography (CTCA). The patient cohort consisted of 30 consecutive patients scanned with a 256 channel scanner (iCT, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland OH, USA) and 30 patients scanned with a 64 channel scanner (Brilliance 64, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland OH, USA). Both groups were matched demographically according to age, gender, body mass index and heart rate. For both groups, two independent observers assessed image quality for all coronary segments on a five-point ordinal scale. Image quality and radiation exposure were compared between patient groups. RESULTS Mean (± SD) effective radiation exposure did not significantly differ between the 2 groups (3.9 ± 0.7 mSv compared to 3.7 ± 0.8 mSv). Vessel-based image quality was significantly better in the 256 channel scanner group (p <0.001). CONCLUSION Preliminary experience shows prospectively-gated axial CT coronary angiography performed on a 256 channel scanner provides better image quality compared to 64 channels while maintaining radiation exposure constant. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION The high image quality of 256 channel scanners combined with a low radiation exposure for will raise CT Coronary Angiography into a widespread diagnostic tool for the detection of CAD.
    Radiological Society of North America 2008 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 12/2008
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE To investigate whether a respiratory biofeedback system could significantly increase navigator efficiency and maintain image quality when compared to conventional respiratory gated MR coronary angiography (MRCA). METHOD AND MATERIALS Eighteen healthy volunteers underwent MRCA using three different respiratory gating protocols. A conventional expiratory free-breathing sequence (FB) was compared to a mid-inspiratory and an expiratory navigator echo biofeedback (NEBin resp. NEBex) approach. Navigator Data reflecting the position of the diaphragm relative to a 3 mm gating window were made available to the subject by using a video projector in combination with a plexiglass screen and mirror goggles. Image quality was graded using a visual score from 1 (not visible) to 4 (excellent). RESULTS The NEB approach improved navigator efficiency (NEBex 71.1% , NEBin 68.0% vs FB 42.2%) therefore reducing total imaging time. This difference was statistically significant (pNEBin=0.007, pNEBex=0.001). Image quality in the NEBex group was comparable to the FB group (2.44 vs 2.52), however it proved to be significantly lower (1.94 vs 2.52) for both vessels in the NEBin group. CONCLUSION Navigator Echo Biofeedback maintains image quality and significantly increases navigator efficiency, thereby decreasing total imaging time by about 40% compared to a conventional free breathing acquisition strategy. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION The time gained by the increased acquisition speed could be reinvested in increased temporal or spatial resolution, thereby significantly increasing image quality.
    Radiological Society of North America 2008 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 12/2008
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess image quality and radiation exposure with prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography (PGA) compared to retrospectively gated helical techniques (RGH). Forty patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and a stable heart rate below 65 bpm underwent CT coronary angiography (CTCA) using a 64-channel CT system. The patient cohort consisted of 20 consecutive patients examined using a PGA technique and 20 patients examined using a standard RGH technique. Both groups were matched demographically according to age, gender, body mass index, and heart rate. For both groups, two independent observers assessed image quality for all coronary segments on an ordinal scale from 1 (nonassessable) to 5 (excellent quality). Image quality and radiation exposure were compared between patient groups. There were no significant differences in vessel-based image quality between the two groups (P > 0.05). Mean (+/- SD) effective radiation exposure in the PGA group was 3.7 +/- 0.8 mSv compared to 18.9 +/- 3.8 mSv in the RGH group without ECG-based tube current modulation (P < 0.001). Preliminary experience shows PGA technique to be a promising approach for CTCA resulting in a substantial reduction in radiation exposure with image quality comparable to that of standard RGH technique.
    European Radiology 11/2008; 19(4):829-36. DOI:10.1007/s00330-008-1222-4 · 4.34 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to analyze the pulmonary vessel enhancement obtainable using high-density contrast material and saline flushing with automated bolus tracking for multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) pulmonary angiography in a routine clinical setting. Attenuation values of pulmonary vessels were retrospectively measured in 51 CT scans performed on a 40-channel MDCT for unselected emergency patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism. Mean vascular attenuation measured 326.7 +/- 104 Hounsfield units (HU) in the pulmonary trunk and 299.1 +/- 102 HU in the left distal lower lobe artery. Mean vascular attenuation values in the distal lower lobe artery were equal or higher than 150 HU for 94.1% (48/51) of patients. In conclusion, the combination of high-density contrast media and saline flushing with automated bolus tracking on a fast CT scanner reliably results in a homogenously high attenuation of pulmonary vessels, allowing precise delineation of clots down to the subsegmental level in MDCT pulmonary angiography.
    Journal of computer assisted tomography 11/2008; 32(6):893-8. DOI:10.1097/RCT.0b013e31815d6dcc · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether spectral computed tomography (CT) has the potential to improve luminal depiction by differentiating among intravascular gadolinium-based contrast agent, calcified plaque, and stent material by using the characteristic k edge of gadolinium. A preclinical spectral CT scanner with a photon-counting detector and six energy threshold levels was used to scan a phantom vessel. A partially occluded stent was simulated by using a calcified plaque isoattenuated to a surrounding gadolinium chelate solution. The reconstructed images showed an effective isolation of the gadolinium with subsequent clear depiction of the perfused vessel lumen. The calcified plaque and the stent material are suppressed.
    Radiology 11/2008; 249(3):1010-6. DOI:10.1148/radiol.2492080560 · 6.21 Impact Factor
  • Circulation 11/2007; 116(16):e385-7. DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.713420 · 14.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Comparison of cleansing effects and colonic distension observed with two polyethyleneglycol-solution (PEG) containing bowel preparation techniques prior to CT-colonography (CTC). One hundred and three patients that received CTC in our institution were retrospectively evaluated. Fifty-one patients received preparation 1 (BP1; based on a GoLytely formulation+bisacodyl), 52 preparation 2 (BP2; based on a NuLytely formulation+bisacodyl). On multi-planar-reformatted (MPR) images, fluid residuals and colon distension were assessed in five colonic segments, from the ascending colon to the rectum. On average, significantly (p<0.001) lower fluid residuals were assesses when using BP2 regardless of the patient position. In prone position, a significantly lower fluid level was observed in the sigmoid using bowel preparation 2. The average maximum diameter measured for the whole colon was 5.2+/-0.6 cm in prone position and 4.8+/-0.6 cm in the supine position in BP1 (p<0.01). In BP2 the average maximum diameter measured for the whole colon was 5.3+/-0.6 cm in prone position and 4.7+/-0.5 cm in supine position, respectively (p<0.001). Overall, lower fluid residuals were scored using BP2. In both preparation groups we achieved better colonic distension in prone position. We were not able to distend the sigmoid better when insufflating air during patient repositioning.
    European Journal of Radiology 12/2006; 60(3):460-4. DOI:10.1016/j.ejrad.2006.08.009 · 2.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Mario J Garcia, Jonathan Lessick, Martin H K Hoffmann
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been proposed as a noninvasive method to evaluate coronary anatomy. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of 16-row MDCT for the detection of obstructive coronary disease based exclusively on quantitative analysis and performed in a multicenter study. Eleven participating sites prospectively enrolled 238 patients who were clinically referred for nonemergency coronary angiography from June 2004 through March 2005. Following a low-dose MDCT scan to evaluate coronary artery calcium, 187 patients with an Agatston score of less than 600 underwent contrast-enhanced MDCT. Conventional angiography was performed 1 to 14 days after MDCT. Conventional angiographic and MDCT studies were analyzed by independent core laboratories. Segment-based and patient-based sensitivities and specificities for the detection of luminal stenosis of more than 50% (of luminal diameter) and more than 70% (of luminal diameter) based on quantitative coronary angiography. Of 1629 nonstented segments larger than 2 mm in diameter, there were 89 (5.5%) in 59 (32%) of 187 patients with stenosis of more than 50% by conventional angiography. Of the 1629 segments, 71% were evaluable on MDCT. After censoring all nonevaluable segments as positive, the sensitivity for detecting more than 50% luminal stenoses was 89%; specificity, 65%; positive predictive value, 13%; and negative predictive value, 99%. In a patient-based analysis, the sensitivity for detecting patients with at least 1 positive segment was 98%; specificity, 54%; positive predictive value, 50%; and negative predictive value, 99%. After censoring all nonevaluable segments as positive, the sensitivity for detecting more than 70% luminal stenoses was 94%; specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 6%; and negative predictive value, 99%. In a patient-based analysis, the sensitivity for detecting patients with at least 1 positive segment was 94%; specificity, 51%; positive predictive value, 28%; and negative predictive value, 98%. The results of this study indicate that MDCT coronary angiography performed with 16-row scanners is limited by a high number of nonevaluable cases and a high false-positive rate. Thus, its routine implementation in clinical practice is not justified. Nevertheless, given its high sensitivity and negative predictive value, 16-row MDCT may be useful in excluding coronary disease in selected patients in whom a false-positive or inconclusive stress test result is suspected.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 08/2006; 296(4):403-11. DOI:10.1001/jama.296.4.403 · 30.39 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Low motion phases for cardiac computed tomography reconstructions are currently detected manually in a user-dependent selection process which is often time consuming and suboptimal. The concept of motion maps was recently introduced to achieve automatic phase selection. This pilot study compared the accuracy of motion-map phase selection to that with manual iterative selection. The study included 20 patients, consisting of one group with low and one with high heart rate. The technique automatically derives a motion strength function between multiple low-resolution reconstructions through the cardiac cycle, with periods of lowest difference between neighboring phases indicating minimal cardiac motion. A high level of agreement was found for phase selection achieved with the motion map approach compared with the manual iterative selection process. The motion maps allowed automated quiescent phase detection of the cardiac cycle in 85% of cases, with best results at low heart rates and for the left coronary artery. They can also provide additional information such as the presence of breathing artifacts. Motion maps show promise as a rapid off-line tool to automatically detect quiescent cardiac phases in a variety of patients.
    European Radiology 03/2006; 16(2):365-73. DOI:10.1007/s00330-005-2849-z · 4.34 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The role of 16-slice spiral CT was evaluated in the diagnosis of coronary stenosis, with selective X-ray coronary angiography (SCA) serving as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients who were suspected of having coronary heart disease, without percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary bypass-grafting, were investigated using 16-slice CT. Eight patients with pre-scan heart rate of more than 80 beats/min were given beta-blockers. After the retrospectively ECG-gated axial imaging reconstruction, volume redering (VR), multi-planar reconstruction (MPR), curved MPR and maximum intensity projection (MIP) were used to reconstruct. Every segment of coronary artery with a diameter > or = 1.5 mm was assessed, and the presence on CT with a stenosis exceeding 50% diameter reduction was compared with that on SCA. The reasons which lead to some segments unevaluable were analysed. Compared with SCA, 93% coronary segments and 94% main branches were evaluable. Residual cardiac motion artifacts, severe calcification and poor opacification made 58%, 28% and 14% of the remaining 60 segments unevaluable respectively. Without routine administration of beta-blockers, good coronary imaging quality can be acquired using 16-slice spiral CT. It is a reliable noninvasive method for detection of obstructive coronary artery disease.
    Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology 02/2006; 26(3):338-40. DOI:10.1007/BF02829569 · 0.78 Impact Factor