Amporn Rungrod

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Bang Kadi, Pathum Thani, Thailand

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Publications (8)14.83 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cyt2Aa2 is a mosquito larvicidal and cytolytic toxin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. darmstadiensis. The toxin becomes inactive when isoleucine at position 150 was replaced by alanine. To investigate the functional role of this position, Ile150 was substituted with Leu, Phe, Glu and Lys. All mutant proteins were produced at high level, solubilized in carbonate buffer and yielded protease activated product similar to those of the wild type. Intrinsic fluorescence spectra analysis suggested that these mutants retain similar folding to the wild type. However, mosquito larvicidal and hemolytic activities dramatically decreased for the I150K and were completely abolished for I150A and I150F mutants. Membrane binding and oligomerization assays demonstrated that only I150E and I150L could bind and form oligomers on lipid membrane similar to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that amino acid at position 150 plays an important role during membrane binding and oligomerization of Cyt2Aa2 toxin. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(3): 175-180].
    BMB reports 03/2013; 46(3):175-80. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The binary toxin produced from Bacillus sphaericus is highly toxic against larvae of Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes. The two major components of the binary toxin are 42-kDa BinA and 51-kDa BinB, which are produced as crystalline inclusions during sporulation. Currently, there is no detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanism of the binary toxin, mainly due to the lack of structural information. Herein, we describe an expression protocol with modified conditions allowing production of soluble, biologically active BinA and BinB for further structural analysis. The binA and binB genes from B. sphaericus 2297 strain were independently cloned and fused with a polyhistidine tag at their N-termini. Both (His)(6)-tagged BinA and (His)(6)-tagged BinB were expressed as soluble forms at low temperature. Highly pure proteins were obtained after two-step purification by Ni-NTA affinity and size exclusion chromatography. In vitro activation by trypsin digestion generated a resistant fragment, of 40kDa for BinA, and of 45kDa for BinB, and an oligomeric complex of BinA and BinB in solution was observed after proteolytic activation. Their functional and structural properties were confirmed by a biological assay and far-UV circular dichroism, respectively. The mixture of BinA and BinB, either as a protoxin or as a trypsin-activated form, exhibited high mosquito-larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae with LC(50) of about 10ng/ml, while no toxicity was observed from the single binary toxin component. Results from far-UV circular dichroism of BinA and BinB suggest the presence of mainly β-structure. The expression and purification protocols reported here will be useful for the production of the active and homogeneous binary toxin to allow further detailed structural investigation.
    Protein Expression and Purification 02/2012; 82(2):368-72. · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • ChemInform 01/2010; 32(44).
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    ABSTRACT: Mtx1 and Mtx2 are mosquitocidal toxins produced by some strains of Bacillus sphaericus during vegetative phase of growth. Mtx1 from B. sphaericus 2297 shows higher toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae than to Aedes aegypti larvae whereas Mtx2 from B. sphaericus 2297 shows lower toxicity against C. quinquefasciatus than to A. aegypti larvae. To test synergism of these toxins against A. aegypti larvae, mtx1 and mtx2 genes were cloned into a single plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. Cells producing both Mtx1 and Mtx2 toxins exhibited high synergistic activity against A. aegypti larvae approximately 10 times compared to cells expressing only a single toxin. Co-expression of both toxins offers an alternative to improve efficacy of recombinant bacterial insecticides. There is a high possibility to develop these toxins to be used as an environmentally friendly mosquito control agent.
    Biotechnology Letters 01/2009; 31(4):551-5. · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cyt2Aa2 produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. darmstadiensis exhibits in vitro cytolytic activity against broad range of cells but shows specific in vivo toxicity against larvae of Dipteran insects. To investigate the role of amino acids in alphaA and alphaC of this toxin, 3 single-point mutants (A61C, S108C and V109A) were generated. All 3 mutant proteins were highly produced as inclusion bodies that could be solubilized and activated by proteinase K similar to that of the wild type. Hemolytic activity of A61C and S108C mutants was significantly reduced whereas the V109A mutant showed comparable hemolytic activity to the wild type. Interestingly, the A61C mutant exhibited high larvicidal activity to both Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. S108C and V109A mutants showed low activity against C. quinquefasciatus but relatively high toxicity to A. aegypti. These results demonstrated for the first time that amino acids in alphaA and alphaC are involved in the selectivity of the Cyt toxin to the targeted organism.
    Journal of Biotechnology 03/2008; 133(3):287-93. · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fungal type I polyketide (PK) compounds are highly valuable for medical treatment and extremely diverse in structure, partly because of the enzymatic activities of reducing domains in polyketide synthases (PKSs). We have cloned several PKS genes from the fungus Xylaria sp. BCC 1067, which produces two polyketides: depudecin (reduced PK) and 19,20-epoxycytochalasin Q (PK-nonribosomal peptide (NRP) hybrid). Two new degenerate primer sets, KA-series and XKS, were designed to amplify reducing PKS and PKS-NRP synthetase hybrid genes, respectively. Five putative PKS genes were amplified in Xylaria using KA-series primers and two more with the XKS primers. All seven are predicted to encode proteins homologous to highly reduced (HR)-type PKSs. Previously designed primers in LC-, KS-, and MT-series identified four additional PKS gene fragments. Selected PKS fragments were used as probes to identify PKS genes from the genomic library of this fungus. Full-length sequences for five PKS genes were obtained: pks12, pks3, pksKA1, pksMT, and pksX1. They are structurally diverse with 1-9 putative introns and products ranging from 2162 to 3654 amino acids in length. The finding of 11 distinct PKS genes solely by means of PCR cloning supports that PKS genes are highly diverse in fungi. It also indicates that our KA-series primers can serve as powerful tools to reveal the genetic potential of fungi in production of multiple types of HR PKs, which the conventional compound screening could underestimate.
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 11/2005; 251(1):125-36. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel secondary metabolite, pughiinin A, together with pycnidione, mevalonolactone, and 7-hydroxy-2-methylchromanone, was isolated from the seed fungus Kionochaeta pughii BCC 3878. The chemical structure was established by spectroscopic methods and by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Pughiinin A and pycnidione exhibited in vitro antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum (K1 strain). Pycnidione also showed anti-cancer activity against KB and BC cell lines with the IC 50 values of 2.0 and 1.6 microg/mL, respectively.
    Planta Medica 12/2002; 68(11):1017-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three known compounds, 2-hexylidene-3-methylsuccinic acid (1), cytochalasin Q (2), and 5-carboxymellein (3), together with two new derivatives, 2-hexylidene-3-methylsuccinic acid 4-methyl ester (4) and an ophiobolane sesterterpene named halorosellinic acid (5), were isolated from culture broth of the marine fungus Halorosellinia oceanica BCC 5149. Compounds 1-3 exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against KB and BC-1 cell lines with IC(50) values of 1-13 microg/mL, while compounds 2, 3, 5, and 6 showed antimalarial activity with respective IC(50) values of 17, 4, 13, and 19 microg/mL. Halorosellinic acid (5) possessed only weak antimycobacterial activity with the minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 microg/mL.
    Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 09/2001; 11(15):1965-9. · 2.34 Impact Factor