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Publications (5)6.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 30% of a genome encodes for membrane proteins. They are one of the most important classes of proteins in that they can receive, differentiate, and transmit intra- and intercellular signals. Some examples of classes of membrane proteins include cell-adhesion molecules, translocases, and receptors in signaling pathways. Defects in membrane proteins may be involved in a number of serious disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's) and diabetes. Furthermore, membrane proteins provide natural entry and anchoring points for the molecular agents of infectious diseases. Thus, membrane proteins constitute ~50% of known and novel drug targets. Progress in this area is slowed by the requirement to develop methods and procedures for expression and isolation that are tailored to characteristic properties of membrane proteins. A set of standard protocols for the isolation of the targets in quantities that allow for the characterization of their individual properties for further optimization is required. The standard protocols given below represent a workable starting point. If optimization of yields is desired, a variation of conditions as outlined in the theory section is recommended.
    Methods in enzymology 01/2014; 541:117-40. · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the development of immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and describes its most important applications. We provide an overview on the use of IMAC in protein fractionation and proteomics, in protein immobilization and detection, and on some special applications such as purification of immunoglobulins and the Chelex method. The most relevant application- purification of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins-will be reviewed in greater detail with focus of state-of-the-art materials, methods, and protocols, and the limitations of IMAC and recent advances to improve the technology and the methods will be described.
    Protein Expression and Purification 09/2011; · 1.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the development of immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and describes its most important applications. We provide an overview on the use of IMAC in protein fractionation and proteomics, in protein immobilization and detection, and on some special applications such as purification of immunoglobulins and the Chelex method. The most relevant application—purification of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins—will be reviewed in greater detail with focus of state-of-the-art materials, methods, and protocols, and the limitations of IMAC and recent advances to improve the technology and the methods will be described.
    Methods in Enzymology - METH ENZYMOLOGY. 01/2009; 463:439-473.
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the development of immobilized-metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and describes its most important applications. We provide an overview on the use of IMAC in protein fractionation and proteomics, in protein immobilization and detection, and on some special applications such as purification of immunoglobulins and the Chelex method. The most relevant application-purification of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins-will be reviewed in greater detail with focus of state-of-the-art materials, methods, and protocols, and the limitations of IMAC and recent advances to improve the technology and the methods will be described.
    Methods in enzymology 01/2009; 463:439-73. · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe an efficient strategy to produce high-quality proteins by using a single large IMAC chromatography column and enzymatic His-tag removal via the TAGZyme system in pilot scale. Numerous quality assays demonstrated a high purity of the final product, the human cytokine Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The protein preparation was apparently free of host cell proteins, endotoxins, protease, and aggregates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of IL-1beta was in full agreement with the natural mature form of IL-1beta. The homogeneity of the product was further shown by X-ray structure determination which confirmed the previously solved structure of the protein. We propose the applied workflow as a strategy for industrial production of protein-based biopharmaceuticals.
    Protein Expression and Purification 03/2008; 57(2):244-54. · 1.43 Impact Factor