Zoé Coutsinos

Groupe Hospitalier Saint Vincent, Strasburg, Alsace, France

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Publications (8)21.28 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: There are insufficient data regarding the efficacy and safety of vaccination in patients with auto-immune disease (AID) and/or drug-related immune deficiency (DRID). The objective of this study was to obtain professional agreement on vaccine practices in these patients. A Delphi survey was carried out with physicians recognised for their expertise in vaccinology and/or the caring for adult patients with AID and/or DRID. For each proposed vaccination practice, the experts' opinion and level of agreement were evaluated. The proposals relating to patients with AID specified: the absence of risk of AID relapse following vaccination; the possibility of administering live virus vaccines (LVV) to patients not receiving immunosuppressants; the pertinence of determining protective antibody titre before vaccination; the absence of need for specific monitoring following the vaccination. The proposals relating to patients with DRID specified that a 3-6 month delay is needed between the end of these treatments and the vaccination with LVV. There is no contraindication to administering LVV in patients receiving systemic corticosteroids prescribed for less than two weeks, regardless of their dose, or at a daily dose not exceeding 10mg of prednisone, if this involves prolonged treatment. Out of 14 proposals, the level of agreement between the experts was "very good" for eleven, and "good" for the remaining three. Proposals for vaccine practices in patients with AID and/or DRID should aid with decision-making in daily medical practice and provide better vaccine coverage for these patients.
    Vaccine 02/2009; 27(10):1523-9. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome induce account for over 40 million deaths in the past 20 years. Given that the currently available treatments to prevent HIV transmission and disease are not effective in eradicating the virus, vaccination likely represents the only efficacious adapted response to the global impact of this infection. This paper reviews the challenges encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine as well as the different vaccine approaches and main HIV vaccine candidates evaluated in clinical trials. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND KEY POINTS: In spite the tremendous progress in HIV research, the major challenges that are encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine remain of scientific order and include viral specificities, absence of correlates of immune protection and limitations of existing animal models. Over 30 vaccine candidates have been evaluated in clinical trials. These vaccine approaches include the use of recombinant envelope proteins, DNA vaccines, live-vectored recombinant vaccines, subunit vaccines and prime-boost regimens combining various vaccine candidates. Although the protective efficacy of these candidate vaccines has yet to be demonstrated, some vaccination regiments appear to dampen initial viremia and prolong disease-free survival. FUTURE PROSPECTS AND PROJECTS: Faced with the challenges in developing an HIV vaccine, international consortia and new methodologies have been proposed in order to accelerate the development and screening process of new candidate HIV vaccines. Moreover, in the absence of a protective vaccine, the impact of a vaccine that confers partial protection needs to be seriously considered.
    La Revue de Médecine Interne 03/2008; 29(8):632-41. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome induce account for over 40 million deaths in the past 20 years. Given that the currently available treatments to prevent HIV transmission and disease are not effective in eradicating the virus, vaccination likely represents the only efficacious adapted response to the global impact of this infection. This paper reviews the challenges encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine as well as the different vaccine approaches and main HIV vaccine candidates evaluated in clinical trials.
    Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2008; 29(8):632-641.
  • Joint, bone, spine: revue du rhumatisme 01/2008; 74(6):563-5. · 2.25 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 01/2008; 48. · 9.86 Impact Factor
  • Revue Du Rhumatisme - REV RHUM. 01/2007; 74(10):966-968.
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    ABSTRACT: Emergence of viral variants that escape CTL control is a major hurdle in HIV vaccination unless such variants affect gene regions that are essential for virus replication. Vaccine-induced multispecific CTL could also be able to control viral variants replication. To explore these possibilities, we extensively characterized CTL responses following vaccination with an epitope-based lipopeptide vaccine and challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. The viral sequences corresponding to the epitopes present in the vaccine as well as the viral loads were then determined in every macaque following SIV inoculation. In most cases, the emergence of several viral variants or mutants within vaccine CTL epitopes after SIV challenge resulted in increased viral loads except for a single macaque, which showed a single escape viral variant within its 6 vaccine-induced CTL epitopes. These findings provide a better understanding of the evolution of CD8+ epitope variations after vaccination-induced CTL expansion and might provide new insight for the development of an effective HIV vaccine.
    Virology Journal 02/2006; 3:65. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous clinical and experimental observations have shown that cellular immunity, in particular CD8+ T-lymphocytes, plays an important role in the control of HIV infection. We have focused on a lipopeptide vaccination strategy that has been shown to induce polyepitopic T-cell responses in both animals and humans, in order to deliver simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antigens to rhesus macaques. Given the relevance of antigen administration route in the development of an effective cellular immune response, this study was designed to assess SIV lipopeptide immunizations administered either by the intradermal (ID) or the intramuscular (IM) routes in their ability to elicit GAG and NEF multispecific T-lymphocytes in the rhesus macaque. Antigen specific T-cell responses were observed between 7 and 11 weeks following vaccination in both groups. Macaques immunized by the IM route yielded antigen-specific IFN-gamma secreting lymphocytes in response to no more than two pools of peptides derived from SIV-NEF. In contrast, among the four ID-immunized macaques, two presented multi-specific T-cell responses to as many as four pools of SIV-NEF and/or GAG peptides. Responses persisted 16 weeks following the vaccination protocol in one of the ID-vaccinated macaques. The induction of such responses is of great clinical relevance in the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Given the crucial role of CD8+ T-lymphocytes in HIV/SIV containment, vaccination through the intradermal route should merit high consideration in the development of an AIDS vaccine.
    FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology 04/2005; 43(3):357-66. · 2.68 Impact Factor