Z. Absi

Université René Descartes - Paris 5, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (4)5.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Immunization of healthcare workers (HCWs) is a major issue for infection control in healthcare facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge regarding occupational vaccinations, HBV, varicella and influenza vaccination rates and attitudes towards influenza vaccine among HCWs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two wards (Medicine and Paediatrics) of a 1182-bed teaching hospital in Paris, France. A standardized, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was used. Of 580 HCWs, 395 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Knowledge about the occupational vaccinations of HCWs was low. HBV (69%), tuberculosis (54%) and influenza (52%) were the most cited vaccinations. Paediatric staff was more aware of influenza and pertussis immunizations (p<.05). HBV vaccination rate was 93%, among whom 65% were aware of their immune status. Influenza vaccination rate for 2006-2007 was 30% overall, ranging from 50% among physicians to 20% among paramedical staff (p<.05). Physicians based their refusal on doubts about vaccine efficacy, although paramedics feared side effects. Influenza vaccination was associated with knowledge of vaccine recommendations [OR=1.75, 95% CI: 1.13-2.57] and contact with patients [OR=3.05, 95% CI: 1.50-5.91]. Knowledge of recommended occupational vaccinations is insufficient in HCWs, except for HBV and influenza. Although the HBV vaccine coverage of HCWs is satisfactory, a large proportion of them is unaware of immune status. Influenza vaccine coverage remains low, especially among paramedical staff because of fear of side effects. As vaccine coverage is associated with knowledge, educational campaigns should be strengthened to increase the adhesion of HCWs to vaccinations.
    Vaccine 06/2009; 27(31):4240-3. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Méthode Auto questionnaire anonyme sur les vaccinations professionnelles obligatoires recommandées par le Haut Conseil de la Santé Publique et leur couverture vaccinale au personnel des pôles de médecine et de pédiatrie du Groupe Hospitalier Cochin-Saint-Vincent de Paul (Paris) en février 2007. Résultats 395 réponses : 280 en médecine et 115 en pédiatrie. 92 et 96 % des personnes interrogées en médecine et pédiatrie ont répondu connaître les vaccinations obligatoires pour les professionnels de santé mais seulement 19 % des personnels de médecine et 28 % de pédiatrie ont cité les 3 vaccinations obligatoires (p < 0,05) ; 70 % (médecine) et 88 % (pédiatrie) ont répondu connaître les vaccinations recommandées (p < 0,01) : grippe, coqueluche, rougeole et varicelle sont citées respectivement dans 68, 15, 6 et 5 % des cas. Respectivement 91 et 97 % des personnels de médecine et pédiatrie ont déclaré être vaccinés contre l’hépatite B (p = 0,03). 28 % des personnels de médecine et 36 % de pédiatrie ont été vaccinés contre la grippe (p = 0,12) : 50 % des médecins, 43 % des étudiants, 23 % des infirmiers, 22 % des aides-soignants. Les motifs de cette vaccination étaient de protéger les patients (73 %) et se protéger soi-même (67 %). Les facteurs de non vaccination étaient l’inutilité de la vaccination (53 %) et la crainte des effets secondaires (21 %). Parmi les personnels de médecine 19 % ne pensait pas avoir eu la varicelle et 10 % avait fait une sérologie, 14 et 13 % en pédiatrie. Conclusion Ces résultats montrent une connaissance imparfaite des personnels de santé des vaccinations obligatoires et recommandées et confirment la faible couverture vaccinale antigrippale, le plus souvent par manque de reconnaissance de son utilité. Ils soulignent l’importance de poursuivre les efforts d’information des personnels de santé.
    Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses 06/2008; 38. · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome induce account for over 40 million deaths in the past 20 years. Given that the currently available treatments to prevent HIV transmission and disease are not effective in eradicating the virus, vaccination likely represents the only efficacious adapted response to the global impact of this infection. This paper reviews the challenges encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine as well as the different vaccine approaches and main HIV vaccine candidates evaluated in clinical trials. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND KEY POINTS: In spite the tremendous progress in HIV research, the major challenges that are encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine remain of scientific order and include viral specificities, absence of correlates of immune protection and limitations of existing animal models. Over 30 vaccine candidates have been evaluated in clinical trials. These vaccine approaches include the use of recombinant envelope proteins, DNA vaccines, live-vectored recombinant vaccines, subunit vaccines and prime-boost regimens combining various vaccine candidates. Although the protective efficacy of these candidate vaccines has yet to be demonstrated, some vaccination regiments appear to dampen initial viremia and prolong disease-free survival. FUTURE PROSPECTS AND PROJECTS: Faced with the challenges in developing an HIV vaccine, international consortia and new methodologies have been proposed in order to accelerate the development and screening process of new candidate HIV vaccines. Moreover, in the absence of a protective vaccine, the impact of a vaccine that confers partial protection needs to be seriously considered.
    La Revue de Médecine Interne 03/2008; 29(8):632-41. · 0.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PurposeThe human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome induce account for over 40 million deaths in the past 20 years. Given that the currently available treatments to prevent HIV transmission and disease are not effective in eradicating the virus, vaccination likely represents the only efficacious adapted response to the global impact of this infection. This paper reviews the challenges encountered in the development of an HIV vaccine as well as the different vaccine approaches and main HIV vaccine candidates evaluated in clinical trials.
    Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2008; 29(8):632-641.

Publication Stats

44 Citations
5.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      • Faculty of medicine
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • Groupe Hospitalier Saint Vincent
      Strasburg, Alsace, France