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Publications (3)5.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recently there has been a strong impetus to develop minimally invasive techniques in endocrine neck surgery. This study was designed to investigate the potential benefits of two minimally invasive thyroidectomy procedures, namely video-assisted and open minimal-incision thyroidectomy (VAT and MIT, respectively) when compared with conventional thyroidectomy. Between May 2000 and June 2006, a prospective, nonrandomized study was performed on 957 consecutive patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Fifty-six (5.8%) patients underwent VAT, 214 (22.4%) underwent MIT, and 687 (71.8%) underwent a conventional procedure. Patients were selected for VAT when total thyroid volume was < or =30 ml and for MIT when total thyroid volume was >30 but < or =80 ml as determined by ultrasonography. The length of the central neck skin incision was 1.5-2 cm for VAT, 2.5-3.5 cm for MIT, and 6-10 cm for the conventional operation. The incidence of definitive hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal palsy after VAT or MIT was comparable with that occurring after conventional treatment. Patients having VAT or MIT experienced significantly less postoperative pain than patients undergoing conventional treatment. Less pain was also registered in the VAT patient cohort when compared with the MIT cohort. Patients having VAT or MIT were more satisfied with the cosmetic result than patients who underwent conventional treatment, but no significant differences in patient satisfaction were found between the VAT and MIT groups. When compared with conventional treatment, VAT and MIT provided significant benefit in terms of cosmetic results and postoperative pain. Nevertheless, the main limiting factor for minimally invasive thyroid surgery still remains the size of the thyroid.
    World Journal of Surgery 01/2008; 32(1):45-50. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to investigate the potential benefits and limits of two minimally invasive thyroidectomy procedures, namely minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) and open minimal-incision thyroidectomy (MIT). From May 2000 to June 2006, a prospective, non-randomised study was performed on 957 consecutive patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Fifty-six (5.8%) underwent MIVAT, 214 (22.4%) MIT and 687 (71.8%) conventional thyroidectomy (CT). Patients were selected for MIVAT when total thyroid volume was < or = 30 mL and for MIT when total thyroid volume was > 30 but < or = 80 mL, as determined by ultrasonography. The length of the central neck skin incision was 1.5-2 cm for MIVAT, 2.5-3.5 cm for MIT and 6-10 cm for CT. The incidence of definitive hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal palsy after MIVAT or MIT was comparable to that occurring after CT. Patients undergoing MIVAT or MIT experienced significantly less postoperative pain than those undergoing CT. Less pain was also registered in the MIVAT patient cohort as compared to the MIT group. Patients undergoing MIVAT or MIT were more satisfied with the cosmetic result as compared to those undergoing CT, whereas no significant differences were found between the MIVAT and MIT groups. As compared to CT, MIVAT and MIT provided a significant improvement in terms of cosmetic results and postoperative pain. Nevertheless, the main limiting factor for minimally invasive thyroid surgery still remains the size of the thyroid.
    Chirurgia italiana 01/2008; 60(2):213-20.
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    ABSTRACT: This retrospective study evaluates the effect of abdominal hysterectomy on patients affected by descending perineum syndrome. Eighty-nine female patients affected by descending perineum syndrome and one group of 10 healthy women with normal bowel habits were studied retrospectively. Thirty-two descending perineum syndrome patients (Group 1) had received an abdominal hysterectomy for benign diseases, while 57 descending perineum syndrome patients (Group 2) had not undergone this surgery. All 99 subjects underwent clinical evaluation, computerized anorectal manometry, and defecography. Dyschezia was found predominantly in Group 2 subjects (P < 0.05). Fecal incontinence was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P < 0.05). The worst anal resting pressure was found in the incontinent Group 1 patients (P < 0.01). Rectoanal intussusception was a significant defecographic sign in Group 1 subjects (P < 0.05). Clinical evaluation and instrumental data suggested a possible link between fecal incontinence and abdominal hysterectomy in patients affected by descending perineum syndrome.
    Diseases of the Colon & Rectum 12/2005; 48(11):2094-9. · 3.34 Impact Factor