Neil Cobelli

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City, NY, United States

Are you Neil Cobelli?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)45.02 Total impact

  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aging-related oxidative stress has been linked to degenerative modifications in different organs and tissues. Using redox proteomic analysis and illustrative tandem mass spectrometry mapping, we demonstrate oxidative posttranslational modifications in structural proteins of intervertebral discs (IVDs) isolated from aging mice. Increased protein carbonylation was associated with protein fragmentation and aggregation. Complementing these findings, a significant loss of elasticity and increased stiffness was measured in fibrocartilage from aging mice. Studies using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence revealed a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structures of purified collagens following oxidation. Collagen unfolding and oxidation promoted both nonenzymatic and enzymatic degradation. Importantly, induction of oxidative modification in healthy fibrocartilage recapitulated the biochemical and biophysical modifications observed in the aging IVD. Together, these results suggest that protein carbonylation, glycation, and lipoxidation could be early events in promoting IVD degenerative changes.
    Chemistry & biology 07/2013; 20(7):922-34. · 6.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals-food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease-offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment.
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences 01/2013; 14(11):23063-23085. · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The goal of Accountable Care Organizations is to improve patient outcomes while maximizing the value of the services provided. This will be achieved through the use of performance and quality measures that facilitate efficient, cost-effective, evidence-based care. By creating a network connecting primary care physicians, specialists, rehabilitation facilities and hospitals, patient care should be maximized while at the same time delivering appropriate value for those services provided. The Medicare Shared Savings Program will financially reward ACOs that meet performance standards while at the same time lowering costs. The orthopaedic surgeon can only benefit by understanding how to participate in and negotiate the complexities of these organizations.
    Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine 10/2012;
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Endosomal functions are contingent on the integrity of the organelle-limiting membrane, whose disruption induces inflammation and cell death. Here we show that phagocytosis of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene particles induces damage to the endosomal-limiting membrane and results in the leakage of cathepsins into the cytosol and NLRP3-inflammasome activation. Annexin A2 recruitment to damaged organelles is shown by two-dimensional DIGE protein profiling, endosomal fractionation, confocal analysis of endogenous and annexin A2-GFP transfected cells, and immunogold labelling. Binding experiments, using fluorescent liposomes, confirms annexin A2 recruitment to endosomes containing phagocytosed polyethylene particles. Finally, an increase in cytosolic cathepsins, NLRP3-inflammasome activation, and IL-1 production is seen in dendritic cells from annexin A2-null mice, following exposure to polyethylene particles. Together, the results indicate a functional role of annexin A2 binding to endosomal membranes following organelle destabilization.
    Nature Communications 01/2012; 3:755. · 10.02 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by the breakdown of articular cartilage that is mediated in part by increased production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases (ADAMTS), enzymes that degrade components of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Efforts to design synthetic inhibitors of MMPs/ADAMTS have only led to limited clinical success. In addition to pharmacologic therapies, physiologic joint loading is widely recommended as a nonpharmacologic approach to improve joint function in osteoarthritis. Clinical trials report that moderate levels of exercise exert beneficial effects, such as improvements in pain and physical function. Experimental studies demonstrate that mechanical loading mitigates joint destruction through the downregulation of MMPs/ADAMTS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects of physiologic loading on arthritic joints are not well understood. We review here the recent progress on mechanotransduction in articular joints, highlighting the mediators and pathways in the maintenance of cartilage integrity, especially in the prevention of cartilage degradation in OA.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 12/2011; 1240:32-7. · 4.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Joint replacement surgery is one of the success stories of modern medicine, restoring mobility, diminishing pain and improving the overall quality of life for millions of people. Unfortunately, wear of these prostheses over time generates debris, which activates an innate immune response that can ultimately lead to periprosthetic resorption of bone (osteolysis) and failure of the implant. Over the past decade, the biological interactions between the particulate debris from various implant materials and the immune system have begun to be better understood. The wear debris induces a multifaceted immune response encompassing the generation of reactive oxygen species and damage-associated molecular patterns, Toll-like receptor signaling and NALP3 inflammasome activation. Acting alone or in concert, these events generate chronic inflammation, periprosthetic bone loss and decreased osteointegration that ultimately leads to implant failure.
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 09/2011; 7(10):600-8. · 9.75 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteoclasts are resident cells of the bone that are primarily involved in the physiological and pathological remodeling of this tissue. Mature osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells that are generated from the fusion of circulating precursors originating from the monocyte/macrophage lineage. During inflammatory bone conditions in vivo, de novo osteoclastogenesis is observed but it is currently unknown whether, besides increased osteoclast differentiation from undifferentiated precursors, other cell types can generate a multinucleated giant cell phenotype with bone resorbing activity. In this study, an animal model of calvaria-induced aseptic osteolysis was used to analyze possible bone resorption capabilities of dendritic cells (DCs). We determined by FACS analysis and confocal microscopy that injected GFP-labeled immature DCs were readily recruited to the site of osteolysis. Upon recruitment, the cathepsin K-positive DCs were observed in bone-resorbing pits. Additionally, chromosomal painting identified nuclei from female DCs, previously injected into a male recipient, among the nuclei of giant cells at sites of osteolysis. Finally, osteolysis was also observed upon recruitment of CD11c-GFP conventional DCs in Csf1r(-/-) mice, which exhibit a severe depletion of resident osteoclasts and tissue macrophages. Altogether, our analysis indicates that DCs may have an important role in bone resorption associated with various inflammatory diseases.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2010; 185(3):1485-91. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene is widely used as a bearing surface in prosthetic arthroplasty. Over time the generation of implant-derived wear particles can initiate an inflammatory reaction characterized by periprosthetic inflammation and ultimately bone resorption at the prosthetic bone interface. Herein we present evidence that the different sized particles as well as the different length alkane polymers generated by implant wear leads to a two component inflammatory response. Polymeric alkane structures, with side chain oxidations, directly bind and activate the TLR-1/2 signaling pathway. Whereas micron- and nanometer-sized particulate debris are extensively phagocyted and induce enlargement, fusion and disruption of endosomal compartments. The resulting lysosomal damage and subsequent enzymatic leakage induces the NALP3 inflammasome activation as determined by cathepsins S and B cytosolic release, Caspase 1 activation and processing of pro-IL-1beta, and pro-IL-18. These two processes synergistically results in the initiation of a strong inflammatory response with consequent cellular necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation.
    Molecular Immunology 10/2009; 47(2-3):175-84. · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the advancement of biomedical technology, artificial materials have been developed to replace diseased, damaged or nonfunctional body parts. Among such materials, ultra high molecular weight alkane or modified alkyl polymers have been extensively used in heart valves, stents, pacemakers, ear implants, as well as total joint replacement devices. Although much research has been undertaken to design the most non-reactive biologically inert polyethylene derivatives, strong inflammatory responses followed by rejection and failure of the implant have been noted. Purification of the alkane polymers from the site of inflammation revealed extensive "in vivo" oxidation as detected by fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Herein, we report the novel observation that oxidized alkane polymers induced activation of TLR1/2 pathway as determined by ligand dependent changes in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity and NF-kappaB luciferase gene assays. Oxidized polymers were very effective in activating dendritic cells and inducing secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Molecular docking of the oxidized alkanes designated ligand specificity and polymeric conformations fitting into the TLR1/2 binding grooves. This is the first report of a synthetic polymer activating immune responses through TLR binding.
    PLoS ONE 02/2008; 3(6):e2438. · 3.73 Impact Factor