Anthony D So

Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

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Publications (15)160.85 Total impact

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    Anthony D So, Tejen A Shah
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.
    Upsala journal of medical sciences 03/2014; · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex and include human behaviour at many levels of society; the consequences affect everybody in the world. Similarities with climate change are evident. Many efforts have been made to describe the many different facets of antibiotic resistance and the interventions needed to meet the challenge. However, coordinated action is largely absent, especially at the political level, both nationally and internationally. Antibiotics paved the way for unprecedented medical and societal developments, and are today indispensible in all health systems. Achievements in modern medicine, such as major surgery, organ transplantation, treatment of preterm babies, and cancer chemotherapy, which we today take for granted, would not be possible without access to effective treatment for bacterial infections. Within just a few years, we might be faced with dire setbacks, medically, socially, and economically, unless real and unprecedented global coordinated actions are immediately taken. Here, we describe the global situation of antibiotic resistance, its major causes and consequences, and identify key areas in which action is urgently needed.
    The Lancet Infectious Diseases 11/2013; · 19.97 Impact Factor
  • BMJ (online) 04/2012; 344:e1782. · 17.22 Impact Factor
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    Anthony D So, Quentin Ruiz-Esparza
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    ABSTRACT: Enabling innovation and access to health technologies remains a key strategy in combating infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, a gulf between paying markets and the endemicity of such diseases has contributed to the dearth of R&D in meeting these public health needs. While the pharmaceutical industry views emerging economies as potential new markets, most of the world's poorest bottom billion now reside in middle-income countries--a fact that has complicated tiered access arrangements. However, product development partnerships--particularly those involving academic institutions and small firms--find commercial opportunities in pursuing even neglected diseases; and a growing pharmaceutical sector in BRICS countries offers hope for an indigenous base of innovation. Such innovation will be shaped by 1) access to building blocks of knowledge; 2) strategic use of intellectual property and innovative financing to meet public health goals; 3) collaborative norms of open innovation; and 4) alternative business models, some with a double bottom line. Facing such resource constraints, LMICs are poised to develop a new, more resource-effective model of innovation that holds exciting promise in meeting the needs of global health.
    Infectious diseases of poverty. 01/2012; 1(1):2.
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    ABSTRACT: In the face of a growing global burden of resistance to existing antibiotics, a combination of scientific and economic challenges has posed significant barriers to the development of novel antibacterials over the past few decades. Yet the bottlenecks at each stage of the pharmaceutical value chain-from discovery to post-marketing-present opportunities to reengineer an innovation pipeline that has fallen short. The upstream hurdles to lead identification and optimization may be eased with greater multi-sectoral collaboration, a growing array of alternatives to high-throughput screening, and the application of open source approaches. Product development partnerships and South-South innovation platforms have shown promise in bolstering the R&D efforts to tackle neglected diseases. Strategies that delink product sales from the firms' return on investment can help ensure that the twin goals of innovation and access are met. To effect these changes, both public and private sector stakeholders must show greater commitment to an R&D agenda that will address this problem, not only for industrialized countries but also globally.
    Drug resistance updates: reviews and commentaries in antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapy 03/2011; 14(2):88-94. · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two commercial databases (Pharmaprojects and Adis Insight R&D) were queried for antibacterial agents in clinical development. Particular attention was given to antibacterial agents for systemic administration. For each agent, reviewers were requested to indicate whether its spectrum of activity covered a set of selected multidrug-resistant bacteria, and whether it had a new mechanism of action or a new target. In addition, PubMed was searched for antibacterial agents in development that appeared in review articles. Out of 90 agents that were considered to fulfil the inclusion criteria for the analysis, 66 were new active substances. Fifteen of these could be systemically administered and were assessed as acting via a new or possibly new mechanism of action or on a new or possibly new target. Out of these, 12 agents were assessed as having documented in vitro activity against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria and only four had documented in vitro activity against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Of these four, two acted on new or possibly new targets and, crucially, none acted via new mechanisms of action. There is an urgent need to address the lack of effective treatments to meet the increasing public health burden caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, in particular against Gram-negative bacteria.
    Drug resistance updates: reviews and commentaries in antimicrobial and anticancer chemotherapy 03/2011; 14(2):118-24. · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    Anthony D So, Neha Gupta, Otto Cars
    BMJ (online) 05/2010; 340:c2071. · 17.22 Impact Factor
  • Anthony D So, Neha Gupta, Otto Cars
    BMJ Clinical Research 01/2010; 340(7756):1091-1092. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hospitals engaged in medical tourism can turn crisis into opportunity
    BMJ (online) 01/2010; 341:c5116. · 17.22 Impact Factor
  • BMJ Clinical Research 01/2010; 341(7774):615-616. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The US Bayh-Dole Act encourages university patenting of inventions arising from publicly funded research. Lessons from three decades of US experience serve as a cautionary tale for those countries that may choose to emulate Bayh-Dole.
    PLoS Biology 11/2008; 6(10):e262. · 12.69 Impact Factor
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    BMJ (online) 02/2008; 337:a1438. · 17.22 Impact Factor
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    Anthony D So
    Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 12/2004; 82(11):813. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, countries from China and Brazil to Malaysia and South Africa have passed laws promoting the patenting of publicly funded research, and a similar proposal is under legislative consideration in India. These initiatives are modeled in part on the United States Bayh-Dole Act of 1980. Bayh-Dole (BD) encouraged American universities to acquire patents on inventions resulting from government-funded research and to issue exclusive licenses to private firms, on the assumption that exclusive licensing creates incentives to commercialize these inventions. A broader hope of BD, and the initiatives emulating it, was that patenting and licensing of public sector research would spur science-based economic growth as well as national competitiveness. And while it was not an explicit goal of BD, some of the emulation initiatives also aim to generate revenues for public sector research institutions. We believe government-supported research should be managed in the public interest. We also believe that some of the claims favoring BD-type initiatives overstate the Act’s contributions to growth in US innovation. Important concerns and safeguards—learned from nearly 30 years of experience in the US—have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, both patent law and science have changed considerably since BD was adopted in 1980. Other countries seeking to emulate that legislation need to consider this new context.
    Faculty Scholarship.
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