Pal Demeter

Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Budapeŝto, Budapest, Hungary

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Publications (11)20.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, a significant number of IBD patients fail to comply with treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-adherence and the use of CAM in Hungarian patients with IBD. A total of 655 consecutive IBD patients (CD: 344, age: 38.2 [SD 12.9]years; UC: 311, age: 44.9 [15.3]years) were interviewed during the specialist visit by self-administered questionnaire including demographic and disease-related data as well as items analyzing the extent of non-adherence and CAM use. Patients taking more than 80% of each prescribed medication were classified as adherent. The overall rate of self-reported non-adherence (CD: 20.9%, UC: 20.6%) and CAM (CD: 31.7%, UC: 30.9%) use did not differ between Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The most common causes of non-adherence were: forgetfulness (47.8%), too many/unnecessary pills (39.7%), being afraid of side effects (27.9%) and too frequent dosing. Most common forms of CAM were herbal tea (47.3%), homeopathy (14.6%), special diet (12.2%), and acupuncture (5.8%). In CD, disease duration, date of last follow-up visit, educational level and previous surgeries were predicting factors for non-adherence. Alternative medicine use was associated in both diseases with younger age, higher educational level, and immunosuppressant use. In addition, CAM use in UC was more common in females and in patients with supportive psychiatric/psychological therapy. Non-adherence and CAM use is common in patients with IBD. Special attention should be paid to explore the identified predictive factors during follow-up visits to improve adherence to therapy and improving patient-doctor relationship.
    Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 09/2010; 4(3):283-90. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, a significant number of IBD patients fail to comply with treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-adherence the use of CAM in Hungarian patients with IBD. A total of 655 consecutive IBD patients (Crohn's disease [CD]: 344, age: 38.2 + or - 12.9 years; ulcerative colitis [UC]: 311, age: 44.9 + or - 15.3 years) were interviewed during the visit at specialists by self-administered questionnaire including demographic and disease-related data, as well as items analyzing the extent of non-adherence and CAM use. Patients taking more then 80% of each prescribed medicine were classified as adherent. The overall rate of self reported non-adherence (CD: 20.9%, UC: 20.6%) and CAM (CD: 31.7%, UC: 30.9%) use was not different between CD and UC. The most common causes of non-adherence were: forgetfulness (47.8%), too many/unnecessary pills (39.7%), being afraid of side effects (27.9%) and too frequent dosing. Most common forms of CAM were herbal tee (47.3%), homeopathy (14.6%), special diet (12.2%), and acupuncture (5.8%). In CD, disease duration, date of last follow-up visit, educational level and previous surgeries were predicting factors for non-adherence. Alternative medicine use was associated in both diseases with younger age, higher educational level and immunosuppressant use. In addition, CAM use in UC was more common in females and in patients with supportive psychiatric/psychological therapy. Non-adherence and CAM use is common in patients with IBD. Special attention should be paid to explore the identified predictive factors during follow-up visits to improve adherence to therapy and improving patient-doctor relationship.
    Orvosi Hetilap 02/2010; 151(7):250-8.
  • Journal of Crohns & Colitis - J CROHNS COLITIS. 01/2009; 3(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The primary aim of this study was to measure psychological distress, pain severity, health related quality of life (QOL) and pain coping strategies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and ulcerative colitis (UC). A second aim was to determine the influence of somatic and psychological variables on health related QOL. Eighty-eight IBS and 66 UC patients completed the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life Questionnaire (IBSQOL), Pain Severity Scale of West Haven Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPY), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) and Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ). T-tests and GLM Analysis of Covariance were used for statistical analysis. IBS patients had significantly higher levels of psychological distress, pain severity and maladaptive pain coping strategies (catastrophization), and lower QOL than UC patients. Variance of QOL in IBS was explained for the most part by catastrophization (15%), then by psychological distress (8%), and for the less part by pain severity (5%). In UC, pain severity explained 21%, psychological distress 8%, and catastrophization 3% of the variance of QOL. These results suggest there are differences between IBS and UC patients in the role of physical and psychological factors in QOL and emphasize the importance of cognitive processes in IBS.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings 01/2009; 15(4):287-95. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Production of histamine in colon tumours has been described earlier. Histamine-mediated signals have been shown to be implicated in tumour growth, and the effects of histamine are largely determined locally by the histamine receptor expression pattern. We analysed histamine receptor expression in human colorectal cancer, adenoma and normal mucosa by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot analysis and immunostaining. Real-time RT-PCR results revealed significantly decreased (p<0.001) H1R and H4R mRNA levels in tumours compared to normal colonic mucosa, without any significant change in H2R mRNA expression. H3R was absent in most samples; it was detected at low levels in 7.9% of the cases. Protein analysis showed a similar decrease in histamine receptor expression in carcinoma and adenoma compared to normal mucosa controls. Based on these results, we performed further Western blot analysis on Dukes-classified and -selected tumour samples. We found significantly decreased H4R levels in neoplastic samples compared to normal colonic tissue, but there was no significant correlation between histamine receptor expression profile and the Dukes stage of tumours. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression patterns of H1R, H2R and H4R similar to those suggested by the mRNA and Western blot results. In the present study, we demonstrate that H1R, H2R and H4R are expressed in colon carcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa. The results suggest a dramatic alteration in the distribution of histamine receptors in colon cancer. These findings raise the perspective of targeted pharmacological studies with selective histamine receptor antagonists or agonists in the therapy of colorectal tumours.
    European Journal of Cell Biology 04/2008; 87(4):227-36. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NOD1/CARD4, a member of the pattern-recognition receptor family, is a perfect candidate as a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease. Since only limited and conflicting data are available on G796A polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease patients, we set out to study the effect of this polymorphism on the susceptibility and course of Crohn's disease in the Hungarian population. Four hundred thirty-four unrelated Crohn's disease patients (age at presentation: 28.6+/-9.6 years, female/male: 210/224, duration of Crohn's disease: 8.2+/-6.9 years) and 200 healthy subjects (blood donors) and 136 non-inflammatory bowel disease gastrointestinal controls with chronic gastritis were investigated. NOD1 G796A was detected by using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. Detailed clinical phenotypes were determined by reviewing the medical charts. The frequencies of the variant alleles of NOD1 G796A differed significantly between the Crohn's disease patients and both healthy (GG 49.5% vs. 67%; AG 41.5% vs. 28%; and AA 9.0% vs. 5.2%; p<0.0001) and non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with chronic gastritis. Carriage of the single nucleotide polymorphism of NOD1 G796A proved to be a highly significant risk factor for Crohn's disease compared to both healthy (p<0.0001, OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.5-2.9) and non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with chronic gastritis (p=0.008). Significant associations were not found between the different genotypes and the demographic data on the patients or the clinical characteristics of Crohn's disease. The different polymorphisms of pattern-recognition receptors (e.g. NOD2/CARD15 SNP8, SNP12 and SNP13 mutations, the TLR4 D299G polymorphism and NOD1 G796A) did not reveal a mutual basis. Our results suggest that carriage of the NOD1 G796A mutation increases susceptibility for Crohn's disease in the Hungarian population.
    Digestive and Liver Disease 01/2008; 39(12):1064-70. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MDR1 (ABCB1), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, is an attractive candidate gene for the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and perhaps for response to therapy. Since limited data are available on MDR1 and ABCG2 polymorphisms in East European IBD patients, the aim of this study was to investigate ABCG2 and MDR1 variants and responses to medical therapy and/or disease phenotype in Hungarian patients. A total of 414 unrelated IBD patients (Crohn's disease (CD): 265, age: 35.2+/-12.1 years, duration: 8.7+/-7.6 years and ulcerative colitis (UC): 149, age: 44.4+/-15.4 years, duration: 10.7+/-8.9 years) and 149 healthy subjects were investigated. ABCG2 G34A, C421A and MDR1 C3435T, G2677T/A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detailed clinical phenotypes were determined by reviewing the medical charts. The frequency of the ABCG2 and MDR1 SNPs was not significantly different among IBD, CD, UC patients and controls. There was no difference in risk for steroid resistance in CD patients carrying variant ABCG2 (19.6% versus non-carriers 18.4%, p=NS) or MDR1 3435T (CC: 22.2% versus CT/TT: 17.6%) alleles. In addition, carriage of the variant allele was not associated with disease phenotype, presence of extra-intestinal manifestations, smoking, response to infliximab therapy or the need for surgery. In UC, the carriage of variant ABCG2 alleles seemed to be preventive for arthritis (15.5% versus 31.7%, OR: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.16-0.98). MDR1 and ABCG2 SNPs were not associated with disease susceptibility or disease phenotype in Hungarian patients, and variant alleles did not predict the response to medical therapy or the need for surgery. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between the presence of ABCG2 variants and arthritis in UC.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 07/2007; 42(6):726-33. · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Functional differences and association with inflammatory disorders were found relating to three major haptoglobin (Hp) phenotypes. Our aim was to investigate Hp polymorphisms in Hungarian patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Four hundred sixty-eight CD patients and 384 healthy controls were examined. Hp phenotypes were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of the sera. The frequency of the Hp(1) allele was significantly higher in CD (0.395; OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.02-1.52; P=0.03) compared to controls (0.345). In CD, Hp phenotype was associated with disease behavior (OR [Hp(2-1) vs other], 2.06; 95% CI, 1.29-3.28 for inflammatory behavior). Furthermore, an increased frequency of primary sclerosing cholangitis was observed in the Hp 2-2 compared to the Hp 1-1 phenotype (6.5% vs. 0.0%; P=0.039). We conclude that the Hp polymorphism is associated with CD, inflammatory disease behavior, and primary sclerosing cholangitis in Hungarian patients. Further studies are required to evaluate the significance of Hp polymorphisms in other populations from geographically diverse regions.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 06/2007; 52(5):1279-84. · 2.26 Impact Factor
  • Zeitschrift Fur Gastroenterologie - Z GASTROENTEROL. 01/2007; 45(05).
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    ABSTRACT: Since functional differences were found among three major haptoglobin phenotypes, haptoglobin polymorphism was reported to be associated with the risk and clinical course of different inflammatory diseases. The aim of the study was to investigate the Hp polymorphism distribution in Hungarian Crohn's disease patients. 511 Hungarian IBD patients were investigated (Crohn's disease patients: 468, m/f ratio: 233/235, duration 8.2 +/- 6.7 ys, and ulcerative colitis patients: 43, m/f: 22/21, duration: 9.5 +/- 10.6 ys) and 384 healthy subjects served as controls. Hp phenotypes were determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of sera followed by immunoblotting. Clinical data were come by the questionnaires prepared by the physicians. The frequency of haptoglobin-1 allele was significantly higher in Crohn's disease (0.395) compared to the controls (0.345; OR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.02-1.52, p = 0.03), but the phenotype distribution showed no such differences. Haptoglobin phenotype was associated to disease behavior in Crohn's disease (B1 and B2, in haptoglobin 1-1 and 2-2: 36.6%-34.3% and 32.4%-32.5% vs. in 2-1: 44.9% and 20.3%; ORB1Hp2-1 vs. others: 2.06, 95%CI: 1.29-3.28). Furthermore, an increased frequency of primary sclerosing cholangitis was observed in haptoglobin 2-2, compared to the 1-1 (6.5% vs. 0.0%, p = 0.039). No associations were found in ulcerative colitis. haptoglobin-1 allele was associated with Crohn's disease, whereas the phenotypes with the disease behavior and frequency of primary sclerosing cholangitis, exhibiting a disease-modifying effect.
    Orvosi Hetilap 10/2006; 147(36):1745-50.
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    ABSTRACT: Recent data suggest that haplotypic variants of the DLG5 gene on 10q23 are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Germany. In view of the geographical differences in frequency of genetic markers and the absence of data in Central European patients, our aim was to determine the DLG5 R30Q variant in Hungarian IBD patients. We investigated 773 unrelated IBD patients (age 38.1 +/- 10.3 years; duration, 8.8 +/- 7.5 years; Crohn's disease [CD]: 639; male/female, 309/330; duration, 8.4 +/- 7.1 years; ulcerative colitis [UC]: 134; male/female, 63/71; duration, 10.6 +/- 8.9 years) and 150 healthy subjects. DLG5 R30Q and TLR4 D299G variants were tested by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism. DNA was screened for NOD2/CARD15 mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Detailed clinical phenotype was determined by reviewing the medical charts. The frequency of the R30Q variant allele was not significantly different in IBD (22.0%), CD (20.8%), and UC (27.6%) patients compared with healthy control subjects (28.0%). In CD, the 113A variant allele was associated with steroid resistance (16.3% vs noncarriers, 7.6%; odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% CI 1.3-4.5; P = 0.013). In a logistic regression model carriage of DLG5 R30Q, perianal involvement and frequent relapses were independently associated with steroid resistance. No phenotype-genotype associations were found in UC patients, although a trend toward more extensive disease was observed in carriers of the variant allele (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 0.95-4.4; P = 0.07). The present data strongly contrast previous data from Germany. DLG5 113A is not associated with disease susceptibility, but there was a tendency for this allele to confer resistance to steroids. Further studies are required to evaluate the significance of DLG5 in other populations from geographically diverse regions.
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 06/2006; 12(5):362-8. · 5.12 Impact Factor