Are you Iliyana Skorcheva?

Claim your profile

Publications (2)6.19 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: T helper (Th) 17 cells have recently been implicated in psoriasis pathogenesis, but mechanisms of how these cells traffic into inflamed skin are unknown. By immunostaining for interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-22, we show numerous cells present in psoriasis lesions that produce these cytokines. We next found that Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-22, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) markedly increased the expression of CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 20, a CC chemokine receptor (CCR)6 ligand, in human keratinocyte monolayer and raft cultures in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed in mice that subcutaneous injection with recombinant IL-17A, IL-22, or TNF-alpha led to the upregulation of both CCL20 and CCR6 expression in skin as well as cutaneous T-cell infiltration. Taken together, these data show that Th17 cytokines stimulate CCL20 production in vitro and in vivo, and thus provide a potential explanation of how CCR6-positive Th17 cells maintain their continual presence in psoriasis through a positive chemotactic feedback loop.
    Journal of Investigative Dermatology 04/2009; 129(9):2175-83. · 6.19 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: T helper (Th) 17 cells, a novel T-cell subset, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interleukin (IL)-23 stimulates survival and proliferation of Th17 cells, and thus serves as a key master cytokine regulator for these diseases. In psoriasis, IL-23 is overproduced by dendritic cells and keratinocytes, and this cytokine stimulates Th17 cells within dermis to make IL-17A and IL-22. IL-22, in particular, drives keratinocyte hyperproliferation in psoriasis. Future targeting of these key cytokines is likely to lead to dramatic clinical improvement in patients with psoriasis. This review focuses on the numerous recent studies on the roles of IL-23 and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.
    Current Rheumatology Reports 01/2008; 9(6):461-7.