T. F. Mentel

Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (115)229.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We describe a novel inlet that allows measurement of both gas and particle molecular composition when coupled to mass spectrometric, chromatographic, or optical sensors: the Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO). The design goals for the FIGAERO are to allow unperturbed observation of ambient air while simultaneously analyzing gases and collecting particulate matter on a Teflon® (hereafter Teflon) filter via an entirely separate sampling port. The filter is analyzed periodically by the same sensor on hourly or faster timescales using temperature-programmed thermal desorption. We assess the performance of the FIGAERO by coupling it to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) in laboratory chamber studies of α-pinene oxidation and field measurements at a boreal forest location. Low instrument backgrounds give detection limits of ppt or lower for compounds in the gas-phase and in the picogram m-3 range for particle phase compounds. The FIGAERO-HRToF-CIMS provides molecular information about both gases and particle composition on the 1 Hz and hourly timescales, respectively for hundreds of compounds. The FIGAERO thermal desorptions are highly reproducible (better than 10%), allowing a calibrated assessment of the effective volatility of desorbing compounds and the role of thermal decomposition during the desorption process. We show that the often multi-modal desorption thermograms arising from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) provide additional insights into molecular composition and/or particle morphology, and exhibit changes with changes in SOA formation or aging pathways.
    03/2014; 7(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The chemical and physical properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by the photochemical degradation of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) are yet poorly constrained. The evolution of the complex refractive index (RI) of SOA, formed from purely biogenic VOC and mixtures of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC was studied over a diurnal cycle in the SAPHIR photochemical outdoor chamber in Jülich, Germany. The correlation of RI with SOA chemical and physical properties such as oxidation level and volatility was examined. The RI was retrieved by a newly developed broadband cavity enhanced spectrometer for aerosol optical extinction measurements in the near UV spectral region (360 to 420 nm). Chemical composition and volatility of the particles were monitored by a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, and a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer. SOA was formed by ozonolysis of either (i) a mixture of biogenic VOC (α-pinene and limonene), (ii) biogenic VOC mixture with subsequent addition of an anthropogenic VOC (p-xylene-d10), or (iii) a mixture of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC. The SOA aged by ozone / OH reactions up to 29.5 h was found to be non-absorbing in all cases. The SOA with p-xylene-d10 showed an increase of the scattering component of the RI correlated with an increase of the O / C ratio and with an increase in the SOA density. There was a greater increase in the scattering component of the RI when the SOA was produced from the mixture of biogenic VOCs and anthropogenic VOC than from the sequential addition of the VOCs after the approximate same ageing time. The increase of the scattering component was inversely correlated with the SOA volatility. Two RI retrievals determined for the pure biogenic SOA showed a constant RI for up to 5 h of ageing. Mass spectral characterization shows the three types of the SOA formed in this study have significant amount of semivolatile components. The influence of anthropogenic VOCs on the oxygenated organic aerosol, and the atmospheric implications are discussed.
    01/2014; 14(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) on new particle formation (NPF) and on photochemical ozone production from real plant volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions was studied in a laboratory set up. At high NOx conditions (BVOC/NOx < 7, NOx > 23 ppb) no new particles were formed. Instead photochemical ozone formation was observed resulting in higher hydroxyl radical (OH) and lower nitrogen monoxide (NO) concentrations. As soon as [NO] was reduced to below 1 ppb by OH reactions, NPF was observed. Adding high amounts of NOx caused NPF orders of magnitude slower than in analogous experiments at low NOx conditions (NOx ~ 300 ppt), although OH concentrations were higher. Varying NO2 photolysis enabled showing that NO was responsible for suppression of NPF suggesting that peroxy radicals are involved in NPF. The rates of NPF and photochemical ozone production were related by power law dependence with an exponent of approximately -2. This exponent indicated that the overall peroxy radical concentration must have been the same whenever NPF appeared. Thus permutation reactions of first generation peroxy radicals cannot be the rate limiting step in NPF from monoterpene oxidation. It was concluded that permutation reactions of higher generation peroxy radical like molecules limit the rate of new particle formation. In contrast to the strong effects on the particle numbers, the formation of particle mass was less sensitive to NOx concentrations, if at all. Only at very high NOx concentrations yields were reduced by about an order of magnitude.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 10/2013; 13(10):25827-25870. · 4.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic precursors has been studied exposing reaction mixtures to natural sunlight in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany. In this study aromatic compounds served as examples of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) and a mixture of α-pinene and limonene as an example for biogenic VOC. Several experiments with exclusively aromatic precursors were performed to establish a relationship between yield and organic aerosol mass loading for the atmospheric relevant range of aerosol loads of 0.01 to 10 μg m−3. The yields (0.5 to 9%) were comparable to previous data and further used for the detailed evaluation of the mixed biogenic and anthropogenic experiments. For the mixed experiments a number of different oxidation schemes were addressed. The reactivity, the sequence of addition, and the amount of the precursors influenced the SOA properties. Monoterpene oxidation products, including carboxylic acids and dimer esters were identified in the aged aerosol at levels comparable to ambient air. OH radicals were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence, which allowed for establishing relations of aerosol properties and composition to the experimental OH dose. Furthermore, the OH measurements in combination with the derived yields for aromatic SOA enabled application of a simplified model to calculate the chemical turnover of the aromatic precursor and corresponding anthropogenic contribution to the mixed aerosol. The estimated anthropogenic contributions were ranging from small (&approx;8%) up to significant fraction (>50%) providing a suitable range to study the effect of aerosol composition on the aerosol volatility (volume fraction remaining (VFR) at 343 K: 0.86–0.94). The aromatic aerosol had higher oxygen to carbon ratio O/C and was less volatile than the biogenic fraction. However, in order to produce significant amount of aromatic SOA the reaction mixtures needed a higher OH dose that also increased O/C and provided a less volatile aerosol. The SOA yields, O/C, and f44 (the mass fraction of CO2+ ions in the mass spectra which can be considered as a measure of carboxylic groups) in the mixed photo-chemical experiments could be described as linear combinations of the corresponding properties of the pure systems. For VFR there was in addition an enhancement effect, making the mixed aerosol significantly less volatile than what could be predicted from the pure systems. A strong positive correlation was found between changes in volatility and O/C with the exception during dark hours where the SOA volatility decreased while O/C did not change significantly. Thus, this change in volatility under dark conditions as well as the anthropogenic enhancement is due to chemical or morphological changes not affecting O/C.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 03/2013; 2013(13):2837-2855. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atmospheric aerosols impact climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as ice and cloud condensation nuclei. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) comprise an important component of atmospheric aerosols. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by vegetation are a major source of SOA. Pathogens and insect attacks, heat waves and droughts can induce stress to plants that may impact their BVOC emissions, and hence the yield and type of formed SOA, and possibly their climatic effects. This raises questions whether stress-induced changes in SOA formation may attenuate or amplify effects of climate change. In this study we assess the potential impact of stress-induced BVOC emissions on SOA formation for tree species typical for mixed deciduous and Boreal Eurasian forests. We studied the photochemical SOA formation for infested plants in a laboratory setup under well-controlled conditions and applied in addition heat and drought stress. The results indicate that stress conditions substantially modify SOA formation. While sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate, and C17-BVOC increase SOA yield, green leaf volatiles suppress SOA formation. By classifying emission types, stressors and SOA formation potential, we propose possible climatic feedbacks regarding aerosol effects. We conclude that stress situations for plants due to climate change should be considered in climate-vegetation feedback mechanisms.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 03/2013; 13(3):7463-7502. · 4.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The formation of Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was simulated with the Secondary ORGanic Aerosol Model (SORGAM) by a classical gas-particle partitioning concept, using the two-product model approach, which is widely used in chemical transport models. In this study, we extensively updated SORGAM including three major modifications: firstly, we derived temperature dependence functions of the SOA yields for aromatics and biogenic VOCs, based on recent chamber studies within a sophisticated mathematic optimization framework; secondly, we implemented the SOA formation pathways from photo oxidation (OH initiated) of isoprene; thirdly, we implemented the SOA formation channel from NO3-initiated oxidation of reactive biogenic hydrocarbons (isoprene and monoterpenes). The temperature dependence functions of the SOA yields were validated against available chamber experiments. Moreover, the whole updated SORGAM module was validated against ambient SOA observations represented by the summed oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) concentrations abstracted from Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) measurements at a rural site near Rotterdam, the Netherlands, performed during the IMPACT campaign in May 2008. In this case, we embedded both the original and the updated SORGAM module into the EURopean Air pollution and Dispersion-Inverse Model (EURAD-IM), which showed general good agreements with the observed meteorological parameters and several secondary products such as O3, sulfate and nitrate. With the updated SORGAM module, the EURAD-IM model also captured the observed SOA concentrations reasonably well especially those during nighttime. In contrast, the EURAD-IM model before update underestimated the observations by a factor of up to 5. The large improvements of the modeled SOA concentrations by updated SORGAM were attributed to the mentioned three modifications. Embedding the temperature dependence functions of the SOA yields, including the new pathways from isoprene photo oxidations, and switching on the SOA formation from NO3 initiated biogenic VOCs oxidations contributed to this enhancement by 10%, 22% and 47%, respectively. However, the EURAD-IM model with updated SORGAM still clearly underestimated the afternoon SOA observations up to a factor of two. More work such as to improve the simulated OH concentrations under high VOCs and low NOx concentrations, further including the SOA formation from semi-volatile organic compounds, the correct aging process of aerosols, oligomerization process and the influence on the biogenic SOA by the anthropogenic SOA, are still required to fill the gap.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 03/2013; 13(3):5961-6005. · 4.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Climate change will induce extended heat waves to parts of the vegetation more frequently. High temperatures may act as stress (thermal stress) on plants changing emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). As BVOCs impact the atmospheric oxidation cycle and aerosol formation, it is important to explore possible alterations of BVOC emissions under high temperature conditions. Applying heat to European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce in a laboratory setup either caused the well-known exponential increases of BVOC emissions or induced irreversible changes of BVOC emissions. Considering only irreversible changes of BVOC emissions as stress impacts, we found that high temperatures decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. This behaviour was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions were constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, application of thermal stress to conifers amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers and induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. In particular during insect attack on conifers, the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs, which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat-induced decrease of de novo emissions was larger than the increased monoterpene release caused by damage of resin ducts. For insect-infested conifers the net effect of thermal stress on BVOC emissions could be an overall decrease. Global change-induced heat waves may put hard thermal stress on plants. If so, we project that BVOC emissions increase is more than predicted by models only in areas predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOCs. Otherwise overall effects of high temperature stress will be lower increases of BVOC emissions than predicted by algorithms that do not consider stress impacts.
    Biogeosciences 12/2012; 9(12):5111-5123. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from European beech, Palestine oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce exposed to heat stress were measured in a laboratory setup. In general, heat stress decreased the de novo emissions of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Decreasing emission strength with heat stress was independent of the tree species and whether the de novo emissions being constitutive or induced by biotic stress. In contrast, heat stress induced emissions of green leaf volatiles. It also amplified the release of monoterpenes stored in resin ducts of conifers probably due to heat-induced damage of these resin ducts. The increased release of monoterpenes could be strong and long lasting. But, despite of such strong monoterpene emission pulses, the net effect of heat stress on BVOC emissions from conifers can be an overall decrease. In particular during insect attack on conifers the plants showed de novo emissions of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC which exceeded constitutive monoterpene emissions from pools. The heat stress induced decrease of these de novo emissions was larger than the increased release caused by damage of resin ducts. We project that global change induced heat waves may cause increased BVOC emissions only in cases where the respective areas are predominantly covered with conifers that do not emit high amounts of sesquiterpenes and phenolic BVOC. Otherwise the overall effect of heat stress will be a decrease in BVOC emissions.
    Biogeosciences Discussions 07/2012; 9(7):9533-9570.
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    ABSTRACT: High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and growth may be important and needs to be explored in more detail in the future.
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 06/2012; 12(11):5113-5127. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements in-cluding both filter sampling (PM 1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line con-centrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic func-tional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed sepa-rately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrome-ter organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group com-positions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxi-dized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organ-ics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic back-bones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, con-tributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investi-gations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral pro-files obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR factor associated with western air masses was linked to biogenic marine sources, and was enriched in low-molecular weight aliphatic amines. Such findings provide evidence of at least two independent sources originating biogenic organic aerosols in Hyytiälä by oxida-tion and condensation mechanisms: reactive terpenes emit-ted by the boreal forest and compounds of marine origin, with the latter relatively more important when predominantly polar air masses reach the site. This study is an example of how spectroscopic techniques, such as proton NMR, can add functional group specificity for certain chemical features (like aromatics) of OA with respect to AMS. They can therefore be profitably exploited to com-plement aerosol mass spectrometric measurements in organic source apportionment studies.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 02/2012; 12:941-959. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night during spring and summer in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C105H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and growth may be important and needs to be explored in more detail in the future.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 02/2012; 12(2):4589-4625. · 4.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Observations of aerosol chemical composition in Cabauw, the Netherlands, are presented for two intensive measurement periods in May 2008 and March 2009. Sub-micron aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and is compared to observations from aerosol size distribution measurements as well as composition measurements with a Monitor for AeRosol and GAses (MARGA) based instrument and a Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS). An overview of the data is presented and the data quality is discussed. In May 2008 enhanced pollution was observed with organics contributing 40% to the PM1 mass. In contrast the observed average mass loading was lower in March 2009 and a dominance of ammonium nitrate (42%) was observed. The semi-volatile nature of ammonium nitrate is evident in the diurnal cycles with maximum concentrations observed in the morning hours in May 2008 and little diurnal variation observed in March 2009. Size dependent composition data from AMS measurements are presented and show a dominance of organics in the size range below 200 nm. A higher O:C ratio of the organics is observed for May 2008 than for March 2009. Together with the time series of individual tracer ions this shows the dominance of OOA over HOA in May 2008
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 01/2012; 12:4723-4742. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS) and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known and very low volatile α-pinene SOA product, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 01/2012; 12(3):1483-1496. · 5.51 Impact Factor
  • 2012 NOSA Aerosol Symposium, Helsingør, Denmark, 15-16 November; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: N2O5 detection in the atmosphere has been accomplished using techniques which have been developed during the last decade. Most techniques use a heated inlet to thermally decompose N2O5 to NO3, which can be detected by either cavity based absorption at 662 nm or by laser-induced fluorescence. In summer 2007, a large set of instruments, which were capable of measuring NO3 mixing ratios, were simultaneously deployed in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. Some of these instruments measured N2O5 mixing ratios either simultaneously or alternatively. Experiments focused on the investigation of potential interferences from, e.g., water vapour or aerosol and on the investigation of the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds by NO3. The comparison of N2O5 mixing ratios shows an excellent agreement between measurements of instruments applying different techniques (3 cavity ring-down (CRDS) instruments, 2 laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments). Datasets are highly correlated as indicated by the square of the linear correlation coefficients, R2, which values were larger than 0.96 for the entire datasets. N2O5 mixing ratios well agree within the combined accuracy of measurements. Slopes of the linear regression range between 0.87 and 1.26 and intercepts are negligible. The most critical aspect of N2O5 measurements by cavity ring-down instruments is the determination of the inlet and filter transmission efficiency. Measurements here show that the N2O5 inlet transmission efficiency can decrease in the presence of high aerosol loads, and that frequent filter/inlet changing is necessary to quantitatively sample N2O5 in some environments. The analysis of data also demonstrates that a general correction for degrading filter transmission is not applicable for all conditions encountered during this campaign. Besides the effect of a gradual degradation of the inlet transmission efficiency aerosol exposure, no other interference for N2O5 measurements is found.
    Atmos. Meas. Tech. 01/2012; 5:2763-2777.
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    ABSTRACT: Humic-like substances (HULIS) constitute a significant fraction of aerosol particles in different environments. Studies of the role of HULIS in hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosol particles are scarce, and results differ significantly. In this work the hygroscopic growth and CCN activity of water extracts (WE) and HULIS extracted from particulate matter (PM) collected at a polluted urban site (Copenhagen, Denmark), a rural site (Melpitz, Germany) and the remote site Storm Peak Laboratory (Colorado, USA) were investigated. Measurements of inorganic ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) within the PM confirmed that the sources of aerosol particles most likely differed for the three samples. The hygroscopic properties of the filtered WE were characterized by hygroscopicity parameters for subsaturated conditions (k(GF)) of 0.25, 0.41 and 0.22, and for supersaturated conditions k(CCN) were 0.23, 0.29 and 0.22 respectively for the urban, rural and remote WE samples. The measured hygroscopic growth and CCN activity were almost identical for the three HULIS samples and could be well represented by k(GF) = 0.07 and k(CCN) = 0.08-0.10 respectively. Small amounts of inorganic ions were present in the HULIS samples so the actual values for pure HULIS are expected to be slightly lower (k(GF)({*}) = 0.04-0.06 and k(CCN)({*}) = 0.07-0.08). The HULIS samples are thus less hygroscopic compared to most previous studies. To aid direct comparison of hygroscopic properties of HULIS from different studies, we recommend that the fraction of inorganic species in the HULIS samples always is measured and reported.
    Journal of Geophysical Research 01/2012; 117(D22). · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Within the framework of the international cloud experiment "Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010" (HCCT-2010), the influence of cloud processing on the activation properties of ambient aerosol particles was investigated. Particles were probed up- and downwind of an orographic cap cloud on Mt. Schmücke, which is part of a large mountain ridge in Thuringia, Germany. The activation properties of the particles were investigated by means of size-segregated Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) measurements at 3 to 4 different supersaturations. The observed CCN spectra together with the total particle spectra were used to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter κ for the up- and the downwind stations. The up- and downwind critical diameters and κ values were then compared for defined Cloud Events and Non Cloud Events. Cloud processing was found to significantly increase the hygroscopicity of the aerosol particles, with an average increase in κ of 50%. Mass spectrometry analysis and isotopic analysis of the particles show that the observed increase in hygroscopicity of the cloud-processed particles is due to an enrichment of nitrate and sulfate in the particle phase.
    16th International Conference on Clouds and Precipitation (ICCP), Leipzig, Germany, 30 July - 3 August; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) in isoprene emission-repressed plants (line RA22), respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.
    ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 12/2011; 12:1021-1030. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b) comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c) a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d) comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 12/2011; 11:13061-13143. · 4.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can scatter and absorb radiation. BVOC therefore indirectly impact the Earth's climate. Earth's climate is projected to change, possibly putting and vegetation under stress due to intensive heat and drought periods. Such stress situations will alter BVOC emissions that may induce feedbacks between vegetation and climate change. The main aim of our study is to determine whether such effect exists. A first step was to determine the impacts of drought and heat on BVOC emissions and subsequent SOA formation. Experiments were performed in the Juelich plant atmosphere chamber. Pine and Spruce were taken as representatives for species exhibiting storage organs for monoterpenes (MT). Beech and Birch were used as species with MT emissions closely coupled to CO2 uptake. The plants were stored under well-defined conditions of temperature and light intensity. Heat stress was induced by increasing the chamber temperature; drought stress was induced by not irrigating the plants. A fraction of the air leaving the plant chamber was fed into a reaction chamber where SOA formation was induced by OH-initiated oxidation. During stress situations the plants' BVOC emissions changed significantly. As a general feature we found that combined heat and drought stress increased MT emissions from conifers but decreased MT emissions from the broadleaf species. The former was attributed to a heat-induced breakdown of storage organs. The latter was attributed to a general breakdown of biosynthetic activity. SOA formation potentials were changed together with the MT emissions. The decrease in SOA formation potential due to the decrease of MT emissions from broadleaf species was amplified by additional emissions of green leaf volatiles (GLV). Obviously, GLV can suppress SOA formation by suppressing OH concentrations. GLV were also emitted from the conifers under heat stress. However the contribution of GLV to the BVOC mix was too low to suppress SOA formation significantly. Therefore, increases of MT emissions from heat stressed conifers followed by an increased SOA formation potential might be seen as a process leading to a negative climate feedback. This hypothesis was contested by the observation of a heat stress induced breakdown of pathogen-induced BVOC emissions. Conifers infested by aphids showed strong emissions of SQT and BVOC synthesized downstream of the shikimate pathway. Also these emissions are closely coupled to the CO2 uptake. Hence, these emissions vanished after heat stress causing a strong decrease of the SOA formation potential. At this stage it is difficult to assess whether heat and drought stress cause a negative or a positive feedbacks between vegetation and climate. Nevertheless, we conclude that such feedbacks exist. Key words: BVOC, SOA formation
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2011;

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1k Citations
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Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • Forschungszentrum Jülich
      • Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK)
      Jülich, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2011
    • Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
      Carlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2009
    • The Police Academy of the Czech Republic in Prague
      Praha, Praha, Czech Republic