Janine Hoffmann

University of Leipzig , Leipzig, Saxony, Germany

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Publications (26)73.94 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose To assess if real-time magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for atrial flutter is feasible in patients. Materials and Methods The study complied with the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the local ethics committee. All patients were informed about the investigational nature of the procedures and provided written informed consent. Ten patients (six men; mean age ± standard deviation, 68 years ± 10) with symptomatic atrial flutter underwent isthmus ablation. In all patients, two MR imaging conditional steerable diagnostic and ablation catheters were inserted into the coronary sinus via femoral sheaths and into the right atrium with fluoroscopic guidance. The patients were then transferred to a 1.5-T whole-body MR imager for an ablation procedure, in which the catheters were manipulated by an electrophysiologist by using a commercially available interactive real-time steady-state free precession MR imaging sequence. Results All catheters were placed in standard positions successfully. Furthermore, simple programmed stimulation maneuvers were performed. In one of 10 patients, a complete conduction block was performed with MR imaging guidance. In nine of 10 patients, creating only a small number of additional touch-up lesions was necessary to complete the isthmus block with conventional fluoroscopy (median, three lesions; interquartile range, two to four lesions). Conclusion Real-time MR imaging-guided placement of multiple catheters is feasible in patients, with subsequent performance of stimulation maneuvers and occasional complete isthmus ablation. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.
    Radiology 01/2014; · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:To determine the time course of enhancement patterns in the aorta and endoleaks at dynamic computed tomographic (CT) angiography as well as their effect on the endoleak detection rate in patients who have undergone abdominal aortic endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and Methods:This retrospective study was approved by the local ethics committee and compliant with the Declaration of Helsinki. All patients gave written informed consent for the scientific analysis of their data. Seventy-one patients (mean age, 72 years ± 8 [standard deviation]) were retrospectively included after EVAR of the abdominal aorta. All patients underwent dynamic CT angiography with 10 unidirectional scan phases, followed by a venous phase. Endoleaks were detected visually in all scan phases; the magnitude of enhancement was assessed by using region-of-interest measurements in the aorta and the detectable endoleaks. Statistical analysis was performed with the χ(2) test, the paired t test, and analysis of variance with repeated measurements.Results:The highest mean aortic enhancement was achieved 12 seconds after the bolus-tracking threshold, and the highest mean endoleak enhancement was achieved 22 seconds after the bolus-tracking threshold. In total, 44 endoleaks were detected. The detection rates differed significantly in between the dynamic CT angiography phases (minimum, seven endoleaks at 2 seconds after the bolus-tracking threshold; maximum, 44 endoleaks at 27 seconds after the bolus-tracking threshold; P = .001). The highest detection rate was achieved when the contrast between aortic and endoleak enhancement reached its maximum.Conclusion:Dynamic CT angiography revealed that the peak enhancement of endoleaks is significantly different than that of the aorta and that endoleaks may not be adequately evaluated with conventional biphasic CT protocols. The use of dynamic CT angiography is associated with a significantly increased detection rate of endoleaks compared with the detection rates at the time points of conventional biphasic CT.© RSNA, 2013.
    Radiology 04/2013; · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that myocardial scars cause systolic dysfunction in patients with transposition of the great arteries and a systemic right ventricle. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 20 consecutive patients (10 male, mean age 27.3 years) with a systemic right ventricle who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with 1.5 T. Cine steady-state free-precession sequences were performed to obtain volumes and function. Phase-sensitive inversion-recovery (PSIR) delayed-enhancement imaging was performed to detect myocardial scars. Tricuspid insufficiency was detected with echocardiography. Furthermore, the presence of arrhythmias and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class were assessed. RESULTS: Mean ejection fraction of systemic right ventricles was 43 ± 11 %, mean end-diastolic volume index was 111 ± 37 ml/m(2). Delayed-enhancement imaging revealed only one myocardial scar in the wall of a right ventricular aneurysm. All patients but one (95 %) presented with tricuspid insufficiency. Clinically relevant arrhythmias were present in 13/20 patients (65 %). The majority of patients (90 %) were NYHA class I or II. Arrhythmias, tricuspid insufficiency and NYHA class were not associated with right ventricular ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: Although right ventricular function was clearly impaired in our patient cohort, there was only one myocardial scar. Our results show that myocardial scarring assessed by PSIR delayed-enhancement imaging is not the underlying pathology of systemic right ventricular failure.
    Clinical Research in Cardiology 02/2013; · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To analyse the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial parameters to differentiate left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) from other cardiomyopathies and controls. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 12 patients with LVNC, 11 with dilated and 10 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and compared them to 24 controls. LVNC patients had to fulfil standard echocardiographic criteria as well as additional clinical and imaging criteria. Cine steady-state free precession and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging was performed. The total LV myocardial mass index (LV-MMI), compacted (LV-MMI(compacted)), non-compacted (LV-MMI(non-compacted)), percentage LV-MM(non-compacted), ventricular volumes and function were calculated. Data were compared using analysis of variance and Dunnett's test. Additionally, semi-quantitative segmental analyses of the occurrence of increased trabeculation were performed. RESULTS: Total LV-MMI(non-compacted) and percentage LV-MM(non-compacted) were discriminators between patients with LVCN, healthy controls and those with other cardiomyopathies with cut-offs of 15 g/m(2) and 25 %, respectively. Furthermore, trabeculation in basal segments and a ratio of non-compacted/compacted myocardium of ≥3:1 were criteria for LVNC. A combination of these criteria provided sensitivities and specificities of up to 100 %. None of the LVNC patients demonstrated LGE. CONCLUSIONS: Absolute CMR quantification of the LV-MMI(non-compacted) or the percentage LV-MM(non-compacted) and increased trabeculation in basal segments allows one to reliably diagnose LVNC and to differentiate it from other cardiomyopathies. KEY POINTS : • Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can reliably diagnose left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy. • Differentiation of LVNC from other cardiomyopathies and normal hearts is possible. • The best diagnostic performance can be achieved if combined MRI criteria for the diagnosis are used.
    European Radiology 07/2012; · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Systemic right ventricle (RV) hypertrophy and impaired function occur after atrial switch for dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). Echocardiography is limited in its ability to assess the RV. We sought to evaluate systemic RV myocardial-mass index (MMI) and function after atrial switch and to analyse the role of hypertrophy for ventricular function with special consideration of the interventricular septal (IVS) movement. METHODS: Thirty-seven consecutive patients (median age 22.9 years) after atrial switch were studied using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (1.5T Intera, Philips) with a dedicated 5-channel phased-array surface cardiac coil. Cine steady-state free-precession sequences were acquired to obtain myocardial masses and function. The systolic movement of the IVS was defined as positive when moving towards the centroid of the RV and was defined as non-positive otherwise. Patient parameters were compared to controls. RESULTS: The systemic RVs were significantly larger (p < 0.001) than the left ventricles of the control group, systolic function was significantly impaired (p < 0.001) and MMI including the IVS was comparable (p = n.s.). RV-MMI excluding the IVS and RV ejection fraction (EF) demonstrated a quadratic correlation (r = 0.6, p < 0.001), meaning that patients with RV-MMI ≤29 g/m(2) and >68 g/m(2) had a reduced level of systolic function. Positive septal movement improved RV function compared with non-positive septal movement (p = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be a range of beneficial RV hypertrophy after atrial switch in which a sufficient RV-EF can be expected. A positive septal movement, probably the result of hypertrophic septal RV fibres, improves RV function and might be regarded as a beneficial contraction pattern.
    Clinical Research in Cardiology 06/2012; · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Archives of Gynecology 06/2012; 286(5):1331-2. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with a congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries show an increasing incidence of cardiac failure with age. In other systemic right ventricles, such as in dextro-transposition after atrial switch, excessive hypertrophy is a potential risk factor for impaired systolic function. In this trial, we sought to compare systemic function and volumes between patients with congenitally corrected transposition and those with dextro-transposition after atrial switch by using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.Methods and ResultsA total of 19 patients (nine male) with congenitally corrected transposition and 31 patients (21 male) with dextro-transposition after atrial switch were studied using a 1.5-Tesla scanner. Cine steady-state free-precession sequences in standard orientations were acquired for volumetric and functional imaging. Patient parameters were compared with those of a group of 25 healthy volunteers. Although patients with congenitally corrected transposition were older, they presented with higher right ventricular ejection fractions (p = 0.04) compared with patients with dextro-transposition. Patients with congenitally corrected transposition showed a weak negative correlation between age at examination and systemic ejection fraction (r = -0.18, p = 0.04) but no correlation between right ventricular myocardial mass index and ejection fraction. There was no significant difference in the right ventricular end-diastolic volumes between both patient groups.Conclusion Although patients with congenitally corrected transposition had a longer pressure load of the systemic right ventricle, ventricular function was better compared with that in patients with dextro-transposition after atrial switch. The results suggest that the systemic ventricles might have partly different physiologies. One difference could be the post-operative situation after atrial switch, which results in impaired atrial contribution to ventricular filling.
    Cardiology in the Young 06/2012; · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with right ventricular injury (RVI) complicating ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have impaired prognosis, but it is unclear which patients are at risk of developing RVI. Cardiac magnetic resonance can identify these patients and might add important information on risk stratification, prognosis, and treatment. Aims were to determine the predictors and the prognostic significance of RVI assessed by wall motion abnormalities, edema, myocardial salvage index, and delayed enhancement in acute reperfused STEMI. We studied 450 patients 1-4 days after primary angioplasty in STEMI. T2-weighted and delayed-enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance was used for visualizing edema and scar to calculate myocardial salvage index. Cine-imaging was performed to assess wall motion abnormalities, which, in combination with edema, were considered diagnostic for RVI. Patients with RVI were compared with matched patients with isolated left ventricular infarction. The primary end point was the occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event: a composite of death, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure after a median follow-up period of 20.9 months. RVI was present in 69 patients, and 41 of 69 showed myocardial necrosis. In a multivariable stepwise forward logistic regression analysis, a high RV myocardial mass (odds ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-3.58; P=0.012) and a low Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow before angioplasty (odds ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.76; P=0.011) were associated with RVI. Cox regression analysis revealed RVI as the most statistically significant predictor of time to major adverse cardiac events (hazard-ratio, 3.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.99-5.66; P<0.001). RVI detected by cardiac magnetic resonance is a strong and independent predictor of clinical outcome after acute reperfused STEMI. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01359306.
    Circulation Cardiovascular Imaging 11/2011; 5(1):60-8. · 5.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the influence of different heart rates and arrhythmias on scanner performance, image acquisition and applied radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography (pCT). An ECG simulator (EKG Phantom 320, Müller & Sebastiani Elektronik GmbH, Munich, Germany) was used to generate different heart rhythms and arrhythmias: sinus rhythm (SR) at 45, 60, 75, 90 and 120/min, supraventricular arrhythmias (e.g. sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation) and ventricular arrhythmias (e.g. ventricular extrasystoles), pacemaker-ECGs, ST-changes and technical artifacts. The analysis of the image acquisition process was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT (Brilliance, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, USA). A prospectively triggered scan protocol as used for routine was applied (120 kV; 150 mAs; 0.4s rotation and exposure time per scan; image acquisition predominantly in end-diastole at 75% R-R-interval, in arrythmias with a mean heart rate above 80/min in systole at 45% of the R-R-interval; FOV 25 cm). The mean dose length product (DLP) and its percentage increase from baseline (SR at 60/min) were determined. Radiation exposure can increase significantly when the heart rhythm deviates from sinus rhythm. ECG-changes leading to a significant DLP increase (p<0.05) were bifocal pacemaker (61%), pacemaker dysfunction (22%), SVES (20%), ventricular salvo (20%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). Significantly (p<0.05) prolonged scan time (>8 s) could be observed in bifocal pacemaker (12.8 s), pacemaker dysfunction (10.7 s), atrial fibrillation (10.3 s) and sinus arrhythmia (9.3 s). In prospectively ECG triggered CT, heart rate and rhythm can provoke different types of scanner performance, which can significantly alter radiation exposure and scan time. These results might have an important implication for indication, informed consent and contrast agent injection protocols.
    European journal of radiology 10/2011; 81(9):2221-30. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Die Transposition der großen Gefäße (TGA) ist mit einer Häufigkeit von ca. 3–5% aller angeborenen Herzfehler eine seltene Erkrankung. Die Aorta entspringt ganz oder zum größten Teil aus dem morphologisch rechten und die Pulmonalarterie aus dem morphologisch linken Ventrikel. Es besteht also eine ventrikuloarterielle Diskordanz. Geht diese mit einer ventrikuloatrialen Konkordanz einher, spricht man von einer kompletten bzw. D-TGA, liegt zusätzlich auch eine ventrikuloatriale Diskordanz vor, von kongenital korrigierter oder L-TGA. Die D-TGA ist mit dem Leben nur bei gleichzeitigem Vorliegen eines Shunts vereinbar, der evtl. postnatal durch das so genannte Rashkind-Manöver auf Vorhofebene geschaffen werden muss. Heute wird primär die frühe anatomische Korrektur mit Hilfe der arteriellen „Switchoperation“ angestrebt. Bis in die 80er Jahre wurde zur Korrektur einer D-TGA auch die Vorhofumkehroperation, der „atrial switch“ nach Senning/Mustard durchgeführt. Bei der Bildgebung wird neben der Echokardiographie v.a. die MRT zur Klärung der komplexen anatomischen Verhältnisse, der Volumetrie, Vitalität und Funktionsanalyse sowie der Flussmessung eingesetzt. Ist die MRT kontraindiziert oder steht die Klärung der Anatomie im Vordergrund, insbesondere die Koronararteriendarstellung, ist die Multidetektorcomputertomographie (MDCT) die bildgebende Methode der Wahl. Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a rare disease representing not more than 3–5% of all congenital heart diseases. TGA is a cardiac anomaly in which the aorta arises entirely or largely from the morphological right ventricle and the pulmonary artery from the morphological left ventricle. This is called a ventriculo-arterial discordant connection and when accompanied by an atrio-ventricular concordant connection it is called a complete or D-transposition (D-TGA). The terms congenitally corrected TGA (ccTGA) or L-TGA describe an atrio-ventricular discordant connection. In D-TGA survival can only be achieved if additional shunting is simultaneously present, which possibly has to be created post-natal by the so-called Rashkind maneuver. Nowadays, an early anatomic correction using the arterial switch operation is the treatment of choice. Up to the 1980s, an atrial switch operation according to Senning/Mustard was performed. Apart from echocardiography the imaging modality of choice is usually MRI to assess the complex postoperative anatomy, viability of the myocardium and to perform a volumetric and functional assessment, including MR flow measurements. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is used if there are contraindications to MRI or if an assessment of cardiac and especially coronary anatomy is the main interest. SchlüsselwörterTransposition der großen Gefäße (TGA)–Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT)–Multidetektorcomputertomographie (MDCT)–Arterielle Umkehroperation–Vorhofumkehroperation KeywordsTransposition of the great arteries (TGA)–Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–Computed tomography (MDCT)–Arterial switch operation–Atrial switch operation
    Der Radiologe 01/2011; 51(1):15-22. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2011; · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2011; · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2011; · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2011; · 4.44 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a rare disease representing not more than 3-5% of all congenital heart diseases. TGA is a cardiac anomaly in which the aorta arises entirely or largely from the morphological right ventricle and the pulmonary artery from the morphological left ventricle. This is called a ventriculo-arterial discordant connection and when accompanied by an atrio-ventricular concordant connection it is called a complete or D-transposition (D-TGA). The terms congenitally corrected TGA (ccTGA) or L-TGA describe an atrio-ventricular discordant connection. In D-TGA survival can only be achieved if additional shunting is simultaneously present, which possibly has to be created post-natal by the so-called Rashkind maneuver.Nowadays, an early anatomic correction using the arterial switch operation is the treatment of choice. Up to the 1980s, an atrial switch operation according to Senning/Mustard was performed. Apart from echocardiography the imaging modality of choice is usually MRI to assess the complex postoperative anatomy, viability of the myocardium and to perform a volumetric and functional assessment, including MR flow measurements. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is used if there are contraindications to MRI or if an assessment of cardiac and especially coronary anatomy is the main interest.
    Der Radiologe 01/2011; 51(1):15-22. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate changes of right ventricular (RV) parameters in follow-up examinations after corrected tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). CMR was performed twice within 4 years in 45 patients using a 1.5 T scanner. RV-volumes and pulmonary-regurgitant-fractions (PRF) were calculated from standard cine-sequences and flow-sensitive gradient-echo images, respectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the post-operative (po) interval (group 1 ≤5 years po; group 2 >5 years po) and subgroups depending on type of surgery (transannular vs. non-transannular). Patient groups were compared among each other and differences between 1st and 2nd CMR were assessed. Furthermore, patients were compared with 25 healthy volunteers. Compared with controls RV-size was increased (group 1: p = 0.007; group 2: p < 0.001) and RV function decreased (group 1: p = 0.02; group 2: p < 0.001) in po TOF-patients. PRF was higher in group 2 compared with group 1 (p = 0.04) and significant changes of PRF between 1st and 2nd CMR were found in group 2 (p < 0.01), but not in group 1 (p = 0.29). Compared with the non-transannular subgroup, PRF (p < 0.001) and RV end-diastolic-volume index (RV-EDVI) (p = 0.03) were significantly higher in patients with a transannular patch, EDVI increased between 1st and 2nd CMR. After correction, no significant changes of RV myocardial mass index (RV-MMI) were found. After correction of TOF, RV-size, RV-muscle mass (RV-MM) was increased and ejection fraction decreased in "early" follow-up already. Whereas these parameters can remain stable over a long time period, the PRF significantly increased in "late" follow-up dependent on the po interval. Overall, transannular patching went along with higher PRF and bigger RV-size as well as a greater dynamic of these parameters in the time course, which makes this subgroup highly in need of regular follow-up examinations for the optimal timing of re-interventions. In contrast, the increased RV-MM demonstrated no regression po.
    Clinical Research in Cardiology 11/2010; 100(4):343-50. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Rofo-fortschritte Auf Dem Gebiet Der Rontgenstrahlen Und Der Bildgebenden Verfahren - ROFO-FORTSCHR RONTGENSTRAHL. 01/2010; 182.
  • Rofo-fortschritte Auf Dem Gebiet Der Rontgenstrahlen Und Der Bildgebenden Verfahren - ROFO-FORTSCHR RONTGENSTRAHL. 01/2010; 182.
  • Rofo-fortschritte Auf Dem Gebiet Der Rontgenstrahlen Und Der Bildgebenden Verfahren - ROFO-FORTSCHR RONTGENSTRAHL. 01/2010; 182.
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2010; · 4.44 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

34 Citations
21 Downloads
1k Views
73.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2012
    • University of Leipzig
      • Department of Cardiac Surgery
      Leipzig, Saxony, Germany
  • 2011
    • Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg
      Halle-on-the-Saale, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
  • 2010–2011
    • Kunststoff-Zentrum in Leipzig
      Leipzig, Saxony, Germany