Luiz Guilherme Antonacci Guglielmo

Federal University of Santa Catarina, Nossa Senhora do Destêrro, Santa Catarina, Brazil

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Publications (66)62.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two generic aerobic training (GAT) models, based on PVT-CAR in U-20 elite soccer players. Seventeen soccer players (age 17.9±1.0 years; 178.6±5.0 cm; 73.6±6.6 kg; 11.1±1.3%) from a team competing in a national junior league took part in the study. The athletes performed a series of pre and post training tests (incremental test on a treadmill to determine the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), velocity at maximal oxygen uptake (vVO2), the lactate threshold (LT) and T-CAR). The interval training models applied were with 180° direction change (T12:12; n=9) and without direction change (T6:6; n=8). No significant interaction (time vs. group) was observed for the majority of variables analyzed (p > 0.05), although significant main effects in time were evident regarding PVTREAD (F=56.3; P<0.0001), vVO2max (F=35.8; p<0.0001), LT (F=57.7; p<0.0001) and PVT-CAR (F=52.9; p<0.0001). Moreover, there was no significant change in VO2max between pre and post training period (F=4.26; p=0,056) in both training groups. Thus, it can be concluded that the prescribed training with and without direction change in the intensity of the PVT-CAR, increases the PVTREAD, the vVO2max, the LT and the PVT-CAR similarly.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 03/2015; · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two generic aerobic training (GAT) models, based on PVT-CAR in U-20 elite soccer players. Seventeen soccer players (age 17.9±1.0 years; 178.6±5.0 cm; 73.6±6.6 kg; 11.1±1.3%) from a team competing in a national junior league took part in the study. The athletes performed a series of pre and post training tests (incremental test on a treadmill to determine the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), velocity at maximal oxygen uptake (vVO2), the lactate threshold (LT) and T-CAR). The interval training models applied were with 180° direction change (T12:12; n=9) and without direction change (T6:6; n=8). No significant interaction (time vs. group) was observed for the majority of variables analyzed (p > 0.05), although significant main effects in time were evident regarding PVTREAD (F=56.3; P<0.0001), vVO2max (F=35.8; p<0.0001), LT (F=57.7; p<0.0001) and PVT-CAR (F=52.9; p<0.0001). Moreover, there was no significant change in VO2max between pre and post training period (F=4.26; p=0,056) in both training groups. Thus, it can be concluded that the prescribed training with and without direction change in the intensity of the PVT-CAR, increases the PVTREAD, the vVO2max, the LT and the PVT-CAR similarly.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of short repeated-sprint ability (RSA) training on the neuromuscular and physiological indices in U17 futsal players during the competitive period. Fourteen players were divided into two groups: intervention group (n = 8) and control group (n = 6). Both groups performed a repeated maximal sprint test (40-m MST), intermittent shuttle-running test (Carminatti's test) and vertical jumps before and after the training period. The intervention group was submitted to an additional four-week repeated sprints program, twice a week, while the control group maintained their normal training routine. There was no significant interaction between time and groups for all variables analysed (p > 0.05). However, a significant main effect was observed for time (p < 0.01) indicating an increase on speed at heart rate deflection point (V HRDP) and the continuous jump performance while the peak lactate (40m-LAC peak) and sprint decrement decreased after training, in both groups. Still, based on effect sizes (ES) the greater changes with practical relevance were verified for intervention group in important variables such as peak velocity (ES = 0.71), V HRDP (ES = 0.83) and 40m-LAC peak (ES = 1.00). This study showed that RSA-based and normal training routine are equally effective in producing changes in the analysed variables during a short period of intervention. However, the effect size suggests that four weeks of RSA training would be a minimum time that could induce the first changes of futsal player's physical fitness.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The physiological and motor skills assessments from specific tests are essential to predicting performance. Research question: This study proposes a method for evaluation of the anaerobic power and capacity during a specific Taekwondo anaerobic test (TAT). Type of study: This research comprised a descriptive study. Methods: Ten male athletes undertook the TAT, which consisted of kicking a punching bag as many times as possible over 30 s. The following variables were obtained: number of kicking cycles (AKC), mean kicking time (MKT), best kicking time (BKT), highest impact (HKI), mean impact (MKI) and fatigue index. Moreover, we measured the peak post-test blood lactate (LACmax) and muscular power during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Results: A drop in performance (cycle kicking time and impact magnitude) during the last 20% of kicking cycles was found when compared to the initial 20% kicking cycles (p=0.01). The CMJ was significantly correlated with AKC (r=0.70), BKT (r=-0.89) and MKT (r=-0.79). LACmax was significantly correlated with AKC (r=0.65). Conclusion: The TAT reproduces motor skills of taekwondo and can be used to obtain indicators of anaerobic fitness.
    INTERNATIONAL SPORTMED JOURNAL 12/2014; 15(4):492. · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Competitive endurance athletes commonly undertake periods of overload training in the weeks prior to major competitions. This investigation examined the effects of two seven-day high-intensity overload training regimes (HIT) on performance and physiological characteristics of competitive cyclists. The study was a matched groups, controlled trial. Twenty-eight male cyclists (mean ± SD, Age: 33±10 years, Mass 74±7 kg, VO2 peak 4.7±0.5 L·min-1) were assigned to a control group or one of two training groups for seven consecutive days of HIT. Before and after training cyclists completed an ergometer based incremental exercise test and a 20-km time-trial. The HIT sessions were ∼120 minutes in duration and consisted of matched volumes of 5, 10 and 20 second (short) or 15, 30 and 45 second (long) maximal intensity efforts. Both the short and long HIT regimes led to significant (p<0.05) gains in time trial performance compared to the control group. Relative to the control group, the mean changes (±90% confidence limits) in time-trial power were 8.2%±3.8% and 10.4%±4.3% for the short and long HIT regimes respectively; corresponding increases in peak power in the incremental test were 5.5%±2.7% and 9.5%±2.5%. Both HIT (short vs long) interventions led to non-significant (p>0.05) increases (mean ± SD) in VO2 peak (2.3%±4.7% vs 3.5%±6.2%), lactate threshold power (3.6%±3.5% vs 2.9%±5.3%) and gross efficiency (3.2%±2.4% vs 5.1%±3.9%) with only small differences between HIT regimes. Seven days of overload HIT induces substantial enhancements in time-trial performance despite non-significant increases in physiological measures with competitive cyclists.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e115308. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0115308 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Carl Paton, Vitor Costa, Luiz Guglielmo
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This investigation reports the effects of chewing caffeinated gum on race performance with trained cyclists. Twenty competitive cyclists completed two 30-km time trials that included a maximal effort 0.2-km sprint each 10-km. Caffeine (~3-4 mg · kg(-1)) or placebo was administered double-blind via chewing gum at the 10-km point following completion of the first sprint. Measures of power output, oxygen uptake, heart rate, lactate and perceived exertion were taken at set intervals during the time trial. Results indicated no substantial differences in any measured variables between caffeine and placebo conditions during the first 20-km of the time trial. Caffeine gum did however lead to substantial enhancements (mean ± 90% confidence limits (CLs)) in mean power during the final 10-km (3.8% ± 2.3%), and sprint power at 30-km (4.0% ± 3.6%). The increases in performance over the final 10-km were associated with small increases in heart rate and blood lactate (effect size of 0.24 and 0.28, respectively). There were large inter-individual variations in the response to caffeine, and apparent gender related differences in sprint performance. Chewing caffeine gum improves mean and sprint performance power in the final 10-km of a 30-km time trial in male and female cyclists most likely through an increase in nervous system activation.
    Journal of Sports Sciences 12/2014; DOI:10.1080/02640414.2014.984752 · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    T. Grossl, L.F. Barbosa, R.D. de Lucas, L.G.A. Guglielmo
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to analyse the accumulated oxygen uptake (VO2), as well the maintained time (TMcg) at high levels during a maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) exercise, determined in continuous (MLSScon) and intermittent (MLSSint) modes, until exhaustion.Method Fourteen trained cyclists performed an incremental maximal testing; 2‐5 continuous and 2‐4 intermittent constant workload trials, in order to identify the MLSScon and MLSSint, respectively; two tests until exhaustion (TTE) (continuous and intermittent) were conducted using their respective MLSS workloads.ResultsThe continuous TTE was significantly lower than TTE at intermittent protocol (54.7 ± 10.9 vs. 67.8 ± 14.3 min; p = 0.001). The VO2 at target workload (VO2cg) was higher at intermittent exercise (p < 0.05), at both situations (MLSS and TTE). On the other hand, TMcg and the VO2 accumulated in MLSS workloads (VO2ACcg) were higher during continuous mode (p < 0.0001), at both situations. The total VO2 accumulated (VO2ACt) was similar between intermittent and continuous cycling (MLSS: 104.7 ± 8.7 L vs. 103.9 ± 41.1 L and TTE: 193.8 ± 41.1 L vs. 226.4 ± 53.0 L, respectively).Conclusion When MLSS continuous and intermittent were performed with same duration or until exhaustion, the VO2ACt was similar, although the TMcg and VO2ACcg were smaller during intermittent exercise.
    Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte 11/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.ramd.2014.02.001
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    ABSTRACT: doi: 10.1080/17461391.2014.944874
    European Journal of Sport Science 08/2014; DOI:10.1080/17461391.2014.944874 · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of different methods of interval training (IT) on physiological variables and performance in competitive cyclists. Method. The classification of the IT methods were: a) sub-maximal (ITsub), b) high (ITmax) and c) supramaximum (ITsup). The search strategy included the following terms: interval training, interval training on cycling, high intensity interval training, high intensity interval training in cycling and sprint. We choose for the followed databases: PubMed, Google Scholar and SPORTDiscus. For this purpose, a search were in a period between July 2011 and February 2012. Results. The different methods of IT increased maximal aerobic power (Pmax), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), physiological thresholds, time to exhaustion (Tlim) and 40-km cycling time trial (CR40km ) in competitive cyclists. Conclusion. Therefore, the three methods of IT showed that 6-8 sessions of training during 4-6 weeks is necessary to improve physiological variables and cycling performance in competitive cyclists
    Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte 07/2014; 7(2):83-89.
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    ABSTRACT: RESUMO: O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar as características antropométricas e performance aeróbia e anaeróbia de adolescentes jogadores de futebol. Para tanto, participaram deste estudo 34 jogadores da categoria infantil (INF) (idade 14,44 ± 0,55 anos, massa corporal 60,94 ± 8,51 kg, estatura 173,16 ± 8,91 cm) e 30 jogadores da categoria juvenil (JUV) (idade: 15,94 ± 0,69 anos, massa corporal 70,0 ± 9,86 kg, estatura 177,58 ± 8,24 cm).Todos os adolescentes foram submetidos a medidas antropométricas, composição corporal e somatotipo, seguido pelos seguintes protocolos de campo: teste de Carminatti (T-CAR) para avaliação da potência aeróbia máxima a partir da determinação do pico de velocidade (PV), teste anaeróbio de sprints repetidos e teste de velocidade de 10 e 30 m. Para detectar possíveis diferenças entre as categorias competitivas foi utilizado o teste t de Student para amostras independentes adotando o nível de significância de 5%. Os jogadores JUV foram mais pesados, mais altos e apresentaram maiores perímetros musculares comparado aos jogadores INF, enquanto para o somatório das dobras cutâneas não foram visualizadas diferenças. Os desempenhos nos testes aeróbios e anaeróbios analisados foram significativamente superiores para a categoria juvenil em relação à infantil. Dessa forma, podemos concluir que a idade cronológica determina as diferenças nas características antropométricas e nos desempenhos físico de jovens jogadores no meio (categoria infantil) e final (categoria juvenil) da adolescência como provável resultado do processo de crescimento e maturação biológica. ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare anthropometric characteristics and aerobic and anaerobic performance of adolescent soccer players. For this, young soccer players classified as under 15 -U15 (n=34; age 14.44 ± 0.55 years, body mass 60,94 ± 8,51 kg, stature 173,16 ± 8,91 cm) and under 17 -U17 (n=30; age 15.94 ± 0.69 years, body mass 70,0 ± 9,86 kg, stature 177,58 ± 8,24 cm) participated in this study. All adolescents were submitted to performed anthropometric assessments, body composition andsomatotype, accompanied by the following field tests protocols: Carminatti test (T-CAR) for the evaluation of maximal aerobic power from the determination of the peak velocity (PV), repeated sprints anaerobic test (40 m RSA) and the 10 m and 30 m speed test. To detect possible differences between competitive age groups (U-17 vs. U-15) was used t test for independent samples adopting significance level of 5%. Older players (U-17) were heavier, taller and had greater muscle circumferences compared to youngest players belonging U-15 age group, while for the sum of skinfolds were not visualized differences among them. Thus, we can conclude that chronological age determines differences in morphological characteristics and motor performances (aerobic and anaerobic indicators) of young soccer players in middle (U-15) and end (U-17) of adolescence period as probable outcome of biological growth and development.
  • V.P. Costa, R.D. de Lucas, K.M. Souza, L.G.A. Guglielmo
    Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte 06/2014; 7(2):83-89. DOI:10.1016/S1888-7546(14)70067-X
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we examined the reliability and validity of peak velocity determined using the Carminatti's test (PVT-CAR) to evaluate the aerobic fitness of young soccer players (age 13.4 ± 1.2 years; range 10.3 to 15.4 years). To determine test-retest reliability of PVT-CAR, 34 adolescents (U-12, n=13; U-14, n=21) performed the Carminatti's test twice within 3-5 days. Validity was assessed in 43 adolescents (U-14, n=20; U-16, n=23) submitted to both the Carminatti's test and an incremental treadmill test to determine their aerobic fitness indicators. The intraclass correlation of PVT-CAR was 0.89, 0.93 and 0.81 with a coefficient of variation of 2.30% (0.33 kmh), 1.89% (0.26 kmh) and 2.66% (0.39 kmh) for the total sample (pooled data) or separately for the U-12 and U-14 groups, respectively. No significant difference was found between PVT-CAR and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) for the total sample (pooled data) or separately for the U-14 and U-16 groups. In addition, Bland and Altman plots evidenced acceptable agreement between them. The PVT-CAR was significantly related with peak velocity and MAS obtained in the incremental test for the total sample (r= 0.86 and 0.81, p<0.01, respectively) and separately for the U-14 (r= 0.84 and 0.75, p<0.01, respectively) and U-16 groups (r= 0.60 and 0.58, p<0.01, respectively). Furthermore, the PVT-CAR was correlated with the VO2peak (r=0.57, p<0.01) and the velocity associated to the second ventilatory threshold (r=0.69, p<0.01) when the data were pooled (total sample). As a result, the Carminatti's test may be considered as a reliable and valid measure for assessing and monitoring the development of MAS of young soccer players during adolescence.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 05/2014; 28(11). DOI:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000534 · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two different kinds of prior exercise protocols (continuous exercise [CE] versus intermittent repeated sprint [IRS]) on oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics parameters during high-intensity running. Methods Thirteen male amateur futsal players (age 22.8 ± 6.1 years; mass 76.0 ± 10.2 kg; height 178.7 ± 6.6 cm; VO2max 58.1 ± 4.5 ml.kg.min-1) performed a maximal incremental running test for the determination of the gas exchange threshold (GET) and maximal VO2 (VO2max). On two different days, the subjects completed a 6-min bout of high-intensity running (50 % ∆) on a treadmill that was 6-min after (1) an identical bout of high-intensity exercise (from control to CE), and (2) a protocol of IRS (6 x 40 m). Results We found significant differences between CE and IRS for the blood lactate concentration ([La]; 6.1 versus 10.7 mmol.L-1, respectively), VO2 baseline (0.74 versus 0.93 L.min-1, respectively) and the heart rate (HR; 102 versus 124 bpm, respectively) before the onset of high-intensity exercise. However, both prior CE and prior IRS significantly increased the absolute primary VO2 amplitude (3.77 and 3.79 L.min-1, respectively, versus control 3.54 L.min-1), reduced the amplitude of the VO2 slow component (0.26 and 0.21 L.min-1, respectively, versus control 0.50 L.min-1), and decreased the mean response time (MRT; 28.9 and 28.0 s, respectively, versus control 36.9 s) during subsequent bouts. Conclusion This study showed that different protocols and intensities of prior exercise trigger similar effects on VO2 kinetics during high-intensity running.
    Arbeitsphysiologie 01/2014; Ahead of Print. DOI:10.1007/s00421-014-3000-0 · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a potência muscular de membros inferiores a partir do counter movement jump (CMJ) em diferentes momentos da temporada (final da temporada, inicio e final da pré-temporada seguinte) em jogadores de futebol e, além disso, foram estudados dados de composição corporal nos três momentos analisados. Participaram do estudo 17 atletas de futebol com idade de 17,8 ± 1,1 anos da categoria juniores de um clube de futebol profissional participante da série A do Campeonato Brasileiro. O percentual de gordura corporal estimado no início da pré-temporada foi significativamente superior ao mensurado no final da temporada anterior (p<0,05). O desempenho no salto vertical apresentou uma queda significativa (5,8%, p<0,05) apenas após a realização da pré-temporada quando analisada a variável altura. Por outro lado, a potência muscular normalizada pelo peso corporal apresentou manutenção nos três momentos analisados, indicando que o desempenho no CMJ é uma variável que não apresenta alteração após um período curto (4 semanas) sem treinamento formal e que a maior ênfase no treinamento aeróbio na pré-temporada pode ter contribuído para reduzir os níveis de potência muscular e a altura atingida num salto vertical.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The purpose of the present investigation was to identify muscle damage, inflammatory response and oxidative stress blood markers in athletes undertaking the ultra-endurance MultiSport Brazil race. Eleven well-trained male athletes (34.3 ± 3.1 years, 74.0 ± 7.6 kg; 172.2 ± 5.1 cm) participated in the study and performed the race, which consisted of about 90 km of alternating off-road running, mountain biking and kayaking. Twelve hours before and up to 15 minutes after the race a 10 mL blood sample was drawn in order to measure the following parameters: lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, protein carbonylation, respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV activities, oxygen consumption and neopterin concentrations. After the race, plasma lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities were significantly increased. Erythrocyte TBA-RS levels and plasma protein carbonylation were markedly augmented in post-race samples. Additionally, mitochondrial complex II activity and oxygen consumption in post-race platelet-rich plasma were also increased. These altered biochemical parameters were accompanied by increased plasma neopterin levels. The ultra-endurance event provoked systemic inflammation (increased neopterin) accompanied by marked oxidative stress, likely by increasing oxidative metabolism (increased oxidative mitochondrial function). This might be advantageous during prolonged exercise, mainly for efficient substrate oxidation at the mitochondrial level, even when tissue damage is induced.
    Journal of Sports Sciences 10/2013; DOI:10.1080/02640414.2013.797098 · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the test-retest reliability of mechanical parameters derived from a 3-min isokinetic all-out test, performed at 60 and 100rpm. Reliability and validity of the peak oxygen uptake derived from 3-min isokinetic all-out test were also tested. 14 healthy male subjects completed an incremental ramp testing and four randomized 3-min isokinetic all-out test (two at 60rpm and two at 100rpm). The absolute and relative reliability of the following parameters were analyzed: peak power, mean power, end power, fatigue index, work performed above end power and peak oxygen uptake. No difference was found between each two sets of data, although there were between-cadence differences for peak power, mean power, end power, and fatigue index. Higher intra-class correlation (ICC) and lower coefficient of variation (CV) were found for end power (ICC=0.91 and 0.95; CV=5.6 and 5.7%) and mean power (ICC=0.97 and 0.98; CV=2.4 and 3.1%), than for peak power (ICC=0.81 and 0.84; CV=8.7 and 10%) and work performed above end power (ICC=0.79 and 0.84; CV=7.9 and 10.6%; values reported for 60rpm and 100rpm, respectively). High reliability scores were also observed for peak oxygen uptake at both cadences (60rpm, CV=3.2%; 100rpm, CV=2.3%,) with no difference with the incremental ramp testing peak oxygen uptake. The power profile and peak oxygen uptake of a 3-min isokinetic all-out test are both highly reliable, whether the test is performed at 60 or 100rpm. Besides, peak oxygen uptake and work performed above end power were not affected by the change in cadence while peak power, mean power, end power, and fatigue index were.
    Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 09/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.jsams.2013.09.005 · 3.08 Impact Factor
  • 05/2013; 15(4). DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n4p507
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (TCAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T-VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs.
    Journal of sports science & medicine 03/2013; 13(1):165-170. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to analyze the relationships among physiological and neuromuscular indices with the 200- and 400-m sprint running performance. Fourteen male sprinters performed the following tests: determination of 200- (P200) and 400-m (P400) running performance; determination of VO2max and the velocity associated at VO2max; squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ); and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Significant correlations were observed between SJ (r = -0.53), CMJ (r = -0.69), and MAOD (r = -0.65) with P200. Countermovement jump (CMJ) and MAOD explained 70% of the P200. The MAOD was the only variable to correlate significantly with P400 (r = -0.56); VO2max and CMJ were also selected in the regression together and explained 79% of P400. The indicators of muscular power and anaerobic capacity are capable of explaining P200. In the 400 m, the performance was determined by indices of anaerobic capacity, in conjunction with the athletes' aerobic and muscular power.
    Research in Sports Medicine An International Journal 02/2013; 21(2):124-35. DOI:10.1080/15438627.2012.757225 · 1.43 Impact Factor