Takashi Arima

Kagoshima University, Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan

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Publications (2)5.21 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We report an unusual case of bilateral, synchronous breast cancer in a male patient who had a history of estrogen therapy for prostate cancer. A 64-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with T1N0M0 prostate cancer and received a total prostatectomy. Twenty months after the resection, the patient developed multiple bone metastases, and received radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy, and hormone therapy for 15 months. After completing this treatment, he was diagnosed with T1N0M0 primary breast cancer in his left breast and underwent a modified mastectomy. Five months after the mastectomy he received systemic chemotherapy followed by estrogen therapy because of the progression of prostate cancer. Three months after this treatment, he was diagnosed with T1N0M0 primary breast cancer in his right breast. To the best of our knowledge, this is a rare case of synchronous bilateral male breast cancer following hormone therapy for prostate cancer.
    International Journal of Clinical Oncology 07/2009; 14(3):249-53. · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAM) are cell membrane-anchored proteins with potential implications for the metastasis of human cancer cells via cell adhesion and protease activities. In prostate cancer (PC), the ADAM-10 protein showed a nuclear localization whereas in benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) it was predominantly bound to the cell membrane. We hypothesized that the pathogenesis and progression of PC are attributable to the nuclear translocation of ADAM-10. Immunoblotting revealed that after 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone treatment, a 60-kDa active form of ADAM-10 was increased in the nuclear fraction but decreased in the cell membrane and cytoplasmic fractions of human androgen-dependent PC cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that after 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone treatment, the ADAM-10 protein was translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation of androgen receptor and ADAM-10 was detected in the nuclear fraction but not in the cell membrane and cytoplasmic fractions. Immunohistochemical study of 64 PC and 20 BPH samples showed that the intensity of ADAM-10 staining was significantly higher in the nuclei of PC cells than in the nuclei of BPH cells (P < 0.0001). It was also significantly lower in the cell membrane of PC cells than in the cell membrane of BPH cells (P = 0.0017). Nuclear staining intensity was significantly correlated with the clinical T-factor (P = 0.004), the Gleason score (P < 0.0001) and preoperative prostate-specific antigen levels (P = 0.0061). ADAM-10 small interfering RNA transfectants showed a significant decrease in cell growth compared to the controls. Our results suggest that in human PC, the nuclear translocation of ADAM-10 coupled with the androgen receptor is involved in tumor growth and progression.
    Cancer Science 11/2007; 98(11):1720-6. · 3.48 Impact Factor