D L Ng

Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (4)5.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The only treatment for coeliac disease is lifelong adherence to a rigorous gluten-free diet. The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of coeliac disease on the social aspects of daily life of individuals in the U.S.A. The present study used a self-administered survey including the standard Quality of Life questionnaire (12-item short-form) with validated disease-specific questions. sas statistical software 2010 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC, U.S.A.) was used to calculate the mean (SD). Individuals with coeliac disease overall had a low positive health perception. Validated diet and disease-specific questions revealed a significant negative impact on quality of life in social settings. Specifically, the areas of travel, dining out and family life are most affected. The negative impact of diet significantly decreased over time, although it did not resolve for the domains of dining out of the home and travel. Those diagnosed in childhood and maintained on the diet had less of an impact on the quality of life as an adult. Individuals with coeliac disease in the U.S.A. have a diminished quality of life, especially in the social aspects of life.
    Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 02/2012; 25(3):233-8. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The only treatment for coeliac disease is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. Several studies have reported nutritional deficiencies in individuals on a gluten-free diet. The present study aimed to determine whether the nutritional profile of gluten-free diet could be improved through the use of alternative grains. A retrospective review of diet history records by a celiac specialist dietitian were used to establish a 'standard' gluten-free dietary pattern. An 'alternative' gluten-free dietary pattern was developed that substituted naturally gluten-free grains or gluten-free products made from 'alternative' flours (oats, high fibre gluten-free bread and quinoa) in the standard pattern. A paired t-test was performed to identify statistical significance between the 'alternative' and standard gluten-free dietary pattern. Analysis of standard pattern indicated that 38% of meals and snacks contained no grain or starch choice. Of those meals that contained a grain or starch component, rice was the grain chosen 44% of the time. The inclusion of alternative grains or grain products provided a higher nutrient profile compared to the standard gluten-free dietary pattern (P = 0.002). Several nutrients; protein (20.6 g versus 11 g), iron (18.4 mg versus 1.4 mg), calcium (182 mg versus 0 mg) and fibre (12.7 g versus 5 g) were significantly increased by changing the grain or starch component in the dietary pattern. The B vitamin content (riboflavin, niacin and folate) was improved, although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.125). The inclusion of alternative grain-based products increased the nutrient profile of the gluten-free dietary pattern significantly.
    Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 07/2009; 22(4):359-63. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coeliac disease is a common, autoimmune disorder, for which the only treatment is lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. This study evaluates the economic burden of adhering to a gluten-free diet. A market basket of products identified by name brand, weight or package size for both regular wheat-based products and gluten-free counterparts was developed. The differences in price between purchase venues, both type of store (general grocery store, an upscale grocery store and a health food store and four internet-based grocery sites) and region was also analysed. Availability of gluten-free products varied between the different venues, regular grocery stores carried 36%, while upscale markets carried 41%, and health food stores 94%, compared with 100% availability on the internet. Overall, every gluten-free product was more expensive than their wheat-based counterpart (P <or= 0.05). Bread and pasta was twice as expensive as their wheat-based counterparts. Cost was affected more by shopping venue than geographic location. This study demonstrated that gluten-free foods have poor availability and are more expensive than their gluten-containing counterparts. The impact of these findings on dietary compliance and the quality of life needs to be addressed.
    Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 11/2007; 20(5):423-30. · 1.97 Impact Factor