Luc Camoin

Aix-Marseille Université, Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Publications (79)376.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: TLR2 has a prominent role in host defense against a wide variety of pathogens. Stimulation of TLR2 triggers MyD88-dependent signaling to induce NF-κB translocation, and activates a Rac1-PI 3-kinase dependent pathway that leads to transactivation of NF-κB through phosphorylation of the P65 NF-κB subunit. This transactivation pathway involves tyrosine phosphorylations. The role of the tyrosine kinases in TLR signaling is controversial, with discrepancies between studies using only chemical inhibitors and knockout mice. Here, we show the involvement of the tyrosine-kinase Lyn in TLR2-dependent activation of NF-κB in human cellular models, by using complementary inhibition strategies. Stimulation of TLR2 induces the formation of an activation cluster involving TLR2, CD14, PI 3-kinase and Lyn, and leads to the activation of AKT. Lyn-dependent phosphorylation of the p110 catalytic subunit of PI 3-kinase is essential to the control of PI 3-kinase biological activity upstream of AKT and thereby to the transactivation of NF-κB. Thus, Lyn kinase activity is crucial in TLR2-mediated activation of the innate immune response in human mononuclear cells. © The Author(s) 2015.
    Innate Immunity 06/2015; DOI:10.1177/1753425915586075 · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification that regulates cytosolic and nuclear proteins. We and others previously demonstrated that FoxO1 is O-GlcNAcylated in different cell types, resulting in an increase in its transcriptional activity. Four O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified in human FOXO1 but directed mutagenesis of each site individually had modest (T317) or no effect (S550, T648, S654) on its O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the consequences of mutating all four sites had not been investigated. In the present work, we mutated these sites in the mouse Foxo1 and found that mutation of all four sites did not decrease Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity, and would even tend to increase them. In an attempt to identify other O-GlcNAcylation sites, we immunoprecipitated wild-type O-GlcNAcylated Foxo1 and analysed the tryptic digest peptides by mass spectrometry using High-energy Collisional Dissociation. We identified T646 as a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1. However, site directed mutagenesis of this site individually or together with all four previously identified residues did not impair Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation and transcriptional activity. These results suggest that residues important for the control of Foxo1 activity by O-GlcNAcylation still remain to be identified. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 05/2015; 462(2). DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.04.114 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: During the last decade, the epidemiology of WNV in humans has changed in the southern regions of Europe, with high incidence of West Nile fever (WNF) cases, but also of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). The lack of human vaccine or specific treatment against WNV infection imparts a pressing need to characterize indicators associated with neurological involvement. By its intimacy with central nervous system (CNS) structures, modifications in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition could accurately reflect CNS pathological process. Until now, few studies investigated the association between imbalance of CSF elements and severity of WNV infection. The aim of the present study was to apply the iTRAQ technology in order to identify the CSF proteins whose abundances are modified in patients with WNND. Forty-seven proteins were found modified in the CSF of WNND patients as compared to control groups, and most of them are reported for the first time in the context of WNND. On the basis of their known biological functions, several of these proteins were associated with inflammatory response. Among them, Defensin-1 alpha (DEFA1), a protein reported with anti-viral effects, presented the highest increasing fold-change (FC>12). The augmentation of DEFA1 abundance in patients with WNND was confirmed at the CSF, but also in serum, compared to the control individual groups. Furthermore, the DEFA1 serum level was significantly elevated in WNND patients compared to subjects diagnosed for WNF. The present study provided the first insight into the potential CSF biomarkers associated with WNV neuroinvasion. Further investigation in larger cohorts with kinetic sampling could determine the usefulness of measuring DEFA1 as diagnostic or prognostic biomarker of detrimental WNND evolution.
    PLoS ONE 04/2014; 9(4):e93637. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0093637 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive malignancy characterized by an excessive resistance to all known anticancer therapies, a still largely elusive phenomenon. In order to identify original mechanisms, we have explored the role of post-translational modifications (PTMs) mediated by members of the ubiquitin family. Though alterations of these pathways have been reported in different cancers, no methodical search for these kinds of anomalies has been performed so far. Therefore, we studied the Ubiquitin, Nedd8, and SUMO1 specific proteomes of a pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2) and identified changes induced by Gemcitabine, the standard PDAC's chemotherapeutic drug. These PTMs profiles contained both known major substrates of all three modifiers as well as original ones. Gemcitabine treatment altered the PTM profile of proteins involved in various biological functions, some known cancer associated genes, many potentially cancer associated genes, and several cancer signaling networks, including canonical and non canonical WNT and PI3K/Akt/MTOR pathways. Some of these altered PTMs formed groups of functionally and physically associated proteins. Importantly, we could validate the Gemcitabine-induced PTMs variations of relevant candidates and we could demonstrate the biological significance of such altered PTMs by studying in detail the sumoylation of SNIP1, one of these new targets.
    Journal of Proteome Research 03/2014; 13(5). DOI:10.1021/pr401258d · 5.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent outbreaks of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection have been characterized by an increasing number of severe cases with atypical manifestations including neurological complications. In parallel, the risk map of CHIKV outbreaks has expanded because of improved vector competence. These features make CHIKV infection a major public health concern that requires a better understanding of the underlying physiopathological processes for the development of antiviral strategies to protect individuals from severe disease. To decipher the mechanisms of CHIKV infection in the nervous system, a kinetic analysis on the host proteome modifications in the brain of CHIKV-infected mice sampled before and after the onset of clinical symptoms was performed. The combination of 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ proteomic approaches, followed by mass spectrometry protein identification revealed 177 significantly differentially expressed proteins. This kinetic analysis revealed a dramatic down-regulation of proteins before the appearance of the clinical symptoms followed by the increased expression of most of these proteins in the acute symptomatic phase. Bioinformatic analyses of the protein datasets enabled the identification of the major biological processes that were altered during the time course of CHIKV infection, such as integrin signaling and cytoskeleton dynamics, endosome machinery and receptor recycling related to virus transport and synapse function, regulation of gene expression, and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These results reveal the putative mechanisms associated with severe CHIKV infection-mediated neurological disease and highlight the potential markers or targets that can be used to develop diagnostic and/or antiviral tools.
    PLoS ONE 03/2014; 9(3):e91397. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0091397 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Formins constitute a large family of proteins that regulate the dynamics and organization of both the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Previously we showed that the formin mDia1 helps tether microtubules at the cell cortex, acting downstream of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. Here, we have further investigated the contributions of mDia1 and its two most closely related formins, mDia2 and mDia3, to cortical microtubule capture and ErbB2-dependent breast carcinoma cell migration. We found that depletion of each of these three formins strongly disrupted chemotaxis without significantly impacting actin-based structures. Further, all three formins were required for the formation of cortical microtubules, in a non-redundant manner, and formin proteins defective in actin polymerization remained active for microtubule capture. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified differential binding partners of the FH2 domains of mDia1, mDia2, and mDia3, which may explain their non-redundant roles in microtubule capture. The FH2 domain of mDia1 specifically interacted with Rab6-Interacting Protein 2 (Rab6IP2). Further, mDia1 was required for cortical localization of Rab6IP2, and concomitant depletion of Rab6IP2 and IQGAP1 severely disrupted cortical capture of microtubules, demonstrating the coinvolvement of mDia1, IQGAP1, and Rab6IP2 in microtubule tethering at the leading edge.
    Molecular biology of the cell 01/2014; DOI:10.1091/mbc.E13-08-0482 · 5.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in developed countries, including Europe and the United States, have been associated with significantly higher neuropathology incidence and mortality rate than previously documented. The changing epidemiology, the constant risk of (re-)emergence of more virulent WNV strains, and the lack of effective human antiviral therapy or vaccines makes understanding the pathogenesis of severe disease a priority. Thus, to gain insight into the pathophysiological processes in severe WNV infection, a kinetic analysis of protein expression profiles in the brain of WNV-infected mice was conducted using samples prior to and after the onset of clinical symptoms. To this end, 2D-DIGE and gel-free iTRAQ labeling approaches were combined, followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry. Using these quantitative proteomic approaches, a set of 148 proteins with modified abundance was identified. The bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) of each protein dataset originating from the different time-point comparisons revealed that four major functions were altered during the course of WNV-infection in mouse brain tissue: i) modification of cytoskeleton maintenance associated with virus circulation; ii) deregulation of the protein ubiquitination pathway; iii) modulation of the inflammatory response; and iv) alteration of neurological development and neuronal cell death. The differential regulation of selected host protein candidates as being representative of these biological processes were validated by western blotting using an original fluorescence-based method. This study provides novel insights into the in vivo kinetic host reactions against WNV infection and the pathophysiologic processes involved, according to clinical symptoms. This work offers useful clues for anti-viral research and further evaluation of early biomarkers for the diagnosis and prevention of severe neurological disease caused by WNV.
    PLoS ONE 12/2013; 8(7):e68318. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0068318 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus responsible for hemorrhagic manifestations and multiple organ failure, with a high mortality rate. In infected humans, damage to endothelial cells and vascular leakage may be a direct result of virus infection or an immune response-mediated indirect effect. The main target cells are mononuclear phagocytes, endothelial cells and hepatocytes; the liver being a key target for the virus, which was described as susceptible to interferon host response and to induce apoptosis. To better understand the early liver cell alterations due to virus infection, the protein profile of in vitro CCHFV-infected HepG2 cells was analysed using two quantitative proteomic approaches, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. A set of 243 differentially expressed proteins was identified. Bioinformatics analysis (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis) revealed multiple host cell pathways and functions altered after CCHFV infection, with notably 106 proteins related to cell death, including 79 associated with apoptosis. Different protein networks emerged with associated pathways involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, ubiquitination/sumoylation, regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, and virus entry. Collectively, this study revealed host liver protein abundances that were modified at the early stages of CCHFV infection, offering an unparalleled opportunity of the description of the potential pathogenesis processes and of possible targets for antiviral research.
    Virus Research 10/2013; 179. DOI:10.1016/j.virusres.2013.10.013 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is a secondary metabolite produced by some Fusarium species that contaminate a large variety of grains and feedstuffs worldwide. ZEN has been associated with a wide variety of adverse health effects including hepatotoxic, hematologic, immunotoxic and genotoxic. In order to better understand the mechanism of ZEN toxicity, a proteomic approach was applied to characterize cellular responses of hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) to ZEN exposure. Protein extracts from cultured HepG2 cells treated with 100 µ m ZEN for 8 h, as well as extracts from control cells. The screening method applied to compare the proteome was based on the stable isotope approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). This study identified 982 proteins, among which peptides and their corresponding proteins were identified and quantified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ingenuity pathways analysis software was then used to determine the biological functions and canonical pathways associated with the ZEN-responsive proteins. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Journal of Applied Toxicology 07/2013; 33(7). DOI:10.1002/jat.1766 · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Hematology 05/2013; 88(5):E70-E71. · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the neurovascular unit, brain microvascular endothelial cells develop characteristic barrier features that control the molecular exchanges between the blood and the brain. These characteristics are partially or totally lost when the cells are isolated for use in in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models. Hence, the re-induction of barrier properties is crucial for the relevance of BBB models. Although the role of astrocyte promiscuity is well established, the molecular mechanisms of re-induction remain largely unknown. Here, we used a differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE)-based proteomics approach to study endothelial cellular proteins showing significant quantitative variations after BBB re-induction. We confirm that quantitative changes mainly concern proteins involved in cell structure and motility. Furthermore, we describe the possible involvement of the asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) pathway in the BBB phenotype re-induction process and we discuss ADMA's potential role in regulating endothelial function (in addition to its role as a by-product of protein modification). Our results also suggest that the intracellular redox potential is lower in the in vitro brain capillary endothelial cells displaying re-induced BBB functions than in cells with limited BBB functions.
    Proteomics 04/2013; 13(7). DOI:10.1002/pmic.201200166 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nef is a Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) auxiliary protein, which plays an important role in virus replication and the onset of acquired immunodeficiency. Although known functions of Nef might explain its contribution to HIV-1 associated pathogenesis, how Nef increases virus infectivity is still an open question. In vitro, Nef-deleted viruses have a defect that prevents efficient completion of early steps of replication. We have previously shown that this restriction is not due to the absence of Nef in viral particles. Rather, a loss of function in virus-producing cells accounts for the lower infectivity of nef-deleted viruses as compared with wild-type (WT) viruses. Here we used DiGE and iTRAQ to identify differences between the proteomes of WT and nef-deleted viruses. We observe that glucosidase II is enriched in WT virions whereas Ezrin, ALG-2, CD81 and EHD4 are enriched in nef-deleted virions. Functional analysis shows that glucosidase II, ALG-2 and CD81 have no or only Nef-independent effect on infectivity. By contrast, Ezrin and EHD4 are involved in the ability of Nef to increase virus infectivity (referred to thereafter as Nef potency). Indeed, simultaneous Ezrin and EHD4 depletion in SupT1 and 293T virus-producing cells result in a ∼30 and ∼70% decrease of Nef potency, respectively. Finally, while Ezrin behaves as an inhibitory factor counteracted by Nef, EHD4 should be considered as a co-factors required by Nef to increase virus infectivity.
    Journal of Virology 01/2013; DOI:10.1128/JVI.02477-12 · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Zearalenone (ZEA) is a mycotoxin produced by some Fusarium species. ZEA often occur as a contaminant in cereal grains and animal feeds. Human exposure occurs by ingestion of mycotoxin-contaminated products and can cause serious health problems. It was established that this mycotoxin have an hepato, haemato, immuno and genotoxic properties (Maaroufi et al., 1996; Lioi et al., 2004). While most ZEA toxic effects have been quite well investigated, more studies are required to elucidate its mechanisms of toxicity. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in ZEA toxicity, we used a proteomic approach, to assess the early changes in protein expression initiated by ZEA in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that, after 8h of exposure, cells were still viable and showed a significant change in a number of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. These changes may provide the early affected functions and yield further insight into mechanisms underlying the involvement of mycotoxin-induced diseases.
    Experimental and toxicologic pathology: official journal of the Gesellschaft fur Toxikologische Pathologie 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.etp.2012.11.007 · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Mutations in the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) core gene Vangl2 cause the most severe neural tube defects (NTD) in mice and humans. Genetic studies show that the Vangl2 gene genetically interacts with a close homologue Vangl1. How precisely Vangl2 and Vangl1 proteins interact and crosstalk has remained a difficult issue to address, with the main obstacle being the accurate discrimination of the two proteins, which share close sequence homology. Experimental evidence previously presented has been sparse and addressed with ectopically expressed proteins or with antibodies unable to biochemically discriminate Vangl1 from Vangl2, therefore giving rise to unclear results. Methodology and Main Findings A highly specific monoclonal anti-Vangl2 antibody was generated and rigorously tested on both recombinant and extracted Vangl2 using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, western blot, and immunoprecipitation experiments. This antibody efficiently affinity-purified Vangl2 from cell lysates and allowed the unambiguous identification of endogenous Vangl2 by proteomic analysis. Vangl1 was also present in Vangl2 immunoprecipitates, establishing the first biochemical evidence for the existence of Vangl2/Vangl1 heterodimers at an endogenous level. Epitope-tagged Vangl2 and Vangl1 confirmed that both proteins interact and colocalize at the plasma membrane. The Vangl2 antibody is able to acutely assess differential expression levels of Vangl2 protein in culture cell lines, as corroborated with gene expression analysis. We characterised Vangl2 expression in the cochlea of homozygous and heterozygous Lp mutant mice bearing a point mutation within the C-terminal Vangl2 region that leads to profound PCP defects. Our antibody could detect much lower levels of Vangl2Lp protein in mutant mice compared to the wild type mice. Conclusion Our results provide an in-depth biochemical characterisation of the interaction observed between Vangl paralogues.
    PLoS ONE 09/2012; 7(9):e46213. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0046213 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are widely used as a source of endothelial cells (EC). However, HUVEC characteristics cannot be extrapolated to other types of EC, particularly microvascular ECs. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of microvascular ECs and HUVEC. Proteomes of HUVEC and human microvascular pulmonary EC (HMVEC-P) and dermal EC (HMVEC-D) from healthy Caucasian donors were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Fatty acid binding proteins 4 and 5 were among the 159 and 30 proteins spots found to have at least twofold change in expression between HUVEC and HMVEC-D and between HUVEC and HMVEC-P samples, respectively. Eight protein spots showed twofold changed expression between HMVEC-D and HMVEC-P samples. Ingenuity® analysis revealed that proteins differentially expressed between HUVEC and HMVEC-D samples interact with retinoic acid. In vitro tubulogenesis assays showed a differential effect of retinoic acid between HUVEC and HMVEC. Moreover, serum IgG from patients with a rare vascular disease, systemic sclerosis, showed distinct reactivity profiles in HUVEC and HMVEC-D protein extracts. The proteome profiles of HUVEC and microvascular EC differ noticeably, which reflects distinct biological properties and influence immune recognition.
    Proteomics 08/2012; 12(15-16):2547-55. DOI:10.1002/pmic.201200060 · 3.97 Impact Factor
  • 08/2012; 14(3):349. DOI:10.4267/10608/1043
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    ABSTRACT: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively controls the exchanges between the blood and the brain: it is formed by tight junctions (TJs) between adjacent microvascular endothelial cells. The transmembrane protein claudin-5 is known as a key TJ protein at the BBB, although, the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates TJ tightness are poorly understood. To identify putative claudin-5 partners that contribute to TJ integrity, claudin-5-enriched membrane microdomains were prepared by cell fractionation, using the human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and claudin-5 immunoprecipitates were submitted to tandem mass spectrometry. Because a high concentration of mannitol is known to transiently destabilize TJs, this analysis was performed in basal conditions, after mannitol treatment, and after recovery of TJ integrity. We here demonstrate that the G-protein subunit αi2 (Gαi2) interacts with claudin-5 and that association is correlated with TJ integrity in hCMEC/D3 cells; also, a selective expression of Gαi2 is observed in human brain vasculature in situ. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Gαi2 or claudin-5 in hCMEC/D3 cells similarly increases their paracellular permeability and delays TJ recovery after mannitol treatment. Altogether, our results identify Gαi2 as a novel claudin-5 partner required for TJ integrity in brain endothelial cells.
    Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism: official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 02/2012; 32(5):860-73. DOI:10.1038/jcbfm.2011.202 · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: When in the vicinity of astrocytes, brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) develop the characteristic structural and functional features of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter has low cellular permeability and restricts various compounds from entering the brain. We recently reported that the cytoskeleton-related proteins actin, gelsolin and filamin-A undergo the largest quantitative changes in bovine BCECs after re-induction of BBB functions by co-culture with glial cells. In the present study, we used an in-depth, proteomic approach to quantitatively compare differences in Triton-X-100-solubilized proteins from bovine BCECs with limited or re-induced BBB functions (i.e. cultured in the absence or presence of glial cells, respectively). The 81 protein spots of differing abundance were linked to 55 distinct genes. According to the Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships classification system and an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, these quantitative changes mainly affected proteins involved in (i) cell structure and motility and (ii) protein metabolism and modification. The fold-changes affecting HSPB1, moesin and ANXA5 protein levels were confirmed by western blot analysis but were not accompanied by changes in the corresponding mRNA expression levels. Our results reveal that the bovine BCECs' phenotype adaptation to variations in their environment involves the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.
    Journal of proteomics 12/2011; 75(2):628-41. DOI:10.1016/j.jprot.2011.09.002 · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gliomas are primary tumors of the human central nervous system with unknown mechanisms of progression. Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) mutation is frequent in diffuse gliomas such as oligodendrogliomas. To gain insights into the physiopathology of oligodendrogliomas that have a better prognosis than other diffuse gliomas, we combined microdissection, 2-D DIGE and MS/MS focusing on proteome alterations associated with IDH1 mutation. We first compared tumor tissues (TT) and minimally infiltrated parenchymal tissues (MIT) of four IDH1-mutated oligodendrogliomas to verify whether proteins specific to oligodendroglioma tumor cells could be identified from one patient to another. This study resulted in identification of 68 differentially expressed proteins, with functions related to growth of tumor cells in a nervous parenchyma. We then looked for proteins distinctly expressed in TT harboring either mutant (oligodendrogliomas, n=4) or wild-type IDH1 (oligodendroglial component of malignant glio-neuronal tumors, n=4). This second analysis resulted in identification of distinct proteome patterns composed of 42 proteins. Oligodendrogliomas with a mutant IDH1 had noteworthy enhanced expression of enzymes controlling aerobic glycolysis and detoxification, and anti-apoptosis proteins. In addition, the mutant IDH1 migrated differently from the wild-type IDH1 form. Comparative proteomic analysis might thus be suitable to identify proteome alterations associated with a well-defined mutation.
    Proteomics 11/2011; 11(21):4139-54. DOI:10.1002/pmic.201000646 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), usually detected by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, are identified in 90% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Thus, approximately 10% of SSc patients have no routinely detectable autoantibodies, and for 20% to 40% of those with detectable ANAs, the ANAs do not have identified specificity (unidentified ANAs). In this work, we aimed to identify new target autoantigens in SSc patients. Using a proteomic approach combining two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting with HEp-2 cell total and enriched nuclear protein extracts as sources of autoantigens, we systematically analysed autoantibodies in SSc patients. Sera from 45 SSc patients were tested in 15 pools from groups of three patients with the same phenotype. A sera pool from 12 healthy individuals was used as a control. Proteins of interest were identified by mass spectrometry and analysed using Pathway Studio software. We identified 974 and 832 protein spots in HEp-2 cell total and enriched nuclear protein extracts, respectively. Interestingly, α-enolase was recognised by immunoglobulin G (IgG) from all pools of patients in both extracts. Fourteen and four proteins were recognised by IgG from at least 75% of the 15 pools in total and enriched nuclear protein extracts, respectively, whereas 15 protein spots were specifically recognised by IgG from at least four of the ten pools from patients with unidentified ANAs. The IgG intensity for a number of antigens was higher in sera from patients than in sera from healthy controls. These antigens included triosephosphate isomerase, superoxide dismutase mitochondrial precursor, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L and lamin A/C. In addition, peroxiredoxin 2, cofilin 1 and calreticulin were specifically recognised by sera from phenotypic subsets of patients with unidentified ANAs. Interestingly, several identified target antigens were involved in the transforming growth factor β pathway. We identified several new target antigens shared among patients with SSc or specific to a given phenotype. The specification of new autoantibodies could help in understanding the pathophysiology of SSc. Moreover, these autoantibodies could represent new diagnostic and/or prognostic markers for SSc.
    Arthritis research & therapy 05/2011; 13(3):R74. DOI:10.1186/ar3336 · 4.12 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
376.33 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2015
    • Aix-Marseille Université
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2004–2015
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2013
    • Armed Forces Biomedical Research Institute, France
      Bretigny, Île-de-France, France
  • 2001–2013
    • Institut Cochin
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1991–2010
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
    • Cea Leti
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2005
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1992–1999
    • Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 1998
    • Institut Charles Gerhardt
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France