Michael J Grabinski

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States

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Publications (8)16.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Combat veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan commonly experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use problems. In addition, these veterans often report significant barriers to receiving evidence-based mental health and substance use care, such as individual beliefs that treatment will be unhelpful, inconvenient, or that they should be able to handle their problems on their own. To increase access to treatment for this underserved population, a Web-based patient self-management program that teaches cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to manage PTSD symptoms and substance misuse was developed. This paper describes and provides results from an iterative, multistage process for developing the Web-based program and seeks to inform clinicians in the field about the preferences of veterans for using a Web-based CBT program. Systematic feedback was gathered from (a) three expert clinicians in the field, (b) focus groups of combat veterans (n = 18), and (c) individual feedback sessions with combat veterans (n = 34). Clinician feedback led to the incorporation of motivational strategies to increase participant engagement and an optional module that guides written trauma exposure work. Focus group feedback guided the research team to frame the program in a strength-based approach and allows for maximum flexibility, adaptability, interactivity, and privacy for veterans. In individual feedback sessions, veterans generally found the program likable, easy to use, and relevant to their experiences; critiques of the program led to revised content meant to increase clarity and participant interest. Our findings provide specific guidance for clinicians who are interested in developing or providing technology-based treatment, including the need to gather feedback from an intervention's target audience when adapting a psychotherapeutic intervention and that the treatment must be highly interactive and private to engage clients.
    Cognitive and Behavioral Practice 04/2014; · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • Jesse Dallery, Bethany R Raiff, Michael J Grabinski
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated an Internet-based contingency management intervention to promote smoking cessation. Participants in the contingent group (n = 39) earned vouchers contingent on video confirmation of breath carbon monoxide (CO) ≤ 4 parts per million (ppm). Earnings for participants in the noncontingent group (n = 38) were independent of CO levels. Goals and feedback about smoking status were provided on participants' homepages. The median percentages of negative samples during the intervention in the noncontingent and contingent groups were 25% and 66.7%, respectively. There were no significant differences in absolute CO levels or abstinence at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Compared to baseline, however, participants in both groups reduced CO by an estimated 15.6 ppm during the intervention phases. The results suggest that the contingency for negative COs promoted higher rates of abstinence during treatment, and that other elements of the system, such as feedback, frequent monitoring, and goals, reduced smoking.
    Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 09/2013; · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study is the first experimental trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based behavioral intervention when deployed in a model where it partially substituted for standard counseling in a community-based specialty addiction treatment program. New opioid-dependent intakes in methadone maintenance treatment (n=160) were randomly assigned for 12months to either: (1) standard treatment or (2) reduced standard treatment plus a Web-based psychosocial intervention, the Therapeutic Education System (TES). Results demonstrated that replacing a portion of standard treatment with TES resulted in significantly greater rates of objectively measured opioid abstinence (48% vs. 37% abstinence across all study weeks; F(1, 158)=5.90, p<.05 and 59% vs. 43% abstinence on weeks participants provided urine samples for testing; F(1, 158)=8.81, p<.01). This result was robust and was evident despite how opioid abstinence was operationally defined and evaluated. The potential implications for service delivery models within substance abuse treatment programs and other healthcare entities are discussed.
    Journal of substance abuse treatment 09/2013; · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the development of an interactive, web-based self-management intervention for opioid-treated, chronic pain patients with aberrant drug-related behavior. Fifty-three chronic pain patients participated in either focus groups (N = 23) or individual feedback sessions (N = 30). Focus groups probed interest in and relevance of the planned content and structure of the program. Individual session participants reviewed draft program modules and provided feedback on acceptability, ease of use, and usefulness. Focus group transcripts were thematically analyzed, and summary statistics were performed on feedback data. Focus group participants stressed the need for additional pain management strategies and emphasized themes consistent with planned program content related to: 1) ambivalence about opioids; 2) reciprocal relationships among cognition, mood, and pain; 3) importance of recognizing physical limitations; and 4) effectiveness of goal setting for increasing motivation and functioning. Participants also offered insights on: 5) the loss of identity due to chronic pain; and 6) the desire to connect with pain peers to share strategies for managing daily life. Feedback session data demonstrate that participants believed that a web-based tool would be potentially useful and acceptable, and that exposure to program sections significantly increased participants' knowledge of key topics related to self-management of chronic pain. Results suggest the potential value of self-management for chronic pain patients and the potential acceptability of web-based delivery of intervention content. Focus group and feedback methodologies highlight the usefulness of including potential program users in intervention development.
    Pain Medicine 07/2013; · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    Steven E Meredith, Michael J Grabinski, Jesse Dallery
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    ABSTRACT: In contingency management (CM) interventions, monetary consequences are contingent on evidence of drug abstinence. Typically, these consequences are contingent on individual performance. Consequences contingent on group performance may promote social support (e.g., praise). Thus, to combine social support with the monetary incentives of CM, we integrated independent and interdependent group contingencies of reinforcement into an Internet-based intervention to promote smoking abstinence. Breath carbon monoxide (CO) measures were compared between treatment conditions and a baseline control condition. Thirteen participants were divided into 5 groups or "teams" (n=2-3 per team). Each participant submitted video recordings of CO measurement twice daily via the Internet. Teammates could monitor each other's progress and communicate with one another through an online peer support forum. During a 4-day tapering condition, vouchers exchangeable for goods were contingent on gradual reductions in breath CO. During a 10-day abstinence induction condition, vouchers were contingent on abstinence (CO≤4ppm). In both treatment conditions, concurrent independent and interdependent group contingencies were arranged (i.e., a mixed contingency arrangement). Less than 1% of CO samples submitted during baseline were≤4ppm, compared to 57% submitted during abstinence induction. Sixty-five percent of participants' comments on the online peer support forum were rated as positive by independent observers. Participants rated the intervention favorably on a treatment acceptability questionnaire. The results suggest that the intervention is feasible and acceptable for promoting abstinence from cigarette smoking.
    Drug and alcohol dependence 03/2011; 118(1):23-30. · 3.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We developed an interactive, customizable, Web-based program focused on the prevention of HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and hepatitis among youth. Results from a randomized, controlled trial with youth in treatment for substance use demonstrated that this Web-based tool, when provided as an adjunct to an educator-delivered prevention intervention, increased accurate prevention knowledge, increased intentions to carefully choose partners, and was perceived as significantly more useful relative to the educator-delivered intervention when provided alone. Results suggest this Web-based program may be effective and engaging and may increase the adoption of effective HIV and disease prevention science for youth. Limitations are discussed.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 01/2011; 46(1):46-56. · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The most potent outcomes for cannabis use disorders have been observed with a combination of three evidence-based interventions, motivational enhancement therapy (MET), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and abstinence-based contingency-management (CM). Access to this intervention remains limited because of cost and service availability issues. This report describes the initial stages of a project designed to develop and test a computer-assisted version of MET/CBT/CM that could address many of the current barriers to its dissemination. A nonrandomized, 12-week comparison study assigned 38 adults seeking treatment for a cannabis use disorder to either therapist-delivered (n=22) or computer-delivered (n=16) MET/CBT/CM. Attendance, retention, and cannabis use outcomes did not differ significantly between groups, and there were no indications of superior outcomes favoring therapist delivery. Participants provided positive ratings of the computer-delivered sessions. These preliminary findings suggest that computer-assisted delivery of MET/CBT/CM is acceptable to outpatients and does not adversely impact compliance or outcomes achieved during treatment with MET/CBT/CM for cannabis use disorders. Assessment of post-treatment outcomes and replication in randomized trials are needed to determine reliability and longer term effects. As observed in a growing number of studies, computerized therapies have the potential to increase access to, reduce costs, and enhance fidelity of providing evidence-based treatments without sacrificing and possibly enhancing effectiveness.
    Drug and alcohol dependence 12/2010; 115(1-2):74-9. · 3.60 Impact Factor
  • Lisa A Marsch, Warren K Bickel, Michael J Grabinski
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides an overview of several interactive, computer-based substance abuse-prevention and -treatment interventions that we have developed for adolescents, including an interactive substance abuse-prevention multimedia program for middle school-aged youth and a customizable program focused on prevention of HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections among youth in substance abuse treatment. The content in these programs is grounded in a scientific understanding of the types of skills and information that are critical to effective prevention. The programs also use several evidence-based informational technologies that have been shown to be critical in effectively training key skills and information. Our evaluations to date have underscored the effectiveness of these programs in producing desired health-behavior change. Applying information technologies to the delivery of science-based interventions may allow for unique opportunities to provide widespread dissemination of cost-effective interventions with consistency and in a manner that is engaging and acceptable to youth.
    Adolescent medicine: state of the art reviews 09/2007; 18(2):342-56, xii.