Andrew C Goodwin

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (7)42.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: It is estimated that the etiology of 20-30% of epithelial cancers is directly associated with inflammation, although the direct molecular events linking inflammation and carcinogenesis are poorly defined. In the context of gastrointestinal disease, the bacterium enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a significant source of chronic inflammation and has been implicated as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Spermine oxidase (SMO) is a polyamine catabolic enzyme that is highly inducible by inflammatory stimuli resulting in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We now demonstrate that purified B. fragilis toxin (BFT) up-regulates SMO in HT29/c1 and T84 colonic epithelial cells, resulting in SMO-dependent generation of ROS and induction of γ-H2A.x, a marker of DNA damage. Further, ETBF-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with increased SMO expression and treatment of mice with an inhibitor of polyamine catabolism, N(1),N(4)-bis(2,3-butandienyl)-1,4-butanediamine (MDL 72527), significantly reduces ETBF-induced chronic inflammation and proliferation. Most importantly, in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, treatment with MDL 72527 reduces ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis by 69% (P < 0.001). The results of these studies indicate that SMO is a source of bacteria-induced ROS directly associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as a unique target for chemoprevention.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2011; 108(37):15354-9. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 1 (AZ1) is a major regulatory protein responsible for the regulation and degradation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). To better understand the role of AZ1 in polyamine metabolism and in modulating the response to anticancer polyamine analogues, a small interfering RNA strategy was used to create a series of stable clones in human H157 non-small cell lung cancer cells that expressed less than 5-10% of basal AZ1 levels. Antizyme 1 knockdown clones accumulated greater amounts of the polyamine analogue N (1),N (11)-bis(ethyl)norspermine (BENSpm) and were more sensitive to analogue treatment. The possibility of a loss of polyamine uptake regulation in the knockdown clones was confirmed by polyamine uptake analysis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that AZ1 knockdown leads to dysregulation of polyamine uptake, resulting in increased analogue accumulation and toxicity. Importantly, there appears to be little difference between AZ1 knockdown cells and cells with normal levels of AZ1 with respect to ODC regulation, suggesting that another regulatory protein, potentially AZ2, compensates for the loss of AZ1. The results of these studies are important for the understanding of both the regulation of polyamine homeostasis and in understanding the factors that regulate tumor cell sensitivity to the anti-tumor polyamine analogues.
    Amino Acids 08/2011; 42(2-3):529-38. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spermine oxidase (SMO), the most recently characterized polyamine metabolic enzyme, catalyzes the direct back-conversion of spermine to spermidine in an FAD-dependent reaction that also yields the byproducts hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and 3-aminopropanal. These metabolites, particularly H(2)O(2), have been implicated in cytotoxic cellular responses to specific antitumor polyamine analogs, as well as in the inflammation-associated generation of DNA damage. This chapter describes a rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive method for the chemiluminescent measurement of SMO (or alternatively, N (1)-acetyl polyamine oxidase, APAO) enzyme activity in cultured cell lysates, without the need for radioactive reagents or the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specifically, H(2)O(2) production by SMO is coupled to chemiluminescence generated by the horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of luminol. Detailed protocols for preparation of reagents, harvesting cell lysates, generation of a standard curve, assaying of samples, and calculation of SMO enzyme activity are presented.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 01/2011; 720:173-81. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent discovery of the direct oxidation of spermine via spermine oxidase (SMO) as a mechanism through which specific antitumor polyamine analogues exert their cytotoxic effects has fueled interest in the study of the polyamine catabolic pathway. A major byproduct of spermine oxidation is H2O2, a source of toxic reactive oxygen species. Recent targeted small interfering RNA studies have confirmed that SMO-produced reactive oxygen species are directly responsible for oxidative stress capable of inducing apoptosis and potentially mutagenic DNA damage. In the present study, we describe a second catalytically active splice variant protein of the human spermine oxidase gene, designated SMO5, which exhibits substrate specificities and affinities comparable to those of the originally identified human spermine oxidase-1, SMO/PAOh1, and, as such, is an additional source of H2O2. Importantly, overexpression of either of these SMO isoforms in NCI-H157 human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells resulted in significant localization of SMO protein in the nucleus, as determined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, cell lines overexpressing either SMO/PAOh1 or SMO5 demonstrated increased spermine oxidation in the nucleus, with accompanying alterations in individual nuclear polyamine concentrations. This increased oxidation of spermine in the nucleus therefore increases the production of highly reactive H2O2 in close proximity to DNA, as well as decreases nuclear spermine levels, thus altering the protective roles of spermine in free radical scavenging and DNA shielding, and resulting in an overall increased potential for oxidative DNA damage in these cells. The results of these studies therefore have considerable significance both with respect to targeting polyamine oxidation as an antineoplastic strategy, and in regard to the potential role of spermine oxidase in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis.
    FEBS Journal 07/2008; 275(11):2795-806. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy. The recent successes of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in MM therapy have prompted investigations of its efficacy in combination with other anticancer agents. Polyamines play important roles in regulating tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis and represent an important therapeutic target. CGC-11093 is a novel polyamine analogue that has completed a phase I clinical trial for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report that CGC-11093 selectively augments the in vitro and in vivo antimyeloma activity of bortezomib. Specifically, the combination of CGC-11093 and bortezomib compromised MM viability and clonogenic survival, and increased drug-induced apoptosis over that achieved by either single agent. Xenografts of MM tumors treated with this combination had marked increases in phospho-c-Jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK)-positive cells and apoptosis, and corresponding reductions in tumor burden, tumor vasculature, and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the proangiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, inhibition of JNK with a pharmacologic inhibitor or by selective knockdown blunted the efficacy of CGC-11093 and bortezomib. Therefore, CGC-11093 enhances the anticancer activity of bortezomib by augmenting JNK-mediated apoptosis and blocking angiogenesis. These findings support the study of the use of the combination of bortezomib and CGC-11093 in MM patients that fail to respond to frontline therapy.
    Cancer Research 07/2008; 68(12):4783-90. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammation has been strongly implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking inflammation and carcinogenic DNA damage are not known. Induction of the polyamine catabolic enzyme, spermine oxidase (SMO) has been linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in human gastric and lung epithelial cells and suggest direct mechanistic links between inflammation, SMO activity, ROS production, and epithelial carcinogenesis that are likely relevant in prostate cancer. Tissue microarrays consisting of matched normal and diseased specimens from patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), or proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), as well as unaffected individuals, were stained for SMO expression and analyzed using image analysis techniques and TMAJ software tools. Average SMO staining was significantly higher in prostate cancer and PIN tissues compared to patient-matched benign tissues. Benign tissues from prostate cancer, PIN, and PIA patients also exhibited significantly higher mean SMO expression versus tissues from prostate disease-free patients. Tissues from patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and PIN exhibit, on average, locally increased SMO expression in regions of prostatic disease and higher overall SMO expression in prostatic epithelial cells compared to healthy individuals. Further studies are warranted to directly examine the role of SMO-produced ROS in prostate carcinogenesis.
    The Prostate 06/2008; 68(7):766-72. · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epigenetic chromatin modification is a major regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, and aberrant epigenetic silencing of gene expression contributes to tumorigenesis. Histone modifications include acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, resulting in a combination of histone marks known collectively as the histone code. The chromatin marks at a given promoter determine, in part, whether specific promoters are in an open/active conformation or closed/repressed conformation. Dimethyl-lysine 4 histone H3 (H3K4me2) is a transcription-activating chromatin mark at gene promoters, and demethylation of this mark by the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), a homologue of polyamine oxidases, may broadly repress gene expression. We now report that novel biguanide and bisguanidine polyamine analogues are potent inhibitors of LSD1. These analogues inhibit LSD1 in human colon carcinoma cells and affect a reexpression of multiple, aberrantly silenced genes important in the development of colon cancer, including members of the secreted frizzle-related proteins (SFRPs) and the GATA family of transcription factors. Furthermore, we demonstrate by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that the reexpression is concurrent with increased H3K4me2 and acetyl-H3K9 marks, decreased H3K9me1 and H3K9me2 repressive marks. We thus define important new agents for reversing aberrant repression of gene transcription.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2007; 104(19):8023-8. · 9.81 Impact Factor