M. Benjamin Perryman

University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States

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Publications (5)13.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal11q. Many of the most common and severe congenital heart defects that occur in the general population occur in 11q-. Previous studies have demonstrated that gene-targeted deletion in mice of ETS-1, a cardiac transcription factor in distal 11q, causes ventricular septal defects with 100% penetrance. It is unclear whether deletion of other genes in distal 11q contributes to the full spectrum of congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. Three patients with congenital heart defects have been identified that carry a translocation or paracentric inversion with a breakpoint in distal 11q disrupting one of two functionally related genes, OPCML and Neurotrimin. OPCML and Neurotrimin are two members of the IgLON subfamily of cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we report the generation and cardiac phenotype of single and double heterozygous gene-targeted OPCML and Neurotrimin knockout mice. No cardiac phenotype was detected, consistent with a single gene model as the cause of the congenital heart defects in 11q-. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 01/2014; · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital heart defects comprise the most common form of major birth defects, affecting 0.7% of all newborn infants. Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal 11q. We have previously determined that a wide spectrum of the most common congenital heart defects occur in 11q-, including an unprecedented high frequency of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). We identified an approximately 7 Mb 'cardiac critical region' in distal 11q that contains a putative causative gene(s) for congenital heart disease. In this study, we utilized chromosomal microarray mapping to characterize three patients with 11q- and congenital heart defects that carry interstitial deletions overlapping the 7 Mb cardiac critical region. We propose that this 1.2 Mb region of overlap harbors a gene(s) that causes at least a subset of the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. We demonstrate that one gene in this region, ETS-1 (a member of the ETS family of transcription factors), is expressed in the endocardium and neural crest during early mouse heart development. Gene-targeted deletion of ETS-1 in mice in a C57/B6 background causes, with high penetrance, large membranous ventricular septal defects and a bifid cardiac apex, and less frequently a non-apex-forming left ventricle (one of the hallmarks of HLHS). Our results implicate an important role for the ETS-1 transcription factor in mammalian heart development and should provide important insights into some of the most common forms of congenital heart disease.
    Hum Mol Genet. 01/2010; 19(4):648-56.
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital heart defects comprise the most common form of major birth defects, affecting 0.7% of all newborn infants. Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal 11q. We have previously determined that a wide spectrum of the most common congenital heart defects occur in 11q-, including an unprecedented high frequency of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). We identified an approximately 7 Mb 'cardiac critical region' in distal 11q that contains a putative causative gene(s) for congenital heart disease. In this study, we utilized chromosomal microarray mapping to characterize three patients with 11q- and congenital heart defects that carry interstitial deletions overlapping the 7 Mb cardiac critical region. We propose that this 1.2 Mb region of overlap harbors a gene(s) that causes at least a subset of the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. We demonstrate that one gene in this region, ETS-1 (a member of the ETS family of transcription factors), is expressed in the endocardium and neural crest during early mouse heart development. Gene-targeted deletion of ETS-1 in mice in a C57/B6 background causes, with high penetrance, large membranous ventricular septal defects and a bifid cardiac apex, and less frequently a non-apex-forming left ventricle (one of the hallmarks of HLHS). Our results implicate an important role for the ETS-1 transcription factor in mammalian heart development and should provide important insights into some of the most common forms of congenital heart disease.
    Human Molecular Genetics 11/2009; 19(4):648-56. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 11q terminal deletion disorder (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by a deletion in distal 11q. Fifty-six percent of patients have clinically significant congenital heart defects. A cardiac "critical region" has been identified in distal 11q that contains over 40 annotated genes. In this study, we identify the distal breakpoint of a patient with a paracentric inversion in distal 11q who had hypoplastic left heart and congenital thrombocytopenia. The distal breakpoint mapped to JAM-3, a gene previously identified as a candidate gene for causing HLHS in 11q-. To determine the role of JAM-3 in cardiac development, we performed a comprehensive cardiac phenotypic assessment in which the mouse homolog for JAM-3, JAM-C, has been deleted. These mice have normal cardiac structure and function, indicating that haplo-insufficiency of JAM-3 is unlikely to cause the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q- patients. Notably, we identified a previously undescribed phenotype, jitteriness, in most of the sick or dying adult JAM-C knockout mice. These data provide further insights into the identification of the putative disease-causing cardiac gene(s) in distal 11q, as well as the functions of JAM-C in normal organ development.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 08/2009; 149A(7):1438-43. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mouse has become a powerful genetic tool for studying genes involved in cardiac development and congenital heart disease. Many of the most severe congenital heart defects are ductal-dependent, resulting in neonatal lethality. Recent advances in ultrasound technology provide an opportunity for the use of high-frequency transducers to characterize the cardiac anatomy and physiology of the newborn mouse. In this study, we define limited normative values for cardiac structure and function in the C57BL newborn mouse. Specifically, we define normal values for 19 indices derived from standard echocardiographic views. This study demonstrates that transthoracic echocardiography using a 40-MHz high-frequency transducer is a safe and reliable noninvasive modality for the delineation of cardiac anatomy and physiology in the newborn mouse.
    Echocardiography 03/2007; 24(4):412 - 419. · 1.26 Impact Factor